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Found 111 results

  1. Top HTML5 game developersThe spry march of digital technology has ushered a radical transformation in the entertainment segment, the way it was perceived and consumed. The over dramatic daily soaps replaced by more relevant web series, the noisy news channels are muted for the tailored-to-taste news feed and child’s play time has shifted from the outdoor parks to the computer deck. With the heroic stunts and captivating sequences of the virtual world, browser games have taken the world by a thundering storm.There is no two say that today’s ground breaking source of entertainment for the millennials is the craze for HTML 5 games coupled with the captivating graphics, enchanting characters, and intriguing strategies that keeps the players glued to their screen. It’s not just the millennials infatuating over the flashy games and challenging strategies but even the adults can’t keep off these instantly addictive games.With such a diverse palette of consumers and their manifold tastes, it creates a huge vent in the gaming world pushing the boundaries to create custom made game strategies that could address the appetite of the cohorts of different realms. The consumer today demands flexibility and portability of their favourite games which paves the way for HTML5 games to create waves across the globe.Catering to this unflinching demand for more challenging, more interesting and more target oriented tailored gaming concepts we’ve witnessed quantum-shift levels of improvements in every aspect of the games from its audio/video quality to concepts over the past few years. Today, the web offers an ocean of gaming options right from educative, engaging, entertaining or challenging. From Barbie dressing to counter strike, crime scenes to investment puzzles there is a game for anything and everything.Customers urge for choices of platform where in they can plug into their current level from any device, be it their smart phone, laptop or desktop. As such, HTML5 is unanimously favoured by web developers and game developers as it provides cutting-edge features, of 2D and 3D graphics, audio APIs, offline asset storage, and combined support for the most popular web browsers. From online casinos to fun games, this mobility-friendly technology is just the perfect match for today’s game consumers.Benefits of Developing Games in Html5Cross Platform Accessibility:HTML 5 offers the flexibility and portability of the games in multiple devices without a tweak in the code. It stands true to its promise of coding once and deploy everywhere that means the same piece of code would run on any device (hardware) and operating system (software).Ease of Framework:HTML 5 is the most preferred gaming tool for the versatility, flexibility and compatibility it offers that allows the developers to tap into uncharted territories with the best tools at disposal.No plug-ins neededDodge the nagging pop ins requesting to download the plug-ins with HTML5 gaming engine. There’s no need for extra plug-ins in HTML5 as that of Flash or Unity. A brief preload is all it takes to boot the game.It’s the futureHTML5 is not going anywhere anytime soon. With more and more elements getting adopted more and more companies will start to develop in HTML5. It is indeed the future.Given these scintillating advantages of the budding platform more and more companies and game developers are making their way to learn and implement HTML5 in their books of code. Considering the market flooded with all the itsy-bitsy games, it becomes a daunting task to choose a high-quality brain stimulating concept of game that not just focus on engagement but actually delves deeper to hone the skills of strategic thinking, reflex reactions, decision making, confidence boosting and many such personality traits.Creating an engrossing game is no amateur thing mastered in a day by the naive programmers binging on the html5 gaming tutorials but it is a piece of art created by experts of different talents who come together to paint the canvas. In the list of top Browser Game Development Studios Genieee secures an admirable position for its commendable work in developing and deploying HTML5 browser games leading the way for its competitors unveiling new possibilities of the arena.Genieee is one of the Top Browser Game Development Studios worldwide that has been serving some of the best quality and concept-driven gaming strategies for more than 10 years. Whether you craze for the fast-paced racing games, heart-pounding first person shooters, or edge-of-your-seat tower defense games, Genieee has to offer quite a diverse collection of games that would keep you on the toes with the unforeseen twists and twirls along the way.Genieee’s strategic masterminds behind each game focus on tantalizing the cognitive functioning of your brain by throwing unfathomable challenges and hindrances that are not just fun to decode and conquer but also forces you to ace your thinking, speed and decision making tactics.Genieee is a powerhouse of artistic talents and out-of-the-box strategists who come together to design and code some of the best pieces of entertainment. The company’s R&D team rigorously analyses the market and experiments with the cutting-edge technology for tomorrow’s browser games, ensuring that the company continues to set trends in the future.Their diverse portfolio of games is painted with many categories like Puzzle & Strategy Games, Action & Arcade Games, Educational & Sports Games and much more that caters to a wide audience. Keeping up with the pace of the changing demands and choices of the consumers, Genieee keeps an eagle-eye on the latest updates on the technology and market and comes up with the latest trend setters in its realm.Being a Top Browser Game Development Studios Genieee strives to be a path-breaker and leader in delivering the best experience of the virtual reality. With their great flow of streamlined processes, exemplary management of each project, and an army of exceptional talents, Genieee offers the best resources to turn your idea into a concept and a concept into a virtual reality.
  2. Hi everyone. For the last few months I’ve been working on a simple HTML5 2D side scrolling action game called Theraxius. It's nothing new and revolutionary, it's more like an evolution of different technology (combination of HTML5, PHP, MySQL). The game also includes a level editor so you can create your own levels. The game and the level editor is written almost completely in JavaScript, no download is required. Just load and play. Here are a few screenshots and the link to the page. In the next weeks I’ll try to post some videos, try to add registration (for newsletter and later for public test). Release date: when it's done theraxius.com
  3. Hi There! I would like to present to you our newest game, Coal Burnout! Play the demo version in your browser here https://beardsvibe.com Beat your competition in Multiplayer PVP, throw coal in the rhythm game, upgrade trains, get first in the leaderboard, and all this while listening to awesome chiptune soundtrack written by skybox! The game features iconic trains from steam era: - Flying Scotsman - DHR 778 - 4468 Mallard - GER Class Y14 - BR Standard Class Available now in the AppStore and the Google Play. - https://itunes.apple.com/us/app/coal-burnout/id1200548201?mt=8 - https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.beardsvibe.stoker - https://skyboxchip.bandcamp.com/
  4. The first implementation of DRTS came in form of a windows application. While the windows app did its job, I felt uncomfortable with the bottleneck resulting from depending on windows as a platform. To lower this barrier, I started developing a version to run in web-browsers. The web app has come a long way since then, offering an interactive tutorial and playing with bots. The update released today expands the web app by support for playing with other people online. To play the game, head over to play.drtsgame.com Starting today, the web app there also offers to join another player for a game. The video below demonstrates the new feature, using two different web-browsers: Under The Hood - Rendering Efficiency And Visibility Changes Also with this update, visibility of the game world is changed in several ways: The computation of visibility is reimplemented using a new algorithm to be more efficient in common scenarios. This change drastically improved frame rates in Firefox, Edge, and Chrome. Symmetry for view propagation along edges: With the new algorithm, visibility is changed for symmetry between pairs of nodes. This means that viewing along an edge always works in both directions, regardless of the travel direction of the edge. When the game is over, the complete game world is revealed to all players.
  5. Hello there! I'd like to show you my new game - Hurry Birdie. It's an endless game where you have to dodge tree brunches and stones falling from above. Your birdie flies from side to side and speeds up when you press the screen. Features: * Nice design; * You can unlock new birdies; * Easy to play; * Leaderboard; * Good timekiller. Download here: iOS: https://itunes.apple.com/app/id1434970622?mt=8 Android: https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.abdullakh.hurrybirdie
  6. Greedy Goblin

    State Changes

    Games usually (if not always) require some way to manage state changes... and I'm sure most of you (if not all of you) know far more about State Machines than I do. And I'm certain that I could learn a heck of lot from reading up about the subject to build a state machine that works beautifully and makes my code look amazing etc etc. Pfft.. never mind all that... I'm building this game 'off the cuff' as it were, making it up as I go along and following the principle of 'I build what I need when I need it and only insofar that it adequately fulfils the requirements at that time'. I don't try to plan ahead (not in any granular sense anyway), I'm not building a reusable one-size-fits-all game engine, I'm not trying to make the code beautfiul, or win any awards or even make any money from the darn thing. It just needs to perform well enough for what I want it to do. So my immediate requirement is that I have a way to manage the player switching from walking to running to whatever. If I can use it elsewhere for other things then great... and I'll be honest, I do like reusable code so I tend to naturally sway toward that. What I'm trying to avoid is getting myself stuck in a rut, spending weeks/months deliberating over the smallest details because it's got to be 'perfect' and then realising I've still got 99.5% of the game to build! Quick and dirty is OK in my world. I often approach things from a top-down perspective. This boils down to: 'How do I want to instruct the computer to do x, y or z?' So for this particular requirement, how do I want to instruct the game that the player can change from walking to running and running to walking, or walking/running to falling (assuming I make that a player state - which I do), but not from sleeping to running for example? Hell, I don't even know all the states that I want yet, but these are the ones I have a feel for so far: Walking Running Skiiing Driving Falling Drowning Sleeping Eating Introducing 'When' I thought it might be nice to be able to write something like this in my player setup: // Configure valid player state transitions When( this.playerState ).changes().from( PLAYER_STATES.WALKING ).to( PLAYER_STATES.RUNNING ).then( function () { } ); When( this.playerState ).changes().from( PLAYER_STATES.RUNNING ).to( PLAYER_STATES.WALKING ).then( function () { } ); When( this.playerState ).changes().from( PLAYER_STATES.WALKING ).to( PLAYER_STATES.SKIING ).then( function () { } ); When( this.playerState ).changes().from( PLAYER_STATES.SKIING ).to( PLAYER_STATES.WALKING ).then( function () { } ); When( this.playerState ).changes().from( PLAYER_STATES.WALKING, PLAYER_STATES.RUNNING, PLAYER_STATES.SKIING ).to( PLAYER_STATES.FALLING ).then( function () { } ); There's probably a library for something like this out there, but heck, where's the fun in that?! So I create a new 'Stateful' object that represents a state (in this case the playerState) and it's allowed transitions and a 'When' function so I can write the code exactly as above: const Stateful = function () { } Stateful.isStateful = function ( obj ) { return obj.constructor && obj.constructor.name === Stateful.name; } Stateful.areEqual = function ( v1, v2 ) { return v1.equals ? v1.equals( v2 ) : v1 == v2; } Stateful.prototype = { constructor: Stateful, set: function ( v ) { let newState = typeof ( v ) === "function" ? new v() : v; for ( let i = 0; i < this.transitions.length; i++ ) { let transition = this.transitions[i]; if ( transition && typeof ( transition.callback ) === "function" ) { let fromMatch = Stateful.areEqual( transition.vFrom, this ); let toMatch = Stateful.areEqual( transition.vTo, newState ); if ( fromMatch && toMatch ) { // We can only change to the new state if a valid transition exists. this.previousState = Object.assign( Object.create( {} ), this ); Object.assign( this, newState ); transition.callback( this.previousState, this ); } } } }, transitions: Object.create( Object.assign( Array.prototype, { from: function ( vFrom ) { this.vFrom = typeof ( vFrom ) === "function" ? new vFrom() : vFrom; return this; }, to: function ( vTo ) { this.vTo = typeof ( vTo ) === "function" ? new vTo() : vTo; return this; }, remove: function ( fn ) { this.vFrom = this.vFrom === undefined ? { equals: function () { return true; } } : this.vFrom; this.vTo = this.vTo === undefined ? { equals: function () { return true; } } : this.vTo; for ( let i = 0; i < this.length; i++ ) { let transition = this[i]; let fromMatch = Stateful.areEqual( this.vFrom, transition.vFrom ); let toMatch = Stateful.areEqual( this.vTo, transition.vTo ); let fnMatch = fn === undefined ? true : transition.callback == fn; if ( fromMatch && toMatch & fnMatch ) { delete this[i]; } } } } ) ) } function When( statefulObj ) { if ( !Stateful.isStateful( statefulObj ) ) { throw "Argument must be a Stateful object"; } return { changes: function () { return { from: function ( ...vFrom ) { this.vFrom = vFrom; return this; }, to: function ( ...vTo ) { this.vTo = vTo; return this; }, then: function ( fn ) { if ( typeof ( fn ) === "function" ) { this.vFrom = this.vFrom === undefined ? [true] : this.vFrom; this.vTo = this.vTo === undefined ? [true] : this.vTo; for ( let i = 0; i < this.vFrom.length; i++ ) { for ( let j = 0; j < this.vTo.length; j++ ) { statefulObj.transitions.push( { vFrom: typeof ( this.vFrom[i] ) === "function" ? new this.vFrom[i]() : this.vFrom[i], vTo: typeof ( this.vTo[j] ) === "function" ? new this.vTo[j]() : this.vTo[j], callback: fn } ); } } } else { throw "Supplied argument must be a function"; } } }; } } } I drop the aforementioned 'When' statements into my Player setup and remove the old 'If' statements that were previously controlling changes between walking and running and insert the new playerState.set() calls where appropriate. e.g. "run": ( pc, keyup ) => { if ( keyup ) { _this.player.playerState.set( PLAYER_STATES.WALKING ); } else { _this.player.playerState.set( PLAYER_STATES.RUNNING ); } } And it seems to work! (Yes I was actually surprised by that) 😂 TheBerg-StateChanges.mp4 p.s. I've switched to using Bandicam for screen capture as it seems far superior to what I was using previously.
  7. Val Valentino

    Browser Game Fishes

    I've developed a browser game that I do not intend to sell and I'm looking for an investor to help me with advertising and upgrading. Languages: PHP7, HTML, JS, Jquery Database: MySQL FrameWork: Laravel Anyone who wants more information, write on PM
  8. Hello game developers, after I created primitive clones of Pong and Snake I want to begin my first own project. I am looking for beginners who want to help me and get some experience on working as a game development team. Here is a live demo (you can play in your browser) of a multiplayer space game i started this week. Its currently in a development state thats good to get involved because now its just a frame where you can fly around with your ship and see other players. I need ideas where to go from here... thats why i share it now and look for contributers. Its made with JavaScript If you are interested in contacting me, reply to the post, private message me or send me a mail to michael.midleja@gmail.com I was not sure if i should post it in "Hobby Project Classifieds", but i want to adress beginners like me, so i posted it here. Have a good day, Michael
  9. Greedy Goblin

    Slopey McSlopeface (part 2)

    Having played around with the character movement a bit more I realised I was doing many things wrong. Not that I had ever intended to do things perfectly, but the slope handling just wasn't up to scratch. I had acceleration working, but deceleration didn't due to the way I had built things. So I decided to do a little bit of an overhaul of the player movement system. Nothing too major it turns out but I now have both acceleration and deceleration working very nicely and it gives a much smoother feel to the controls. It's subtle but necessary in my opinion. There is one aspect of slopes that I haven't tackled yet though and that is falling, tumbling or sliding on steep slopes. As I'm not using any fancy physics engine my player character is essentially glued to the terrain like it's on rails. It's not really an issue in so far as jumping is concerned because I don't intend to have any jumping ability in the game. However, I decided that I didn't want to artificially prevent the player from walking off the edge of a cliff so I need some form of falling action (and tumbling if you run down a steep slope too fast - potentially injuring yourself). So what I've done is add forces into my CollisionBody class to represent an accelerant force due to gravity. But to keep my brain from imploding over the quirks of simulating physics (and so as not to have to implement a full-blown physics engine) I decided to half keep the on-rails aspect by doing this: if ( obj.collisionBody.position.y <= targetPos.y ) { obj.collisionBody.position.y = targetPos.y; obj.collisionBody.resetForces(); } else { // Apply gravity obj.collisionBody.applyForce( new Force( DEFAULT_VECTORS.down, _this.gAcceleration ) ); } Where 'targetPos' is the ground position. So if the player is in contact with the ground or moves below it, then they player will just snap back to the precise point on the terrain. It's only when the player goes above the terrain (into the air) that gravity comes into play. This helps keep things nice and simple and gives a nice feel to the movement. Oh and I've also added in some 'head-bobbing' to add a bit of realism to the movement. Overall it gives a really nice result.... and I can now fall off cliffs... You may also notice that the camera rotation is now much smoother too as I now 'slerp' between rotations rather than doing absolute movements, although my screen recording software doesn't do it justice in the video above.
  10. Feedback on earlier versions showed that new players often had a hard time beating the bot at first. To fix this, I introduced easier levels of difficulty. These support a gradual progression to more challenging opponents. When playing with a bot, you can now pick a difficulty level before starting the game. To make this as simple as possible, the game automatically recommends a bot based on the results of previous games. After finishing a game, the difficulty level is displayed again to put the result into context. This release also fixes an issue discovered by Hugo in December: The game now displays traces of defeated units for a while, to clarify where those units went, even when you were focused on another part of the map at the time the unit was defeated. The October release of DRTS is now live, you can play the game at https://play.drtsgame.com Many thanks to all the people who helped to test and make this a solid release!
  11. I am working on a multiplayer real-time strategy game. This game focuses on the core of real-time strategy, forgoing resource gathering, base building, and unit types. Play against bots or meet other people online to play a match. You can play it in your web browser on https://play.drtsgame.com Note that the camera controls are not yet explained in the tutorial. Here is how to control the camera: Camera panning: Hold down right mouse button and drag to move the camera Camera Zoom: Use the mouse wheel to zoom.
  12. Greedy Goblin

    Into The Berg

    So here we are. I'm not a seasoned blogger, or skilled game dev or any such thing. Social media is, in my opinion, a bit of a pain, so don't be expecting regular daily updates or anything like that. They'll happen when they happen. This project (The Berg) is just my idea of fun in my spare time. I didn't want to use any fancy game engines or integrate a full-blown physics engine. The idea is to keep it retro, as simple as possible while still creating something that a) looks fairly decent and b) is fun(ish) to play. I have no idea how this is going to turn out, or if it will ever get completed but we'll all have a good old laugh at my incompetance along the way I'm sure. 😜 Anyway, so I already got part way in to building this thing and thought 'Hey, here's a really dumb idea, why not blog about it for a laugh and waste more of my precious spare time!'. Awesome! So what I have so far is a simple Node/ExpressJS/ThreeJS set up in VS Code and I've created the island geometry from a 2D texture passed into a custom vertex shader which takes a flat subdivided plane and applies a displacement to each vertex based on the appropriate UV co-ords. I want to keep a retro look and feel so this isn't some smooth terrain; it's full of lovely flat shaded triangle-y goodness. So I created a terrain height map in Gimp (with the help of an online island generator tool for the contour -> http://exupero.org/hazard/post/islands/). The real size is 2048 x 2048. I want to create something on the larger scale here! Once my Node/ThreeJS setup was up and running, I built a Terrain class (this is all in Javascript by the way) and set about loading the texture using the ThreeJS loaders and passing it through to my terrain vertex displacement shader. P.S. The terrain shader took me a while to figure out. Initially it didn't work quite as expected but eventually I got there. Essentially I pass the player position to the shader and only sample a smaller portion of the heighmap depending on what view distance I want. So I'm only ever rendering a small sub-section of the heightmap which changes as the player moves. This was easier said than done... in my head at least. In the end it looks something like this... float step = viewSize / subdivisions; vec2 pp = vec2(playerPos.x, -playerPos.z); vec2 adjPlayerPos = floor(pp / step) * step; vec2 remainderPP = pp - adjPlayerPos; float uvScale = viewSize / mapSize; vec2 uvOffset = vec2(adjPlayerPos + (mapSize / 2.) - (viewSize / 2.)) / mapSize; vec2 newUV = uvOffset + uv * uvScale; vec4 dm = texture2D(heightMap, newUV); vec3 newPos = vec3( position.x - remainderPP.x, position.y - remainderPP.y, dm.r * heightScale ); vec3 transformed = newPos; Sheesh! That looks... err... complicated, but it gives a great result....
  13. Greedy Goblin

    Slopey McSlopeface (part 1)

    Hmmm, I love sausage rolls. Oh sorry, just having a tasty sausage roll for my lunch while thinking about the problem of... slopes. So I have this nice terrain an' all, that I can now walk around on. But those hills aren't exactly challenging my player character. I breeze up those as easily as I descend a vertical drop. Why is that? Because I'm just making the player follow the terrain like it's on rails, that's why! No fancy pants physics engines here guv. I need to make the player ascend steep inclines more slowly than flat terrain and also come to a halt against any vertical, or near-vertical inclines. I also need to make the player fall or tumble if they attempt to go down any incline too steep... but that's for another blog. I first messed around with attempting to stop the player if they tried to walk up anything with a gradient over a certain threshold... that didn't work out too well. Lots of jittery movement ensued. Then I realised my approach was all wrong! When I climb a steep hill, I don't just come to a dead stop in reality, I just move more slowly as I ascend. So this just became a case of factoring in the terrain gradient to my player speed... simples! // Test slope in direction of travel let direction = new THREE.Vector3().copy( this.collisionBody.resolveMoves().normalize() ); let p1 = new THREE.Vector3().copy( this.position ); let intersection1 = _this.terrain.heightAt( p1.x, p1.z ); let p2 = new THREE.Vector3().addVectors( this.position, direction ); let intersection2 = _this.terrain.heightAt( p2.x, p2.z ); let grad = intersection2.h - intersection1.h; _this.playerController.currentSpeed = Math.clamp( -_this.playerController.DEFAULT_SPEEDS.WALKING * grad + _this.playerController.DEFAULT_SPEEDS.WALKING, 0, 2 ); Works a treat.... except (sigh) when I'm up against a near vertical incline. I can still climb those, just a bit more slowly (sigh). In fact, no, this doesn't look right at all. The graident should be so large when approaching a near vertical incline that it should reduce my speed to 0. But for some reason I get this.... TheBerg-SlopeyMcSlopeface-01.mp4 Much head scratching ensued! Then I realised it must be something to do with the order of processing. The way I handle movement is through a "CollisionBody" object which is attached to the player. I call a "move" function on the CollisionBody which basically stores it in an array until the "PhysicsManager" decides to resolve it (reminder: there is no fancy physics going on at all yet... I just decided to call it a PhysicsManager). The thing is, my PlayerController was calling "move" before I had changed my speed to zero, so the movement vectors were already baked in (I know, I know, this is getting complicated already!) and changing the speed did nothing. Each alternate frame I was then resetting my speed back to normal walking speed.... You know, it's only when I write all that down I see just how crazy dumb it was! 😂 So I decided on an alternative approach. Instead of setting an absolute velocity vector when calling CollisionBody.move I now pass a direction vector and speed as a new Velocity object... however... the speed doesn't have to be a number... it can be a function! Thereby I can delay the resolution of the velocity until absolutely necessary (i.e. when the PhysicsManager needs to apply the moves). It may sound complicated but I quite like it. I can then make any other adjustments to the speed (not velocity) during the frame update and it will take effect when the PhysicsManager resolves everything! e.g. PlayerController handles movement -> player.collisionBody.move( new Velocity( direction, () => player.speed ) Player object "update" tests for slopes and adjusts speed accordingly PhysicsManager "update" resolves all player.collisionBody movements, in turn resolving all Velocity values using the new updated speed rather than the speed as it was in step 1 So how does this work out now? TheBerg-SlopeyMcSlopeface-02.mp4 Better... if you watch very closely you might notice I've added in a subtle acceleration too which gives a smoother feel to the player movement (later I'll add in head bobbing). However, I'm still not entirely happy with it. When you stop the player doesn't decelerate, but comes to an abrupt stop... which is fine but feels a little unnatural. Near vertical inclines are also handled better, although I still find with the "right" movements I can still climb them so I definitely need to work on this more. Acceleration is done by adding in a targetSpeed property on the Player, so the actual speed will accelerate towards that speed until it is reached. It does decelerate too as the incline increases, but when you lift your key from the keyboard the direction vector is reset to {0, 0, 0} so the speed has no effect. I'll have a think a bit more about this later. Ideas and suggestions are welcome!
  14. Game developers will be able to become pioneers in the development of decentralized games for the gambling industry using DAO.Casino protocol. On September 17, 2018, DAO.Casino is opening Sandbox for developers, independent teams and game development studios that choose to harness the power of the rapidly developing DApp industry. Starting today everyone may submit their application for Sandbox on the official Sandbox page. The Sandbox project is designed by DAO.Casino developers. Participants of Sandbox will learn the basics of decentralized applications development on DAO.Casino protocol. Developers participating in Sandbox will learn to create, design and deploy decentralized games and applications on Ethereum blockchain. DAO.Casino is planning to reward most active developers for their constructive feedback on the improvement and optimization of the SDK and related documentation. The company will separately announce the details of the rewards program later this fall. “We are confident that the Sandbox project will play an important role in our collaboration with studios and independent game developers. We cannot wait to see our product helping developers unleash their creative and entrepreneurial talents and apply those to one of the most groundbreaking technologies of the XXI century. — states Ilya Tarutov, CEO, DAO.Casino. – I am sure that the products we’re developing will transform the online gambling into a fair and transparent industry for all of the involved parties: casino operators, developers, and affiliate marketers. “ “We are launching the Sandbox with the goal of enabling as many developers as possible to learn to create decentralized games. We have achieved an important milestone by starting to accept applications from developers all around the world who share our idea to make online gambling fair and transparent. With our technology, developers can take the whole gambling industry to the next level” – says Alexandra Fetisova from DAO.Casino. DAO.Casino is disrupting the online gambling industry by developing the protocol based on Ethereum blockchain technology. The protocol ensures the automation of transactions and facilitates interactions between all the industry participants: casino operators, game developers, and affiliate marketers. DAO.Casino team is fully dedicated to developing the best products and making the gambling industry a better place. View full story
  15. Game developers will be able to become pioneers in the development of decentralized games for the gambling industry using DAO.Casino protocol. On September 17, 2018, DAO.Casino is opening Sandbox for developers, independent teams and game development studios that choose to harness the power of the rapidly developing DApp industry. Starting today everyone may submit their application for Sandbox on the official Sandbox page. The Sandbox project is designed by DAO.Casino developers. Participants of Sandbox will learn the basics of decentralized applications development on DAO.Casino protocol. Developers participating in Sandbox will learn to create, design and deploy decentralized games and applications on Ethereum blockchain. DAO.Casino is planning to reward most active developers for their constructive feedback on the improvement and optimization of the SDK and related documentation. The company will separately announce the details of the rewards program later this fall. “We are confident that the Sandbox project will play an important role in our collaboration with studios and independent game developers. We cannot wait to see our product helping developers unleash their creative and entrepreneurial talents and apply those to one of the most groundbreaking technologies of the XXI century. — states Ilya Tarutov, CEO, DAO.Casino. – I am sure that the products we’re developing will transform the online gambling into a fair and transparent industry for all of the involved parties: casino operators, developers, and affiliate marketers. “ “We are launching the Sandbox with the goal of enabling as many developers as possible to learn to create decentralized games. We have achieved an important milestone by starting to accept applications from developers all around the world who share our idea to make online gambling fair and transparent. With our technology, developers can take the whole gambling industry to the next level” – says Alexandra Fetisova from DAO.Casino. DAO.Casino is disrupting the online gambling industry by developing the protocol based on Ethereum blockchain technology. The protocol ensures the automation of transactions and facilitates interactions between all the industry participants: casino operators, game developers, and affiliate marketers. DAO.Casino team is fully dedicated to developing the best products and making the gambling industry a better place.
  16. Dear community, I would like inform you that "War IOM" v2 have been re-work graphics and added more feature to serve user experience. Here is my banner screenshot: You can access to the website and play it directly on your phone (Chrome mobile, Safari iPhone, iPad) or your Laptop Link to play: https://www.iomgame.com/wariom/ ++++ Game description: The rule to win the game is very simple: buy the soldiers, defeat the enemy army and then destroys the flag. Try to use fireball to wipe out the enemy. The game had the shop to buy new soldier, upgrade soldier and choose the team out. Game data be stored on both user's device and server so never lost data again. ++++ Here is the look and feel of War IOM icon on your Home-screen phone Rumor: You can get double gem receive if you beat the mini boss at level 3. Also win level 3 will give you a lot of Gem, use it to buy new solider and upgrade your army! My facebook page: https://www.facebook.com/Iomgame-245553622715070/ /******** Change log update 08/26 ********/ -- Add new game play for level 6. -- Improve camera. -- Improve game performance. /******** Change log update 08/31 ********/ -- Improve sound load time. No painful for waiting sound loading any more! /******** Change log update 19/09 ********/ -- Add level 7 with new game play. Regards, Gafami
  17. I've created a HTML5 2D canvas game and I'm now ready to take the step and convert it to a native Android (and iOS) app. The game works perfectly fine in any desktop or mobile browser. Animations are fast and smooth. After some research, I decided Cordova was the way to go to create native apps for Android and iOS. My first priority is Android, simply because I have an Android phone myself and I don't have a Mac (which apparently is required to build iOS apps). I have looked at Cocoon.io and although that might be an even better option than Cordova (since it's actually build on top of Cordova), the thing that made me run from it is the fact that it costs $500 just to remove the "build with Cocoon" splash screen... After installing all prerequisites (cordova, Android Studio, nodes.js) building my first APK was easy. When I ran my game in the Android emulator, the game was abysmally slow... Testing it on my device yielded the same slow results. After searching the internet, I figured it was because on some devices, an old and slow WebView is used by native apps to display HTML5 content. Still strange since my phone uses Android 7.0.0 and the emulator uses Android 8.0.0... I quickly found FastCanvas, a PhoneGap/Cordova plugin that adds a very fast canvas "compatible" rendering surface. But it was last updated in 2013 and after trying to get it to work for almost 16 hours straight, I came to the conclusion there's no way to get this to work with the current version of Cordova. I then found CrossWalk-WebView. This too was pretty old and a pain to get it to work with the current version of Cordova. And when I did get it to work, I quickly found out it created a few new problems making my game unplayable (noticeably a strange lag when touching the screen. Not the famous 300ms input lag, but after touching the screen, the entire game would freeze for 200ms-300ms). So I had to give up on Crosswalk as well. So now I am at a loss. Can anyone offer me suggestions on how to speed up canvas rendering in Cordova? It's pretty darn frustrating that my HTML5 game is finished and I'm ready for publication, only to find out that's not as easy everyone says it is... (BTW, I've posted the same question on a few other forums to reach as many game developers as possible.)
  18. I recently finished a very comprehensive series on how to make games with Pico-8. I walk through the entire process of developing a polished Breakout/Arkanoid clone from start to finish. I assume absolutely ZERO programming experience. Let me know what you think!
  19. i have a problem i can make work the verificay if user existe our not i using nodejs ,express,mysql i put my link to project in github the code its to big https://github.com/Kammikazy/project find the soluction to my problem
  20. Just like applications, games will be migrated to the browser as well. In order to understand the forces that will make this transition happen, we need to understand what makes the Internet, the browsers and websites so successful in the first place, and why is that relevant in the context of games. Bit of History There is always a reason why a trend develops and decays over time. It's more than just excitement then later on boredom. In the beginning, all the application were developed for the mainframes first, because at the time no single person could afford a computer. Then the PC came along and everything got rewritten for that platform. Then just recently, internet speed, hardware and browsers become fast enough to run the apps we use in the office to trigger another wave of application migration, back to the cloud. Think about Microsoft Office Online. Improvements on the hardware level will disrupt trends build on top of it. The Bias When a new technology comes along, people tend to focus on the downsides only and argue that the new tech never going to be as good as the old one. The reasonable question would be, what are the downsides and what are the upsides and what the new technology allows me to do and can I live with the downsides. Change is difficult, therefore people tend to stick to the old tech. New customers who are exposed to competing products the first time, evaluate the old and the new tech objectively and then make a decision. People tend to confuse the principles that brought a trend to live with the current state of those trends. They say: yes, but at the moment X can’t do what Y can. A set of features was used to create a popular app, service or game, a different set of features will produce a different product. The new product doesn’t have to be superior in every way in order to succeed. Not as Black and White as we’d like it to be When PC was introduced it wasn’t as fast as consoles at the time. People argued that it's not good for gaming. Today it's the other way around. Nintendo Switch was released with 1 teraflop performance on a market where the competition was PS 4 Pro - 4.2 teraflop - and XBox One X - 6 teraflop and become one the fastest selling consoles of all times. Clearly, there was more to the story than just performance. After all, why do even consoles exist when they are inferior to the PC. So what are the upsides of gaming in the browser and what do we have to put up with? Upsides: Instant Gaming - fast as loading up a website Cross play - No need to convince your friends to buy the same console to play the same games together. Seamless Updates - No delayed gaming sessions because a new 30GB update just got released. Low Resistance - When something is only one click away, it's more likely to give it a try. One Standard - Porting Games is unnecessary. If you have a browser, you have access to the game. Downsides: Limited Graphics - Web standards are behind the cutting edge APIs available on other platforms. Fast Internet Required - You need a reasonably good internet speed. E.g.: 4G on your phone. Deviation from Standards - Some browser vendors make it difficult for devs to use the same codebase. Conclusion We probably going to see a form of merger in the long run. Apps will merge with websites and the same goes for games, and they partly already did on mobile devices. It's not the question of better or worse, or whether it will provide a better experience for everybody or not. It's more about what will become mainstream? When most people sit down to play a game, what device they will reach out to and what platform will deliver most games? Feel free to disagree and leave a comment below if you have something to say
  21. THE PROJECT INT is a 3D Sci-fi RPG with a strong emphasis on story, role playing, and innovative RPG features such as randomized companions. The focus is on the journey through a war-torn world with fast-paced combat against hordes of enemies. The player must accomplish quests like a traditional RPG, complete objectives, and meet lively crew members who will aid in the player's survival. Throughout the game you can side and complete missions through criminal cartels, and the two major combatants, the UCE and ACP, of the Interstellar Civil War. Please note that all of our current positions are remote work. You will not be required to travel. For more information about us, follow the links listed below. INT Official website Steam Greenlight IndieDB page Also follow social media platforms for the latest news regarding our projects. Facebook Twitter Website Administrator We are seeking a talented and keen Web Administrator. The Web Admin will perform periodic updates, improve the design of the official website and enhance user experience of online content, including a web comic and blogs. Your duties include: 1. Manage online content for company website. 2. Enhance existing aesthetics and user experience for web properties. 3. Work with team leads to institute content calendar for company website. 4. Help implement strategies to increase website traffic. 5. Proofread content. 6. Remain current with emerging web technologies. 7. Attend weekly remote team meeting. REQUIREMENTS To be successful in this position, following requirements apply: HTML, WordPress, CSS expertise. SEO basics Outstanding communication skills. Ability to complete tasks remotely without supervision. REVENUE-SHARE This is a great opportunity to get into the game development industry. Being an Indie team we do not have the creative restrictions often imposed by publishers or other third parties. We are extremely conscientious of our work and continuously uphold a high level of quality throughout our project. We are unable to offer wages or per-item payments at this time. However revenue-sharing from crowd-funding is offered to team members who contribute 15-20 hours per week to company projects, as well as maintain constant communication and adhere to deadlines. Your understanding is dearly appreciated. TO APPLY Please send your Cover Letter, CV, Portfolio (if applicable), and other relevant documents/information to this email: JohnHR@int-game.net Thank you for your time! Please feel free to contact me via the email provided should you have any questions or are interested to apply for this position. We look forward to hearing from you! John Shen HR Lead Starboard Games LLC
  22. Sir StevenK

    [HTML5] Monster Tycoon

    Hi, I begin in the creation of video games and I have just published my first "big" project. You can test it on https://www.kongregate.com/games/IndieBaie/monster-tycoon Don't hesitate to share your feedback.
  23. In early 2017 I had this idea, if I can stream an HD movie without downloading the whole thing, I could stream a massive open world game as well without downloading it. Most people are under the impression that a game running in the browser can’t look good because then it takes forever to load it. Well, in game dev the concept of LOD - Level Of Details - exists quite a while now, there is no reason why we couldn’t apply it in the browser as well. The game I developed loads in a matter of seconds. It takes a couple seconds to load the engine itself, then when you press play: - Loads the terrain peaces closer to you first, than what's further away. - Loads the low poly version of the models like trees, rocks and bushes first, then the high poly version when available. - Structures... - Animals... - Sound... - Etc.. you get the idea My point is, it is POSSIBLE to build a 3D version of the Internet, where instead of browsing through websites, we could jump from one 3D space to the next. I “invite” everyone to make this happen. I’ve made a 3D Survival Game with a massive terrain to prove the tech works. I want you guys to build your own 3D spaces implementing your own ideas what the web should look like in the future. We could just link them all together and make this Interconnected Virtual Space happen - yeah, the Metaverse, for the Snow Crash fans out there I would love to hear what you think about the applications of 3D spaces on the Web. Please leave me a comment if you are as exited about the possibilities as I am. Backing up my claims: Live Tech Demo is available on https://plainsofvr.com Watch a the Open World to load instantly, than gradually improving:
  24. I just published the first release of Freemake. You can test it at https://distilledgames.itch.io/freemake So far, it is more a tech demo than a game, only allowing you to walk around the initial map design shown earlier. Your chars current position is indicated by the black circle. To move through the world, click or tap on an adjacent node. To ensure a smooth presentation of in-game movements, I implemented a camera, which follows the player around. The implementation is based on the camera in DRTS but simplified since some features are not (yet) needed in Freemake. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3jC5Rdu9hpw So far, I spent 23 hours on this project in total.
  25. Awoken

    Finished & Post Mortem

    Please check out my project page to play Shapes Tower Defense You can play it on GameDev! A Huge thank you to all those who've helped me out with this game. There were quite a number of us encouraging each-other along and I thought, and think, that that is just fantastic. POST MORTEM On the outset I was hoping to spend a lot of time on the game play. But I wasn't able to devote as much time to game play as I would have liked. In the future I think at least 50% of development time, if not more, should be spent play testing and tweaking. But Over-all I'm quite satisfied with my implementation of the ideas I set out with in my first blog regarding this project. Came together quite nicely. I think all of my years of experience with THREE.js helped me fast track many of the steps that maybe new-comers to the API would have to learn the hard way. What went Right: Using my own 3D program helped out tremendously, I don't think I could have created all the unique shapes ( over 30 ) if not for that. I think there is value in creating your own 2D and 3D suits. though they would be much much simpler, you can create them to suit you needs. Expected development time and debugging was quite accurate, I'm surprised. I enjoyed making this game a lot, and I think the part I enjoyed the most was looking up Johnson Solids and making them. What went Wrong: Like lawnjelly said, gimp is a nightmare. I'm a bit more familiar with it now but what I've learned about that beast is that it's probably incredibly easy for those who know what hot keys their pressing, but for me, a Microsoft paint wiz, it was terrible. I didn't devote as much time to game play as I was expecting to. And game play is a whole different animal. I'm so used to technical problem solving that switching over your mind set to deal with something as ambiguous and subjective as game play was a challenge, especially since I only gave myself 5 days to do it. But thankfully lawnjelly was a big help and he pointed out a lot of design flaws that I had over-looked. I think I got most of them that he mentioned. My code, It's bad. I documented things as best I could and tried to label things but once the complexity of this project grew I could no longer keep things tidy or orderly. Sure I named variables 'vectorOne' instead of 'v' but the code lacks coherent structure. By the end I was confused as to where I had put things. Clearly much work to be done in this area. All and all I enjoyed the experience a lot, and I became closer with some members. Win / Win Have a great weekend. Awoken
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