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Found 17 results

  1. Glecko

    PC [MMORPG] Ruthless Chaos

    The online RPG Ruthless Chaos is a 100% free2play game, created by Kelstar Entertainment. If you think that you got what’s needed for the most exciting adventure ever, this is your game! Do you remember the first time you played an RPG? That unique feeling when going into unexplored dungeons and enjoyed discovering the most mysterious places you could ever imagine? We want to give you that RPG-feeling back. Level up and gather your friends to become a legend! We are glad to present: Ruthless Chaos - The return of RPG Release Date: Friday, 31st May 2019, at 20:00 CEST (GMT+2) Explore a dynamic world full of secrets where every place means a new challenge. Team up with your friends to complete the over 300 quests you can find along the world.E Enjoy your gaming experience in a comfortable and ever-growing community. Play one of the 5 different vocations and slay hundreds of different creatures. Login every day to complete daily challenges and get special rewards! Fight challenging bosses with scripted AI and find their weaknesses and special abilities. Take part in lots of World Events, Raids and Special Quests which require the cooperation of the whole server. Join the Sarlin Society and aid them in their fight to defeat the Ruthless Seven. Be the first one to defeat this mighty archdemons to be declared winner of the season, and thereby becomming a true legend! Website: http://www.ruthlesschaos.net How to play: Manual Lore Summary Your homeland has been devastated. For centuries, mankind hunted demons, slaughtering their kind and banishing them into the depths of Hell. Until the Ruthless Seven, almighty archdemons, united all the demonic cabals in one crusade against mankind. City after city, the kingdoms of men succumbed to the hordes of demons. In a desperate attempt to survive, a group of heroes sailed off the city of Carlin into the unknown seas to find the unexplored land of Elendia. But peace would not last long, as the demonic army eventually found the new human settlements. Now, a thousands of demons are gathering, preparing for the final strike that will wipe out mankind. And somebody has come up with a plan, a desperate and risky plan. To sneak into the core of Hell itself, and strike the heart of the enemy. To slay the Ruthless Seven. Donations 100% free to play. You will not be forced to pay to fully enjoy the game in any means. However, in order to keep the game alive, we have implemented a Donation system, where you can donate to contribute to the game’s maintenance and development. We are strongly against any kind of Pay2Win system, and that’s why the rewards you can get for donating will not have any impact on the character’s gameplay.
  2. Project Name: Condors Vs. Ocelots Team Size: 15ish Genre:Strategy RPG Engine: Unity Roles Available: Currently in need of 2 2D sprite artists, 2 2D concept artists, and then finally 2 programmers. If you feel as if you can offer the team something more that isn't listed, we are always open to making an exception, just send your resume/portfolio to us! Project Length: Currently planning on release Q1 2020. Compensation: Rev-share Project Description: Condors and Ocelots have been at war for generations. Battles have left some settlements in ruins. Others teem with refugees. Even away from the fighting, towns and villages suffer from having their fighting-age citizens lured away or conscripted by one faction or the other. Banditry is also rife -- since the Condors and Ocelots focus on the front lines, and largely neglect the parts of their respective dominions which aren't militarily important or located near their bases. The mysterious faction, Goatverlords, comes in and antagonizes both claiming rule of the land. They must work together and against one another to win the ultimate struggle. Project Status: Pre-design is completely done and we are starting on development of our builds. Send emails to careers@titanomachystudios.com Our store page can be found here, https://play.google.com/store/apps/developer?id=Titanomachy+Studios Our website here, http://titanomachystudios.com/#/
  3. It's a story on how to write a plugin for Unity Asset Store, take a crack at solving the well-known isometric problems in games, and make a little coffee money from that, and also to understand how expandable Unity editor is. Pictures, code, graphs and thoughts inside. Prologue So, it was one night when I found out I had pretty much nothing to do. The coming year wasn't really promising in my professional life (unlike personal one, though, but that's a whole nother story). Anyway, I got this idea to write something fun for old times sake, that would be quite personal, something on my own, but still having a little commercial advantage (I just like that warm feeling when your project is interesting for somebody else, except for your employer). And all this went hand in hand with the fact that I have long awaited to check out the possibilities of Unity editor extension and to see if there's any good in its platform for selling the engine's own extensions. I devoted one day to studying the Asset Store: models, scripts, integrations with various services. And first, it seemed like everything has already been written and integrated, having even a number of options of different quality and detail levels, just as much as prices and support. So right away I've narrowed it down to: code only (after all, I'm a programmer) 2D only (since I just love 2D and they've just made a decent out-of-the-box support for that in Unity) And then I remembered just how many cactuses I've ate and how many mice've died when we were making an isometric game before. You won't believe how much time we've killed on searching viable solutions and how many copies we've broken in attempts to sort out this isometry and draw it. So, struggling to keep my hands still, I searched by different key and not-so-much-key words and couldn't find anything except a huge pile of isometric art, until I finally decided to make an isometric plugin from scratch. Setting the goals The first I need was to describe in short what problems this plugin was supposed to solve and what use the isometric games developer would make of it. So, the isometry problems are as follows: sorting objects by remoteness in order to draw them properly extension for creation, positioning and displacement of isometric objects in the editor Thus, with the main objectives for the first version formulated, I set myself 2-3 days deadline for the first draft version. Thus couldn't being deferred, you see, since enthusiasm is a fragile thing and if you don't have something ready in the first days, there's a great chance you ruin it. And New Year holidays are not so long as the might seem, even in Russia, and I wanted to release the first version within, like, ten days. Sorting To put it short, isometry is an attempt made by 2D sprites to look like 3D models. That, of course, results in dozens of problems. The main one is that the sprites have to be sorted in the order in which they were to be drawn to avoid troubles with mutual overlapping. On the screenshot you can see how it's the green sprite that is drawn first (2,1), and then the blue one goes (1,1) The screenshot shows the incorrect sorting when the blue sprite's drawn first In this simple case sorting won't be such a problem, and there are going to be options, for example: - sorting by position of Y on the screen, which is (isoX + isoY) * 0.5 + isoZ - drawing from the remotest isometric grid cell from left to right, from top to down [(3,3),(2,3),(3,2),(1,3),(2,2),(3,1),...] - and a whole bunch of other interesting and not really interesting ways They all are pretty good, fast and working, but only in case of such single-celled objects or columns extended in isoZ direction After all, I was interested in more common solution that would work for the objects extended in one coordinate's direction, or even the "fences" which have absolutely no width, but are extended in the same direction as the necessary height. The screenshot shows the right way of sorting extended objects 3x1 and 1x3 with "fences" measuring 3x0 and 0x3 And that's where our troubles begin and put us in place where we have to decide on the way forward: split "multi-celled" objects into "single-celled" ones, i.e. to cut it vertically and then sort the stripes emerged think about the new sorting method, more complicated and interesting I chose the second option, having no particular desire to get into tricky processing of every object, into cutting (even automatic), and special approach to logic. For the record, they used the first way in few famous games like Fallout 1 and Fallout 2. You can actually see those strips if you get into the games' data. So, the second option doesn't imply any sorting criteria. It means that there is no pre-calculated value by which you could sort objects. If you don't believe me (and I guess many people who never worked with isometry don't), take a piece of paper and draw small objects measuring like 2x8 and, for example, 2x2. If you somehow manage to figure out a value for calculation its depth and sorting - just add a 8x2 object and try to sort them in different positions relative to one another. So, there's no such value, but we still can use dependencies between them (roughly speaking, which one's overlapping which) for topological sorting. We can calculate the objects' dependencies by using projections of isometric coordinates on isometric axis. Screenshot shows the blue cube having dependency on the red one Screenshot shows the green cube having dependency on the blue one A pseudocode for dependency determination for two axis (same works with Z-axis): bool IsIsoObjectsDepends(IsoObject obj_a, IsoObject obj_b) { var obj_a_max_size = obj_a.position + obj_a.size; return obj_b.position.x < obj_a_max_size.x && obj_b.position.y < obj_a_max_size.y; } With such an approach we build dependencies between all the objects, passing among them recursively and marking the display Z coordinate. The method is quite universal, and, most importantly, it works. You can read detailed description of this algorithm, for example, here or here. Also they use this kind of approach in popular flash isometric library (as3isolib). And everything was just great except that time complexity of this approach is O(N^2) since we've got to compare every object to every other one in order to create the dependencies. I've left optimization for later versions, having added only lazy re-sorting so that nothing would be sorted until something moves. So we're going to talk about optimization little bit later. Editor extension From now on, I had the following goals: sorting of objects had to work in the editor (not only in a game) there had to be another kind of Gizmos-Arrow (arrows for moving objects) optionally, there would be an alignment with tiles when object's moved sizes of tiles would be applied and set in the isometric world inspector automatically AABB objects are drawn according to their isometric sizes output of isometric coordinates in the object inspector, by changing which we would change the object's position in the game world And all of these goals have been achieved. Unity really does allow to expand its editor considerably. You can add new tabs, windows, buttons, new fields in object inspector. If you want, you can even create a customized inspector for a component of the exact type you need. You can also output additional information in the editor's window (in my case, on AABB objects), and replace standard move gizmos of objects, too. The problem of sorting inside the editor was solved via this magic ExecuteInEditMode tag, which allows to run components of the object in editor mode, that is to do it the same way as in a game. All of these were done, of course, not without difficulties and tricks of all kinds, but there was no single problem that I'd spent more than a couple of hours on (Google, forums and communities sure helped me to resolve all the issues arisen which were not mentioned in documentation). Screenshot shows my gizmos for movement objects within isometric world Release So, I got the first version ready, took the screenshot. I even drew an icon and wrote a description. It's time. So, I set a nominal price of $5, upload the plugin in the store and wait for it to be approved by Unity. I didn't think over the price much, since I didn't really want to earn big money yet. My purpose was to find out if there is a general demand and if it was, I would like to estimate it. Also I wanted to help developers of isometric games who somehow ended up absolutely deprived of opportunities and additions. In 5 rather painful days (I spent about the same time writing the first version, but I knew what I was doing, without further wondering and overthinking, that gave me the higher speed in comparison with people who'd just started working with isometry) I got a response from Unity saying that the plugin was approved and I could already see it in the store, just as well as its zero (so far) sales. It checked in on the local forum, built Google Analytics into the plugin's page in the store and prepared myself to wait the grass to grow. It didn't take very long before first sales, just as feedbacks on the forum and the store came up. For the remaining days of January 12 copies of my plugin have been sold, which I considered as a sign of the public's interest and decided to continue. Optimization So, I was unhappy with two things: Time complexity of sorting - O(N^2) Troubles with garbage collection and general performance Algorithm Having 100 objects and O(N^2) I had 10,000 iterations to make just to find dependencies, and also I'd have to pass all of them and mark the display Z for sorting. There should've been some solution for that. So, I tried a huge number of options, could not sleep thinking about this problem. Anyway, I'm not going to tell you about all the methods I've tried, but I'll describe the one that I've found the best so far. First thing first, of course, we sort only visible objects. What it means is that we constantly need to be know what's in our shot. If there is any new object, we got to add it in the sorting process, and if one of the old one's gone - ignore it. Now, Unity doesn't allow to determine the object's Bounding Box together with its children in the scene tree. Pass over the children (every time, by the way, since they can be added and removed) wouldn't work - too slow. We also can't use OnBecameVisible and other events because these work only for parent objects. But we can get all Renderer components from the necessary object and its children. Of course, it doesn't sound like our best option, but I couldn't find another way, same universal and acceptable by performance. List<Renderer> _tmpRenderers = new List<Renderer>(); bool IsIsoObjectVisible(IsoObject iso_object) { iso_object.GetComponentsInChildren<Renderer>(_tmpRenderers); for ( var i = 0; i < _tmpRenderers.Count; ++i ) { if ( _tmpRenderers[i].isVisible ) { return true; } } return false; } There is a little trick of using GetComponentsInChildren function that allows to get components without allocations in the necessary buffer, unlike another one that returns new array of components Secondly, I still had to do something about O(N^2). I've tried a number of space splitting techniques before I stopped at a simple two-dimensional grid in the display space where I project my isometric objects. Every such sector contains a list of isometric objects that are crossing it. So, the idea is simple: if projections of the objects are not crossed, then there's no point in building dependencies between the objects at all. Then we pass over all visible objects and build dependencies only in the sectors where it's necessary, thereby lowering time complexity of the algorithm and increasing performance. We calculate the size of each sector as an average between the sizes of all objects. I found the result more than satisfying. General performance Of course, I could write a separate article on this... Okay, let's try to make this short. First, we're cashing the components (we use GetComponent to find them, which is not fast). I recommend everyone to be watch yourselves when working with anything that has to do with Update. You always have to bear in mind that it happens for every frame, so you've got to be really careful Also, remember about all interesting features like custom == operator. There are a lot to things to keep in mind, but in the end you get to know about every one of them in the built-in profiler. It makes it much easier to memorize and use them Also you get to really understand the pain of garbage collector. Need higher performance? Then forget about anything that can allocate memory, which in C# (especially in old Mono compiler) can be done by anything, ranging from foreach(!) to emerging lambdas, let alone LINQ which is now prohibited for you even in the simplest cases. In the end instead of C# with its syntactic sugar you get a semblance of C with ridiculous capacities. Here I'm gonna give some links on the topic you might find helpful: Part1, Part2, Part3. Results I've never known anybody using this optimization technique before, so I was particularly glad to see the results. And if in the first versions it took literally 50 moving objects for the game to turn it into a slideshow, now it works pretty well even when there're 800 objects in a frame: everything's spinning at top speed and re-sorting for just for 3-6 ms which is very good for this number of objects in isometry. Moreover, after initialization it almost haven't allocate memory for a frame Further opportunities After I read feedbacks and suggestions, there were a few features which I added in the past versions. 2D/3D Mixture Mixing 2D and 3D in isometric games is an interesting opportunity allowing to minimize drawing of different movement and rotations options (for instance, 3D models of animated characters). It's not really hard thing to do, but requires integration within the sorting system. All you need is to get a Bounding Box of the model with all its children, and then to move the model along the display Z by the box's width. Bounds IsoObject3DBounds(IsoObject iso_object) { var bounds = new Bounds(); iso_object.GetComponentsInChildren<Renderer>(_tmpRenderers); if ( _tmpRenderers.Count > 0 ) { bounds = _tmpRenderers[0].bounds; for ( var i = 1; i < _tmpRenderers.Count; ++i ) { bounds.Encapsulate(_tmpRenderers[i].bounds); } } return bounds; } that's an example of how you can get **Bounding Box** of the model with all its children and that's what it looks like when it's done Custom isometric settings That is relatively simple. I was asked to make it possible to set the isometric angle, aspect ratio, tile height. After suffering some pain involved in maths, you get something like this: Physics And here it gets more interesting. Since isometry simulates 3D world, physics is supposed to be three-dimensional, too, with height and everything. I came up with this fascinating trick. I replicate all the components of physics, such as Rigidbody, Collider and so on, for isometric world. According to these descriptions and setups I make the copy of invisible physical three-dimensional world using the engine itself and built-in PhysX. After that I take the simulation data calculated and get those bacl in duplicating components for isometric world. Then I do the same to simulate bumping and trigger events. The toolset physical demo GIF Epilogue and conclusions After I implemented all the suggestions from the forum, I decided to raise the price up to 40 dollars, so it wouldn't look like just another cheap plugin with five lines of code I will be very much delighted to answer questions and listen to your advices. I welcome all kinds of criticism, thank you! Unity Asset Store page link: Isometric 2.5D Toolset
  4. Brain

    Postal 1 Open Source

    The complete buildable source tree of Postal 1, open sourced by Running With Scissors in 2016.
  5. Hi, Our hack & slash game, Book of Demons is exiting early access in less than an hour (8am PST) and we're doing an AMA live on reddit Feel free to join and ask us any questions
  6. applicant42

    Update 0.19.0

    Still just a start, WIP, but finally a new step done. New assets, new sandbox map… Isometric and alpha maths has been rewritten but still needs a lot of refactors and reviews. http://game.applicant42.com/
  7. applicant42

    Frameworks, tooling and other drugs

    It's been long since some colleagues and me "achieve" our unfinished Red Atlas I project. A full hackaton weekend trying to do a strategic game and the full weekend deep inside PhaserJS, our bet on free game frameworks and engines. Phaser 2 CE & Webpack 3 I liked Phaser framework and I wanted to come back to this framework, so now here I am again, working with an idea of #isometric #RPG. Well, not now, Phaser released its 3.x version and webpack is in its 4.x version. I started this idea some time before, using Phaser 2 CE and Webpack 3.x and it looks like is not easy to migrate to Phaser 3 now for me. The future will say... As I re-started this idea many times searching for a good architectural approach to work with this toolchain I decided recently to upload and share the boilerplates I used to start. I hope it helps someone! Boilerplate for 2D games Boilerplate for Isometric games
  8. Hey there! I'm new to being a game dev. My main skill sets are in art, writing, and design (gonna drop a link to the portfolio I use to sell at conventions): http://brakinja.blogspot.com/2018/02/piece-examples.html So, my game was picked up by my university club 6 months ago, and me and a VERY small team have been trying to a demo happen. The problem? It's 1) a club project, so it's not at the top of people's to-do lists, and 2) I'm not a programmer, so even if I WANTED to get stuff done with it (and I do want to get stuff done), I can't. I'm needing to rely on other people to make my game for me, and I think I'm starting to get a little over it (not knocking their effort, mind you). The main problem, is, again: I'm not a programmer. At all. I have no experience, and though I'm making progress in learning, I'm pretty far away form the skill of others that I work with. I'm a man on a mission to get skilled enough to work on his own darn game. The game will involve visual novel-esque dialogue, choice branches, a cutscene system reminicent of games like Gravity Rush and The World Ends with You, and of course, a tactical RPG combat system much like Final Fantasy Tactics and Fire Emblem. I've always been bad at Unity (not a programmer), and while Game Maker has been giving me better luck (I can actually make something move in Game Maker), I'm worried it can't do what I need it to do. God don't get me started on making an isometric map. So here we are. How should I approach learning how to do this so I can help my future team (I know this won't be a solo project), what tools are out there I should consider, and what engine can help me make this game happen?
  9. PIPEIO - a simple time killer, in the spirit of Ketchapp. PIPEIO - game in which the main thing is collecting and holding the combo, to achieve better results. The more points you have, the higher you will be on the cross-board leaderboard. GamePlay Video ◉ Rules of survival: 1. Fall down and catch the combo 2. Earn as many points as possible 3. Every 5 floors is a level. 4. Do not fall on the tile of your color 5. More colors = more points. 6. Get as many points as possible! ◉ Top - every week. Jump in an endless journey with the ball at various levels from the lungs to the supercomplex. Get to the Dark Essence. Try to maneuver in a spiral, try the edges, earn the greatest combo. Be brighter with the Tricolor game. Open for yourself a new one and collect more points. Enter the TOP list and become the Master of the Pipeio! Show whose balls are steeper! Download: GooglePlay | AppStore
  10. Hi guys, I'm excited to announce the release of my very first indie game Lost Forest TD. This project is a "one man show" and so far I've been personally responsible for each and every phase of the development process. I'm constantly updating and improving it, so your comments, constructive criticism and contributions are invaluable to me. Lost Forest TD is a 100% offline Tower Defense game, which supports leader-boards, where each player gets to upload score and compete with others. Free to play.This new spin on the classic tower defense genre throws the player into the role of a Forest Keeper charged with creating a deadly path and defeating waves of enemies efficiently and creatively enough to protect the children, seeking shelter in the castle. The combination of unique enemies with various skills, insane weapons of destruction and unbelievable variety of defense towers with multiple upgrade levels guarantee addictive gameplay and challenge players to keep their towers intact and stop any foe from crossing the game field. Smart strategy to dominate the opponents and sufficient forest power points will let the player progress through the levels. AppStore link Google Play link Game Trailer Gameplay Let's Play Thanks for checking my post!
  11. Good afternoon, My team and I, Redd Project, have been working on an Isometric Turn Based RPG based on a crypto currency. The story is set in a post utopian world where human powers have become a norm for a small minority, destroying the newly found balance. We're recruiting 2 artists part-time or 1 full-time on a contractual Rev-Share basis, which takes into account contribution and other similar rating systems. It's a risky project, but you might be about to embark on the most refreshing game project of your life. We're trying to create a small footprint in the fresh crypto gaming market, absorbing an entire gaming community in a world where playing is actually synonym with real world value creation. As such, you'll find hereunder some art styles that we're aiming for. If you're interested, contact me at MyReddProject@gmail.com or through Discord (at Redd#3121).
  12. Has anyone tried finding isometric bounds programatically? What I'm trying to achieve is to use the Cartesian width and height of the object to find it's isometric bounds, but I think that just doesn't work once the image gets complicated. The attachments should explain clearly what I'm trying to achieve (note: the bounds drawing isn't perfect).
  13. I have created a small game (34 mb) and need help seeing if it actually works over the internet. The IP that you will be connecting to is hardcoded in the game, so all you have to do is connect to my server when I have started it. The game has some funny people running around and a chat system. E-mail me here or message me if interested and Ill send you the build: istyagipgms@gmail.com Thanks!
  14. Before reading my question, please see the following image, which is a pixel art representation of the battle against Ornstein & Smough, from Dark Souls: (This incredible work was made by the deviantartist Cyangmou) This is just one example out of thousands of incredibly detailed works made in pixel art. My question is, can a game be made with this level of detail? The closest I can think of is Death's Gambit, which is still an upcoming title. Still, it is not even close to the level of details you can find in some pixel art illustrations. I am really curious to know if something like this would be viable. Of course, it is a lot of work, but pixel art games have framework to spare (as far as I can tell from experience developing and playing), it just would take very long to do it.
  15. OareasO

    Project introduction

    Hello I'm Ioannis Mironenko a pixelartist and old school rpg fan, this year i started a rpg project inspired by old school rpgs and adventure games like Bitmap Brothers Cadaver, Quest for Glory, Darkmere,Ultima and sega genesis Shadowrun. i made the art myself you can check more of my works in my Deviantart: http://oareaso.deviantart.com/ The gameplay will be similar to a point and click adventure like Quest for Glory, for this i am learning and using the Adventure Game studio engine link: https://www.adventuregamestudio.co.uk/ I am not very good at coding and still learning, so a proper demo may not come any time soon, but i am working hard to recreate the nice old frame by frame animation and isometric graphics old games like cadaver and darkmere had. This wont be a big game, but i still want to make it as charming as possible, i am very curious of hearing feedback and opinions. Thank you.
  16. I decided to implement an isometric 2D game for iPhone, using SpriteKit and GameplayKit, and Inkscape/GIMP as graphic tools. I prefer vectorial graphics because as a iOS programmer I am required to create multiple versions of my assets, each one of different size in order to adapt to different screen resolutions. I use GIMP just rarely, in the case that I need to adjust the images created with Inkscape. I draw my hero using Inkscape, and this is the result: Now since it's an isometric game, the hero needs to move in all the four directions, and he also needs to aim the shotgun to different directions. I will also need to draw the hero with more weapons, but for now I have this one. Now the question is: should I draw a new version of the hero for all the possible directions in which the shotgun could be pointed, or there is a smarter way? The only options that come to my mind are: Drawing the hero aiming the shotgun only in the main directions (maybe 0°, 15°, 30°, etc...) Drawing the hero aiming in 3 directions (0°, 45°, -45°) and then finding a way to interpolate the images in order to draw the hero aiming in the intermediate directions Using two separate layers, the top layer to draw the arms and the shotgun of the hero, and rotating it in the desired direction Clearly the best way would be to redraw the hero for each aiming direction, but it requires too much work. If instead I choose the 3rd option I think I'd get not so much realistic results. What do you suggest? or maybe there is a smarter way?
  17. I have created a small game (34 mb) and need help seeing if it actually works over the internet. The IP that you will be connecting to is hardcoded in the game, so all you have to do is connect to my server when I have started it. The game has some funny people running around and a chat system. E-mail me here if interested and Ill send you the build: istyagipgms@gmail.com Thanks!
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