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Found 43 results

  1. Hey guys, does anyone have any recommendations please for companies offering Community Management/Marketing services? I'm quite price conscious, so if you know which ones are cheaper/expensive/how much they charge, for a small/medium sized developer? Thanks
  2. Hello, I am seeking some advice on the following procedural events: I do 3d modeling and music/sfx. In the first game project I contributed to, the concept artist wanted to leave because -- according to him -- there were irreconcilable differences with the project manager on a few matters. To me, aside from his attitude/reactionary problem he had with everyone including myself, it was obvious he was grasping for reasons to leave because he disliked not being in charge. So he left the project and started his own, and surprisingly, he asked if I'd tag along. I said sure, since I had nothing to lose. In this new project, for the past 6 mths of it's lifespan, there has been little to no cooperation between the Artists and Modelers, plus numerous management issues by the concept artist-now-project manager. The project manager hasn't produced any concept art to help support his own project, despite his decent drawing skills. He also favors the work of this other 3D modeler whom has a nice portfolio, yet hasn't contributed a single item for the project since joining from the start. Meanwhile, I'm uploading numerous concepts, designs and music themes, and no feedback from the mgr except things like "I know you've been uploading a lot of stuff, but could you ___?". One other dev and I have been trying to do what we can to help the project manager successfully publish his game, despite our busy schedules. And aside from the fact that the project manager dislikes me for some bizarre reason, I put personal issues aside and volunteered to help him out of selfless reasons rather than monetary. While some folks in the project expect compensation sooner or later, I certainly don’t, nor do I need it; I see my contributions as a hobby which I am putting to use whenever I have time off work. I sometimes feel that even if I 3d modeled an exact replica of the cysteine chapel, or if I composed a musical masterpiece, it wouldn’t be as good to the project manager as a literal potato made by the other 3d modeler. Also, this other 3d modeler has complimented my work, then has actually deleted the comment moments later. The project manager noticed everything but had no reaction. The whole situation seems strange to me and I feel I caused most of it. At the moment I feel that my works are not really welcome in the project, and that I’m sort of wasting my time. I'm not looking for credit of my work, but I'm human and I have limits to being disregarded so much. TL;DR: I enjoy 3d modeling & composing as a hobby, but does the project manager need to obtain assets and music from someone else, someone whose work he's interested in? Or is the project just a lost cause because of no cooperation in general? Thanks in advance. EDIT: I haven't abandoned the former project and am still actively contributing to it.
  3. https://www.kongregate.com/games/cardalomim/evo-psy-test You’ve inherited your father’s old plot of land in The Forest. Armed with hand-me-down tools and a some food, you set out to begin your new life. Can you learn to live off the land and turn these overgrown fields into a thriving and safe home? Give me any feedback that you may have. Thanks. Charles.
  4. Free tickets are available to The Business of Indie Games Virtual Summit happening next month from July 24-27, 2018. There will be 30+ well respected indie devs, producers, and industry veterans speaking about strategy, finance, and marketing of indie games. You can easily sign up on the website at https://businessofindiegames.com/info.
  5. Free tickets are available to The Business of Indie Games Virtual Summit happening next month from July 24-27, 2018. There will be 30+ well respected indie devs, producers, and industry veterans speaking about strategy, finance, and marketing of indie games. You can easily sign up on the website at https://businessofindiegames.com/info. View full story
  6. Hey guys, I've now spent a good amount of time to finish my first Game. The software is as good as ready for a Release, however I'm not! I've come up with so many questions regarding the release of my first Game and i don't know who to ask them. My Questions/Problems are: 1.Copyright Do i have to claim Copyright on my game, and if so, how do i do that? 2.Company Do i have to create a Company to release the game (regarding the copyright and the taxation of the Patreon income [I'm living in Germany]) 3.Release Platform I'm yet not sure how i want to release my Game. As my budget is as of now limited to 0$ a free release-platform is the only way to go. I thought about Itch.io or launching an download-website just for this Game. I hope that you guys have some advices for me regarding these Questions. Please keep in mind that I am a 100% Rookie on this field and excuse me for all the times i sound like a complete idiot. I'm thankfull for any Answers! Cheers, Wooks
  7. Hey All! We are a team of 7 looking for more members for our story based action adventure game! we are looking for: People who can do cutscenes and animation (Gameplay Animation and cutscenes) Unreal Engine 4.19 Programmers (MUST KNOW C++) Concept artists/Environment artists VFX Artists Logo/Ui Designers 3D Character Modellers (Who Can Also Rig) Orchestra Composer If interested please email liondude12@gmail.com looking forward to hearing from you.
  8. Crowdsourcer.io is a growing concept, it allows projects/small businesses to bring in collaborators on a revenue share basis to help them grow and expand. Felicity Toad is one of many projects that is successfully developing their game through this platform and we want to share some insights with you. Felicity Toad has started as a labour of love and grown into a team of co-operative people who are willing to work on the final vision of this original game. Its foundations lay with one Neil Badman, who being 43, has decided to go with a dream. He had spent many years in menial jobs, the most recent being in care, but working in the health sector gave him purpose and meaning, which would profoundly alter the way in which he saw his life. Unfortunately, after a time he fell into disarray, which ended with a breakdown, but without this event Neil would never have been diagnosed with schizophrenia, a much stigmatized illness, in part thanks to Hollywood and other uneducated outlets, he says. Unperturbed and with a new and hopefully temporary found freedom, he wondered what to do with his time out of work. He began a band, but couldn’t quite find the sound he wanted despite many auditions and help from friends, so he put this project aside for the time being and pondered what was next. A gamer turned developer Before his breakdown he had found himself playing various computer games in his spare time, something he had always loved, and stumbled across a game called Oolite, a cooperatively built game reverse engineered from an old classic called Elite, a 3D space game that ran on 32k and even less for the Vic-20, a remarkable technical achievement. Oolite was a modern take on this classic, and being cooperatively built allowed you to construct your own content that would go up on the game’s site, for other people to download. Being a lifelong drawer and creative he took to looking at what other people weren’t particularly working on, settling with the look of the stars and the nebula’s generated from various images within the file system. He spent a year perfecting the use of the nebula generator, which was extremely popular with the player base. After creating a few different assets for this game he moved on and discovered a game called Battle For Wesnoth, a tongue in cheek strategy game that was simple, but very fun. It too was a labour of love by a very involved community and was not only moddable but had its own programming language. It was around here he was diagnosed with schizophrenia and suddenly found himself with a lot of free time, a very frightening time but free nonetheless. Neil needed to find something to occupy himself with, a distraction therapy from the nightmarish voices that were plaguing him, this was when he started to explore and start the band. He found himself returning to Battle For Wesnoth, as it was a perfect platform to learn something new, whilst creating a story and the characters in it, the start of a therapeutic addiction that instantly rang true for him. This was nearly but not quite all his loves combined, he discovered the joy of creating through programming, despite his extremely messy first attempts. The code was however functional, and a story emerged. Neil wondered what it would be to have total creative freedom other than modding someone else’s build, so he researched and soon found Unity3D, a platform for developing games from scratch that is free up until you make a certain amount of money, if any. The start of something new Now he needed an idea, he went through the motions of beginning to create the basics of a game, but soon found the technology wasn’t quite there yet to do what he wanted, so it was back to the drawing board. This was the birth of Felicity Toad, a tongue in cheek adventure, but dark and gritty in places. This would be a labour of love, a therapy, and a possible path back into work. It seemed perfect. The Beginnings of Felicity Toad Soon the idea was growing, and Neil realized if he was going to build the game it would take years of learning all the different aspects, and as much as he had the drive to get on with it, technology is changing at a rate, and in the supposed time he took to build the game it would be out of date by the time he finished, surrounded by up and coming virtual reality and holographic technology, would a 2D platformer survive in this environment? He needed a team, he didn’t have money and finding people who would fall in love with his game and join up seemed extremely unlikely. After posting on numerous sites, sometimes in the wrong places, he garnered a small amount of interest, but it was through exploring the different sites he could try that he stumbled upon a suggestion posted by someone for someone else. A site called Crowdsourcer.io was up and coming, promising to set people such as himself on the right path with the right help. There was nothing to lose. Progress Made on Felicity Toad After Signing Up On Crowdsourcer.io Crowdsourcer.io has helped the project to get its creative foothold in a world already swimming in games, so what would be different about it? Well, firstly he decided he needed to be doing something doable as a first game, so he settled on a 2D platformer, but there are many 2D indie games out there and being developed, even AAA companies still produce 2D platformers of extremely and unobtainable quality to compete with. There was still hope, a large sector of society has a love of independently made games, simply because they can take risks big AAA companies can’t afford to, and the 2D style is very reminiscent yet appealing to all age ranges. So what could be different? What needs to be familiar? This was a balance that needed to be assessed, and the Felicity Toad team have gone a way to addressing this interesting situation. Neil is still working on the game and making strides to finishing it every day. You can learn more about Neil’s project, Felicity Toad by following the link or finding his project on www.crowdsourcer.io. If you would like to contribute to Neil’s project you can find it here and can apply to contribute! View the full article
  9. Nice to meet you! First of all, it is a pleasure to be around and thank you for the available help! Basically, I am working on a new project and I would like to share some concept arts on my Twitter. The point is I am quite confused as to what I need to do to protect the general game idea, assets, and my company logo from being stolen/used unproperly by other people. I will definitely make great use of such information!
  10. Okay, I want to find someone or a group whos in the process of making a browser game or mobile game or is interested in doing so. Im interested in guiding and help choose the route the general direction of the game should lean twards. Of course it is your game and you do have the rights to refuse the suggestions i have to improve the game, I have marketing concepts and ideas in mind and i do take time studying other strategies as well as come up with my own strategies for success. Look at it this way, you have a game you are trying to perfect, yet dont know how to raise a fanbase or increase player count, dont know how to generate revenue substantually. I have solutions to try, and as you may see it, I am your npc offering you the optional side quest to improve your game... Like normal side quests, they are optional but can be rewarding. I dont need money or asking for it either, because my service is free, but if it does lead to success then a generous donation or hiring me as a permenent team member in the future might work for the best for me.
  11. slayemin

    Contract Work

    I need to make money to fund the further development of my game. So, I've been doing paid contract work in VR. Most of the work is pretty easy for me and consists of producing VR applications which run 360 videos with some interactive GUI elements embedded into it. I also have been helping other game developers produce their games. Initially, I charged $50/hour for my early VR programming work. I believed that I needed to figure out the development process and it would take a bit longer because it was new to me, so I felt bad charging a higher rate. I got it figured out now, so I raised my rates to $75/hour. I... think I made a mistake. The way I came up with $75/hour is pretty straight forward. I took my previous annual salary and divided it by the number of hours in a full working year, and that gave me a rough ballpark on my hourly rate. The flaw in this approach is that I was assuming that the amount of work I have would be constant, that I would be working a full 40 hours a week with billable hours. The reality is that I have huge gaps between projects, so that means I have huge gaps between billable hours. So, the general intuition would be to increase my hourly rate, right? I think that's also a mistake. The problem is that I've gotten too fast. It used to take me something like 10 hours to produce a 360 VR video app. That's because I built it from scratch. Now, I have a code base and template I reuse. It takes me about 2 hours to produce a simple video app. With an hourly fee structure, it's more profitable for me to work slow so I can charge higher bills. But I can't do that, I'm an honest man and my integrity is priceless to me. I'm also a lazy engineer which causes me to strive for efficiency so I don't have to do tedious, wasteful work. Spending 10 hours on a 2 hour project would feel like a waste of time and an antithesis to common sense. So, I'm tentatively thinking that the correct fee structure is to charge a per project cost. If I quote someone for $5000 to complete a project, that's what I'll charge regardless of how long it takes. If I can finish the project in 5 hours, congrats, I just made $1000/hour. If it takes me 50 hours, then I made $100/hour. Now, I'm properly incentivized to work fast and efficiently. The faster I work, the more rewarding it is. This comes with some risks as well. What if I estimate that a project will take 15 hours, bid accordingly, but it really takes me 30 hours to complete? I'm making another mistake here... I'm not taking profit into account. If I step outside of myself for a moment and pretend that I'm an employee to myself, and employees are paid an hourly rate (let's say $75/hour) and I'm bidding on the cost of a project based off of just my raw production costs, then I make $0 in profit. All of the income goes directly into paying for the employee salaries, leaving nothing for the company, meaning growth is impossible and I lose money over time due to overhead costs. Instead, I should be taking the employee salary ($75/hour) and multiplying it by a factor of at least 2.5x. If I replace myself with a hired employee and keep the same fee structure in place, then the company is equally profitable because I am interchangeable with other workers. If I add more workers to the team, then of course my bid estimates will change. So, the total bid = sum of all wages * 2.5x; For clients, this could be a pretty good system as well. Instead of having runaway costs inflate a project budget, there is a fixed cost of production. My biggest challenge will be to accurately estimate the scope of work and bid accordingly. If I underestimate the scope, then I eat the cost difference. If I overestimate the scope, more profit, more reward! But then, I also come full circle to the original problem I had: If I originally took 10 hours to finish a project and bid accordingly based off of that time estimate, but through experience, innovation and increases in efficiency I now reduce that same work to 2 hours and bid accordingly, I would still be losing the hourly difference. So, do I bid as if I'm starting everything from scratch because my competitors would be in the same position? Or do I look at the requirements of a project and use that as an input parameter into a piece-wise defined function to assess estimated cost? Or, do I just pick high numbers in a random ballpark and hope to get lucky? Obviously, if requirements change, then the cost should change proportionately as well. If I charged a flat $10,000 for a project given its requirements / feature spec, and then a few weeks later the client decides to add/subtract a requirement, how would I figure out how to proportionately adjust the pricing to reflect the change in scope? I... don't... know... One other thing I'm finding annoyance at is that some clients aren't good clients to take on. Indies and startups are bad because they often don't have money, no matter their good intentions and promises. If it's going to break the bank for them to have me work for them, it's likely they'll be unable to pay me or that it will take 6+ months for me to get paid. I owe people money, I can't keep them waiting because I'm waiting to get paid. If they're sweating over my up front fee of $150, I shouldn't take them on as clients. My policy should be, "If I think they can't afford me, they can't afford me.". It may be better to risk leaving money on the table than taking on bad clients. Maybe I should increase my fee to weed them out? Another factor I hadn't considered are the non-billable hours I put into project efforts: Responding to emails and answering phone calls. On some projects, I've put more hours into phone calls, conversations and emails than actual, billable hours. Now, I want to be a nice person and to be easily accessible to my clients, but every hour I spend on email or phone calls is an hour I'm not spending making money. Every hour I'm not making money is also an hour I'm not working on Spellbound. I'm tempted to charge for my time here, but I don't want to start a stopwatch every time my phone rings or I get an email requiring a response. Maybe I should just pad my estimated hours to account for time spent communicating? Or maybe I should measure the average amount of time I spend doing administrative stuff on behalf of a project, and adjust my multiplier accordingly? Instead of a 2.5x hourly rate, maybe 3.5x? The last few factors I also hadn't been considering is that I'm a freelancer, with talent and experience, ready to hit the ground running, today. I'm not an employee, so I don't get "company benefits". No medical. No dental. No vision. No retirement fund matching. No overhead costs (HR, managers, office space, parking, cafeterias, admin staff, etc). When the project is complete, I am done and go away -- an employee would still incur costs afterwards. No employee liability. Don't like me or my work? Fire me, no mess, no HR hassle, no legal wrangling. That means I have to pay for all of that stuff out of my own pocket, so I need to charge more as a contractor. My girlfriend has taken ample opportunities to remind me that I'm not charging enough. She told me that based on my skill set, I would be equivalent to a "technical editor" in the Hollywood film industry, and they charge something like $175/hour. Based on my background and experience, and how niche my industry is, she believes I should be charging at least $300/hour. That... makes me a bit pale to consider as an hourly rate. I have a hard time believing I'm worth it. But hey, if I can complete a project in hours which would take other people 5-10x longer, if not more, than maybe I am worth it. I recently went and visited a motion capture studio near my office to figure out how I can use them and what their rates are. They charge $3750 for 4 hours, or $8000 for 8 hours. That's a lot of money for a poor indie like me, but... really, it's not a lot of money at all when you think about it. I should be charging roughly in that ball park, right? Deep down inside, I think I feel afraid to charge a lot of money for what I do. But I think I need to reframe the way I think about this. People aren't hiring *me*, they're hiring *my production company*, and for now, I just happen to be the sole employee. If I staff up in the future, I wouldn't feel bad charging high rates to cover my costs. But staffing up would also mean I have to dedicate a significant chunk of time towards staff training, and I'm capable of training staff, so... that means I'm pretty good, right? I guess I just see the work that I do as "easy" and "enjoyable" and I shouldn't be getting paid for this. But, the work is only easy for me because I've got 18 years of experience and the projects I take on are 10x easier than writing my own game engine from scratch, or building enterprise systems for the military. Truly, the biggest risk for me is that the work is such a cakewalk for me that I am bored by it. I was realizing this afternoon that I'm most incentivized to work on other peoples' projects when I'm getting paid really well for them. $75 per hour is not enough money to motivate me to overcome my boredom, but $150/hour is. My girlfriend also tells me that I'm terrible at business, that I don't really have the head for it. I half believe her because she's a lot more experienced than I am, and she's bringing in a lot more money than I am. I've been thinking carefully about what I'm currently doing, how it's not profitable, and what I need to do in order to make my work profitable and worth my time. With my current flow of contract work and my billing rates, I don't make enough money. Honestly, it's just barely enough to pay my cheap office rent. I'm practically treading water, getting nowhere even though I'm working hard. For the last few weeks, I've been thinking that I need to get more proactive about getting money. I need to get out of my chair, put on a nice dress suit, take my VR goggles, and go door to door at every company and show them what I can do for them and how it can help their business. I need to figure out my sales pitch, refine it, and go get myself some big work. I believe in VR, I think its the future, I am bullish on its prospects, and I can sell. I have proven to myself that I have the personality and capability to sell, I can build what I sell, so... I should just get up and go do it. I'm optimistic that I could do well, but I'm sort of holding myself back somehow. The dream is that I do well enough at bootstrapping that I can work myself out of every job and become more of a CEO/producer type, hiring people to replace me. Programmer? Hire that out. Sales guy? Hire that out. Film guy? Hire that out. Hire people for everything -- delegate -- don't get my hands dirty, don't get into the weeds. If I do, I'm still doing it wrong. While I'm fully capable of writing code and producing everything myself, I can't scale. I would be just one guy, taking on projects with a scope of what only one guy can complete. Big projects = big money. I also sort of think that I should split my time 50/50 between providing services to clients and creating my own software applications and releasing them online. The problem with exclusively doing work for clients is that it fixes my scalability to whatever workload my production company can handle. My throughput is fixed, and thus my income is limited by my throughput. It would be a trap which limits my growth potential. However, if I build and release my own apps at the same time, my growth potential is limited only by my marketing and sales capabilities. Once an app is completed, I can make an infinite number of copies in an instant and sell them. If I diversify and make several apps in several different market categories, a few of them are bound to succeed. I have been particularly infected by an idea which could potentially establish a new market category for content in the VR market (I'll share details after I execute). If I can produce it, market it, and sell it, and it thrives, then I could scale it out and go big. I'm planning on creating a working prototype this spring and releasing it to the market to see how it fares. Anyways, the point is that it would be easier to make $1m by scaling out a successful app than by scaling out client services, but a successful app could also be an additional service category offered to clients. However I do it, I will fund the production of Spellbound and I will have a well funded team working on it...eventually. Anyways, I did something cool the other day. I integrated Leap Motion with 360 videos, so you can use your own hands to pan the camera around. I'm also going to add in finger taps for pressing buttons, so people can feel sort of like Tom Cruise in Minority Report. The placeholder video was shot a month ago at a Dell factory in China as a part of their effort to be transparent about their production pipeline. Check it out:
  12. Revenue share models (often shortened to rev-share and synonymous with profit sharing models) are a way for businesses and startups to pay the members of their teams. In this article we’ll explore what exactly is a rev-share model and how one might be used with collaborative game development on a small budget. What is a revenue and profit sharing model? Imagine you have a business or a startup with no product. You decide that you and a team are going to build it together. Rather than make them your employees you decide to treat them as investors. The benefit of this is that you no longer have to take out a loan or find finance to pay employees, and better yet, you can get in as many team members as you need. Because they’re considered investors, however, their remuneration comes once the business starts making a profit and for their investment (for instance, of time) they get a proportional share of the profit, normally operating profit. This is essentially a rev-share or profit sharing agreement. There are many takes on such models, but the crux of it is that you treat the people who contribute to your product as investors and thus give them a representative share of the profits. Contributors receive a share of the profits proportionate to, and in return for their time investment How to create a collaborative game development environment With this in mind, you might be wondering how it’s possible to turn a rev-share model into a viable model for developing a game. Well, wonder no more! Here are some points to get you going. 1) Find the right platform for you The first thing to do is figure out how you’re going to organise the structure of what is essentially a business. This can become a little tricky if you’re going to rev-share. Many rev-share agreements are informal and tough to enforce, so you’re best going to a specific platform such as Crowdsourcer.io to formalise the profit sharing model. If you want to go down the route of splitting equity with contributors, legally, then perhaps look into registering a partnership agreement with your country’s company register. If you decide to do this make sure you’re doing thorough background checks on anyone who you haven’t met and interviewed in person. Want to form a rev-share team and build your game for free? Check out Crowdsourcer.io 2) Get contributors and game devs Next up is to get the right people into your project. Not everyone is going to be up for investing their time for a share of the profits, life can often be too busy for that. Therefore, it can take some time to find people who are both willing to invest their time and believe in your project, but being a part of the right communities can make a massive difference in speeding up this process. For starters, have a look at GameDev.net and TigSource.com, get involved with their communities and see if you can’t get a bite or two. If you want more info on what type of developers you’ll need, see this article. 3) Paying collaborators equitably with a profit share model At last, we come to the crux of it. As with all employees or investors, eventually, they’re required to be paid. If you’re doing an informal rev-share model or are working with people spread out all over the world this can not only be a nuisance but introduce some trust issues. That’s why it’s so important to find the right platform and method for formalising your rev-share agreement. Crowdsourcer.io, for instance, makes life easy by automatically routing sales proportionately to all contributors in a project without anyone having to chase people up or request bank account information. However, if you’ve not gone down this route, it may be necessary to request bank information from all the collaborators and distribute their share of the profit manually. Lastly, if you’ve not formalised the model, i.e. you’re not using a platform that does all the work for you, one of the most important things to do is make all earnings completely transparent to your contributors, so come payday they can tot up the numbers themselves, helping to avoid any disputes. A good way of doing this is to invite contributors into your merchant accounts with any retailers (e.g. Steam), and if possible invite them in as accountants – granting them access only to sales figures whilst preventing them from editing/removing the uploaded binary or store pages. And with that, I hope we’ve made the concepts of rev-share models more digestible and given you an idea of how you might practically implement them to develop a game. Until next time, folks! View the full article
  13. Hey Everyone, I was part of this community 10 years ago. I made a game that Steve Pavlina at Dexterity published and almost no one bought. I'm a programmer, I like to build stuff and HATE to market and sell stuff. If you want to take my product and make a pile of money with it, I'll split it with you 50/50. I owned picross dot com for several years before Nintendo took it from me. All I was left with was a few thousand user-made nonogram puzzles in my database. I've been trying to do something with them, but again, I'm not a business person. So I've made a mobile friendly html5 page with a version of picross and it's pretty much complete, if you can monetize it I'd love to have your help. But picross games on mobile suck right? Because there's too many little things to tap and too much zooming in and out! Not with my game. I automatically fill in every other cell in the puzzle, then highlight the unsolved cells one at a time and the user need only select "mark" or "blank". You still have to use picross-like logic, but it's faster and the UI is far simpler. So this thing already exists, you can play it here http://www.questengine.com/quickcross/ I think it only responds to touch events so it may not work on a full desktop browser with mouse clicks. There's a google adsense ad that pops up after each puzzle, but please ignore it, I'm not trying to get clicks, I seriously want a person who's good at building business relationships and who's just looking for a product to work around. Hope you'll have a look, thanks.
  14. Morning all. For the last many years my indie software developments have been using an online tool called FengOffice to do development management. It's a power collaboration tool that supports multiple concurrent developments, file sharing, discussion, milestones, tasks and most importantly (for me) hourly tracking. My webhosts have recently started throttling the PHP memory and apparantly Feng is a huge PHP hog. I can change webhosts obviously but when I looked at the CPU/memory usage of Feng it was pretty heavy. Does anyone have online collaboration tools/suites they use or would recommend? My requirements below: Must Have: - Task scheduling - Time tracking by task/user - Note sharing/discussion - User access controls for various areas of the project (IE server guys dont need to see modelling guys tasks and progress.) Nice to have: - File Sharing - Multiple project management - Milestones Thanks in advance! Mark
  15. Billy Joe Cain of Creative Catalyst discusses the problems you can have in a game studio, with the development team, and dealing with issues that can happen in a game studio based on his 20+ years of experience in the industry. PPT: Download
  16. Kate Edwards, Executive Director of the IGDA, discusses diversity and inclusion across the games industry. Slides: Download
  17. In a repeat of his earlier PDGC talk, Rupert Meghnot, CXO of Burnout Game Ventures, discusses project management best practices for game development. Includes supplemental documentation (see link below). Twitter: https://twitter.com/rupertmeghnot Additional documentation for presentation: 03 - Rupert Meghnot - Intro to Project Management for Game Development (Visuals) - 2016-07-25.pdf
  18. I am animator by hand, and i am doing game animation for at least 8 years so far. During the last 2 years, i came with a idea for game and maybe some day, i want to start indie game company. As i am thinking to start game company, i am also thinking what kind of value i can give to the company. For example, am experience in animation,sales(I was selling web development services, before i jumped to gaming), bit of rigging- just not for production, i am learning on the side as well. The rest of the gaming production, like modeling, concept art, texturing, i am total noob or to say better, i am no near interest to do modeling for example, don't have such a patience to do it. But before characters and things are made for animating, what the hell i am would do? Also, what is the ideal size of the founding team of a game company? Positions to be filled mostly are, Concept artist, Modeler/Texture artist, programmer, animator-rigger. And later would need more people to join, like more animators, programmers, sound, fx,etc. And lastly, do i need to have something,like a prototype, to show people and get them interest, or should i ask someone i know, for skill that i lack, for example, Modeling would be great, texturing and rigging, and to start all together from scratch?
  19. Rupert Meghnot of Burnout Game Ventures discusses the elements of good project management. Twitter: https://twitter.com/rupertmeghnot
  20. Terry Nagy of Apogee Software discusses lessons learned in operations, legal, business development.
  21. Rule 1: Don’t bite off more than you can chew. If you’re new to the industry and want to get your foot in the door with your own ambitious project, it might worth taking a step back and considering your scope. While the games industry is full of lots of wonderful projects and games successfully making their way to steam and many other platforms, it took skilled and experienced individuals to get them there, many of them can tell you about their portfolio projects or their failed team projects of the past, but almost every one of them will tell you how worthwhile the experience was and how it helped mould the skills they have today. Show you know where the project’s going. If you want to succeed and get awesome people to come help you with your project, you need to show them it’s worth the time and worth the effort, demonstrate you know your project in and out and let them know that their opinions are also valued. When you first put pen to paper, make sure you know what you are making, a good way to start is to pick a fundamental mechanic that you enjoyed in another game, or even something you have come up with yourself, use that mechanic as the basis for your game idea, and try to mould the game world around it. Try to gather as much information as you can to showcase your game. This is particularly helpful when you’re trying to get new members or contributors to your project, at the end of the day, the best functioning projects are when everyone is on the same page and understands the project to work towards the same goal. Put yourself in the shoes of your teammates. Remember that in a team project, they need to trust you, and you need to trust them, you need to demonstrate that you are willing to spend the time on the project as much as they are. To coincide with this it is also important to demonstrate an understanding of artistic integrity, everyone has their thoughts and opinions and it is only right to be willing to hear out your team members to help build that trust and teamwork! View the full article
  22. Renee Gittins, President of Stumbling Cat, discusses approaches to building and managing a development team. Twitter: https://twitter.com/RikuKat
  23. Rupert Meghnot, CXO of Burnout Game Ventures, discusses project management best practices for game development. Includes supplemental documentation (see link below). Twitter: https://twitter.com/rupertmeghnot Additional documentation for presentation: 03 - Rupert Meghnot - Intro to Project Management for Game Development (Visuals) - 2016-07-25.pdf
  24. I've attempted to build a game engine in the past and eventually realized that was a lot more work than I would ever have time to finish. Went to college and started working fulltime as a software developer which ate up all my time. I eventually had some money saved up and just decided I would quit my job and focus on building a game in Unity3D. I managed to make a significant amount of progress and almost have a playable game, however, I ran out of money and had to start working again... SInce then I haven't had time or the drive to start working on the game again and it's just sitting there in its partially complete state collecting dust. Has anyone been able to build a successful game while working a full-time job? If so, how did you do it?
  25. So, you’ve got an aspiration to build a game, but aren’t entirely sure where to start. Have no fear, we’ve got you sorted! 1) Plan & spec First things first, get a plan together. It doesn’t necessarily have to be technical, but planning mechanics, the engine, consoles and whatnot can provide a good platform to launch off of. If you haven’t already, coming up with a name for your game and thinking about how you want to present it can help garner interest when it comes to getting in team members and advertising your pre-development stages. One last thing that’s worth doing is prototyping. If you’ve got the skills required, it may be worth implementing some of the mechanics in a cheap and cheerful way to begin the iterative process of analysing and refactoring core mechanics. 2) Get team members together You’re going to need team members to help you out, and here’s a good starting point for deciding who and what you’ll need most. Programmers Programmers are pretty important to any game, and you’re going to need experienced ones to get down into the nitty-gritty of the codebase that forms your game. Programmers can often help with more than just coding though, by providing debugging support and QA testing. Artists From concept art that sets the feel and direction of the game, through to 3D assets that appear in the final release, artists are key to creating a quality game with an identity. Artists will work with almost all the members of the team to ensure the game’s visuals deliver. You may need more than one artist, splitting up 3D Artists who create the assets used in the game and traditional artists who create concept art or things like 2D backgrounds. It can sometimes help to use open source assets such as those found at OpenGameArt.org. Sounds Designers While you’re free to use open source and free sound assets such as from Freesound.org it’s still always important to get dedicated sound designers in to boost the quality of your production. Sound designers will be responsible for creating all the sound effects in your game, and for the music, you may find it necessary to hire a dedicated composer. Writers It’s a common mistake to leave the writing of scripts, lore and dialogue to team members who have a little free time, but this can doom a game if the quality isn’t there. Afterall, who wants to play a game if the story or dialogue is rubbish? Instead, it’s best to get an experienced individual who knows what they’re doing and won’t let grammatical mistakes slip through to the release version of your game. Want to form a team and build your game for free? Check out Crowdsourcer.io 3) Get to it There’s no time like the present. Once you’ve got your team members together, strike while the iron is hot and get going. Bring together your teammates and your project management tools of choice and get started. If you’re not entirely sure about the project management side of things, check out this article, from which is a short list of tools to get you going. Task management tools Trello Atlassian Jira Basecamp Communication tools Slack Mattermost (Self-hosted) Stride (formerly Hipchat) Hangouts I hope this has been a good quickstart guide to help you get going on your game. If this was useful or if you want to show off what you and your team have managed to achieve, then drop a comment or hit me up! View the full article
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