Jump to content
  • Advertisement

Search the Community

Showing results for tags 'Music'.

The search index is currently processing. Current results may not be complete.


More search options

  • Search By Tags

    Type tags separated by commas.
  • Search By Author

Content Type


Categories

  • Audio
    • Music and Sound FX
  • Business
    • Business and Law
    • Career Development
    • Production and Management
  • Game Design
    • Game Design and Theory
    • Writing for Games
    • UX for Games
  • Industry
    • Interviews
    • Event Coverage
  • Programming
    • Artificial Intelligence
    • General and Gameplay Programming
    • Graphics and GPU Programming
    • Engines and Middleware
    • Math and Physics
    • Networking and Multiplayer
  • Visual Arts
  • Archive

Categories

  • Audio
  • Visual Arts
  • Programming
  • Writing

Categories

  • Game Dev Loadout
  • Game Dev Unchained

Categories

  • Game Developers Conference
    • GDC 2017
    • GDC 2018
  • Power-Up Digital Games Conference
    • PDGC I: Words of Wisdom
    • PDGC II: The Devs Strike Back
    • PDGC III: Syntax Error

Forums

  • Audio
    • Music and Sound FX
  • Business
    • Games Career Development
    • Production and Management
    • Games Business and Law
  • Game Design
    • Game Design and Theory
    • Writing for Games
  • Programming
    • Artificial Intelligence
    • Engines and Middleware
    • General and Gameplay Programming
    • Graphics and GPU Programming
    • Math and Physics
    • Networking and Multiplayer
  • Visual Arts
    • 2D and 3D Art
    • Art Critique and Feedback
  • Community
    • GameDev Challenges
    • GDNet+ Member Forum
    • GDNet Lounge
    • GDNet Comments, Suggestions, and Ideas
    • Coding Horrors
    • Your Announcements
    • Hobby Project Classifieds
    • Indie Showcase
    • Article Writing
  • Affiliates
    • NeHe Productions
    • AngelCode
  • Topical
    • Virtual and Augmented Reality
    • News
  • Workshops
    • C# Workshop
    • CPP Workshop
    • Freehand Drawing Workshop
    • Hands-On Interactive Game Development
    • SICP Workshop
    • XNA 4.0 Workshop
  • Archive
    • Topical
    • Affiliates
    • Contests
    • Technical
  • GameDev Challenges's Topics
  • For Beginners's Forum
  • Unreal Engine Users's Unreal Engine Group Forum
  • Unity Developers's Forum
  • Unity Developers's Asset Share

Calendars

  • Community Calendar
  • Games Industry Events
  • Game Jams
  • GameDev Challenges's Schedule

Blogs

There are no results to display.

There are no results to display.

Product Groups

  • Advertisements
  • GameDev Gear

Find results in...

Find results that contain...


Date Created

  • Start

    End


Last Updated

  • Start

    End


Filter by number of...

Joined

  • Start

    End


Group


About Me


Website


Role


Twitter


Github


Twitch


Steam

Found 26 results

  1. Hi guys! I've been producing quite some time now, and lately I've been very interested in videogame soundtracks and decided to give it a go myself. It's a bit retro-ish and very uplifting. I think it would go well in a very action-packed game. https://soundcloud.com/iiikeda/crash Let me know what you think!
  2. Last month Survios (the studio behind Raw Data and Creed: Rise to Glory) released the naval combat VR game, Battlewake on PlayStation VR, SteamVR, Oculus Home and Viveport. Since the early summer announcement fans have been anticipating the title, and after reading a lot of the reviews Survios did not disappoint. Battlewake turns players into “super-powered pirate lords embarking on a larger-than-life nautical war for the ages”. Players control an upgradeable warship armed with a collection of thirteen different ship-based weapons inspired by real and imagined naval battles including flak cannons, ballistae, and axe throwers. Each of the four playable pirate lords also has their own ancient magic to drawn from to unleash special and ultimate attacks like tsunamis, maelstroms, and kraken. The game’s score by composer Jeremy Nathan Tisser is also worth mentioning, as it does a great job of heightening the player’s high seas experience. In the below exclusive interview, Nathan discusses his process for scoring the game. A lot of reviewers are saying the multiplayer version of Battlewake is where the game really shines. How does the score change when there are multiple players? I would say the biggest difference between multiplayer and story mode is interactivity. When you’re playing in story mode, you want the story to grow and evolve with the player. Whereas in a multiplayer setting, you’re basically just battling it out with a bunch of different people, so the music doesn’t need to shift or evolve quite as much. What was your inspiration for the Battlewake score? I pulled inspiration from a myriad of different musical stylings and culture. Primarily, however, I drew on my backgrounds in heavy metal as well as traditional orchestration. We wanted a big “larger than life” style orchestral score, like you’d get in a pirate film, but we wanted it to be exciting and unique. We decided that a heavy metal twist on an orchestral pirate score was the right vibe for the game. We also looked at different cultures from around the world, and how they interpret music, be it through instrumentation, through rhythm, etc. So we used a wide variety of ethnic percussion instruments, including the African talking drum, Japanese taikos, Djun Djun, congas, various shakers, and much more. We also hired an anthropologist, with whom I also study Kung Fu, to act as a cultural consultant. We wanted to add an element that portrays some of the Voodoo cultures of Haiti. As it turns out, there’s almost no written information on the Voodoo and Vodou cultures, because to have any information in the hands of those wishing to cause harm to others could in fact be catastrophic to not just the intended target, but to innocent bystanders as well. So we found a couple of war chants that would be used for the purpose of intimidation instead, and incorporated those in the form of chants over the orchestra. Take a listen to the track “Jade and Steel” on the soundtrack when it comes out later this month! Were there any obstacles you had to overcome, musically, while working on this game? The biggest challenge of this game came down to how early I was brought in. I began writing music for Battlewake in December of 2017, when all that was available to me was a basic demo of the gameplay mechanics, a well-developed backstory, and a series of concept art for the various environments. Nothing was set in stone yet, and the storyline of the game itself was unknown. I had some ideas in my head, but it really took me about 8 more months to nail it down. The game itself had also grown and evolved, and was constantly changing form throughout that time, and that kept changing how the music would function within the game. Is there a type of game you haven’t scored yet that you would like to? I would honestly love to score a Star Trek game or a Doctor Who game. Or perhaps even a World War 2 style game. Something where I can get a little more nostalgic, and maybe write something beautiful, yet still maintain some sort of edginess to it. Personally, I just love the idea of storytelling, and I try to make that come through in my music for games as well, as opposed to just writing basic loops or standard “epic” music. There are four Pirate Lords in the game. Which was your favorite one to score? With Battlewake, I actually ended up scoring the 4 different environment types rather than the characters. The reason for this goes back to how early I was brought in. The story wasn’t set in stone just yet, but they still needed music. If you have a chance to play it, you’ll see how integral the music is to the “fun” experience of it. That being said, I absolutely loved scoring the arctic environments and the volcanic environments. I’ve been dying to write a big ol’ heavy metal polyrhythm into one of my scores, and Battlewake allowed the opportunity for me! The arctic level was more of my opportunity to write something that sort of follows a “song form”, so it feels like a track that could really be performed in a major concert environment. But it’s also just super fun to listen to and blow things up to! Do you have a favorite sequence in Battlewake? Personally, I really love when you get to release the Kraken! How many times have you watched Pirates of the Caribbean and thought “man, I’d love to get to say ‘Release the Kraken!’ in a video game…”? Well, now you can! And it is SUPER satisfying. How much music did you create for this game? Are you going to be releasing the game’s score? I wrote around 45 minutes of music or so, but it’s all layered and stemmed and divided into loops, so it can be turned into a few hours worth of music. As for the soundtrack, Notefornote Music has is putting out the soundtrack very soon! It’ll be available on all digital platforms around early-mid October, and then a few weeks later it will be available on a limited-edition CD print! There also may or may not be one additional release, so keep an eye out on my twitter page for that (@jeremytisser). Are you a gamer yourself? If so, what are some of your favorite games to play? I’m actually not much of a gamer. Growing up, I wasn’t allowed to have a Playstation or any of those like my friends, so I grew up playing games like NHL 97, Tony Hawk Pro Skater, Sonic the Hedgehog, and more on Sega Genesis, Nintendo 64, and then Gamecube. Every time I’d go to a friend’s house to play Mortal Kombat on Playstation, I’d just get whooped because they were playing every day, and I couldn’t. So I never got excited about games. However, I was ALWAYS big into VR. I used to get so fascinated by those big VR machines you’d see in the arcades, or in Las Vegas. And I always loved seeing those 3D IMAX films at the museums. When I got to graduate school in 2011 at USC, I had the opportunity to work on some really cool and advanced VR projects, so that’s what really sparked my passion. All that to say… Mike Tyson Boxing, Crazy Taxi, and Tony Hawk Pro Skater rule!
  3. Here's my latest Studio Ghibli-esque track. If anyones interested, there's a short score in the youtube description!
  4. Joshua Connor

    Composer looking for work

    Bachelor in music graduate looking to work on some cool projects. I can write chiptune, orchestral, synth stuff, or more minimalist stuff. I recently released a chiptune EP, and have plenty of orchestral stuff I've written, both to picture and standalone. Most of my music can be seen in my soundcloud, and on my site you can see what I've written to picture before, you can also contact me through my website. https://joshuaconnormusic.com/page/
  5. 'Black Project - Mysterious Cinematic Samples' from Bluezone delivers a wide range of experimental ambiences, intriguing drones, dark stylized sound effects, disturbing impacts and unreal textures. This enigmatic sound effect library (1.23GB / 99 WAV files in 24 bit 96 kHz) was created from hardware synthesizers and field recordings, then processed to give you complex, hyper-detailed and ready-to-use cinematic / trailer sounds. A large variety of unexplained sounds to create your own sequences: Sounds include background ambiences, strange and quiet atmospheres, deep and tenebrous drones, tortured metal sounds, impulsive impacts and spooky textures. 'Black Project - Mysterious Cinematic Samples' is the perfect choice for modern music compositions, movie scores, trailers, video games, commercials, documentaries, advertising and background music. Reference : BC0262 Delivery : Download link Download size : 1119 MB Extracted size : 1123 MB Format : WAV Resolution : 24 Bit / 96 kHz Channel : Stereo License : Royalty free Total files : 118 Total samples : 99 WAV More info and download: Black Project - Mysterious Cinematic Samples
  6. 'Black Project - Mysterious Cinematic Samples' from Bluezone delivers a wide range of experimental ambiences, intriguing drones, dark stylized sound effects, disturbing impacts and unreal textures. This enigmatic sound effect library (1.23GB / 99 WAV files in 24 bit 96 kHz) was created from hardware synthesizers and field recordings, then processed to give you complex, hyper-detailed and ready-to-use cinematic / trailer sounds. A large variety of unexplained sounds to create your own sequences: Sounds include background ambiences, strange and quiet atmospheres, deep and tenebrous drones, tortured metal sounds, impulsive impacts and spooky textures. 'Black Project - Mysterious Cinematic Samples' is the perfect choice for modern music compositions, movie scores, trailers, video games, commercials, documentaries, advertising and background music. Reference : BC0262 Delivery : Download link Download size : 1119 MB Extracted size : 1123 MB Format : WAV Resolution : 24 Bit / 96 kHz Channel : Stereo License : Royalty free Total files : 118 Total samples : 99 WAV More info and download: Black Project - Mysterious Cinematic Samples View full story
  7. i suck at making music so i need help fyi im broke so you wont get payed if you would like to help heres my discord server:https://discord.gg/SzNcgVz
  8. my kinda newest project, i love rock and these are basically synthesized rock songs. every instrument was designed using the same synth in FL studio. thought u guys might like it, reminds me of classic video game music
  9. This one was heavily inspired by my own feelings, not just goofing around in DAW as I usually do... Basically I would like to hear your feedback on this, cheers
  10. Communication can be the hardest part of any collaborative creative process. Many times the most difficult part is understanding the other party. This is especially true in art, and it’s definitely true in audio. Every community and discipline has their own language, their own slang, and their preferred way of communicating. So today, I’ll be talking about some of the ways us audio folks like to communicate and some of the ways you can be awesome at talking about audio. Now before I begin, I do want to say that any audio person or composer worth a grain of salt has (hopefully) realized that part of their job is to act as an interpreter and translator for non-audio/music people. This is true even within the audio community - composers need to know sound-design and non-musical audio terms just like sound-designers need some basic music lingo. If your audio people aren’t trying to find different ways to communicate and understand what you want/need, they’re not doing part of their job! Alright, let’s talk about some things you can bring to the table that will make audio communication easy. References If you take only one thing away from this article, please make it this! References are incredibly helpful for any type of audio person. Again, so much of the difficulty we’re discussing is communication. You can take out a massive amount of potential miscommunication by being able to hit play or send a link and say “like this.” Phrases like “make it sound heavier” , “bigger” , “higher” , “darker” , “harder” , all make perfect sense to the person saying them, but there are a myriad of ways to make something sound “higher” or “darker”, etc. On top of that, it’s not only a matter of executing the idea, but understanding the idea of the intended sound itself. Don’t be the person that says “it should sound more blue” and think you’ve effectively communicated. It may make perfect sense to you - but trust me, your audio people have no idea what that means. This is especially true when talking through emotional content and experience for music (there are LOTS of different types of “sad” music!). Have some references - know what you like about them - and say “like this.” Vocabulary Even with references, having some basic terms in your pocket that audio people know will help you immensely. In the game audio courses I teach at DePaul University, we spend a considerable amount of time getting students to talk about audio in a way they haven’t before. There are lots of words used to describe audio and music, but below are some of the most common and universally accepted. Use these, and your audio discussions will be much more efficient and productive. Pitch - the psychological perception of frequency. AKA, playing different notes on a piano. Don’t just say make it “higher.” Say “higher pitched” or “raise the pitch.” Your audio folks will know exactly what you mean. Loudness - how loud we perceive a sound to be. Using words like louder and quieter do a pretty good job of communicating this, but it happens all the time that non-audio people will try to talk about loudness and use terms like “lower” , “higher” or “softer.” These words can have lots of different meanings in the world of audio. So, anytime you want to talk about how loud or quiet something is and want to be super purposeful, throw the term loudness in there. Timbre (pronounced tamber) - the tone quality or “color” of a sound. If you play middle C on a piano just as loud as playing middle C on a viola, the difference between these sounds is their timbre. Similar to loudness, people use “higher” , “lower” , “softer” to describe timbre as well. This is fine, but you can see how easily these words can be misinterpreted. Want to be extra sure you’re communicating what you want? Use timbre into your sentence. There are many other terms us audio folks use to be very specific when talking about audio, but if you begin to use the three I’ve listed above, you will save yourself (and your audio people) so much time and headache! Your Game! No, you don’t need to wait until the game is almost done to bring in an audio person. Quite the opposite, actually! But you do need something to help you communicate your game and the world you’re creating to your audio people, even if the game is in its early stages. (Quick side note, you should totally bring in your audio collaborators as early as possible. You will be so much happier with your end audio experience. If you do this already, YOU ROCK!) For more emotional types of audio such as voice acting and music, having character, concept or environment art can be a fantastic resource if actual gameplay isn’t available. Also, if you have a significant backstory or lore you’ve created, this can be great for helping decide how this character should sound and/or how the world should “feel.” But even with these, audio folks need to know a basic outline of what the gameplay is going to be like and any sort of progression to it. There are many ways we can tailor audio to closely “fit” the game and gameplay experience, but we need to know these considerations as early as possible. Consider a stealth-action game: knowing that there is a stealth mechanic with different stages of intensity can open up a world of possibilities for composing and implementing an interactive score. For less-emotional audio, the best thing is to have video of animations or events. When I worked at a large corporate developer in the past, sometimes I would literally walk over to an animator or programmer’s desk and take video with my phone to begin the sound design. Because of the processes in place, they couldn’t send the animation to me as “final,” but I could begin the experimentation process. Plus, 90% of the time, it was the final version anyway. Realistic Expectations Audio and music are both a process - and that’s ok! It rarely happens that the first version of a sound or piece of music is ready to go into the final game. Exploration, experimentation and sometimes failure are just part of the gig. Knowing that you are always getting closer to your goal is important - especially when you’re excited to hear what your audio people have been cooking up, but it doesn’t quite hit the mark. That being said, if version 15 basically sounds the same as the previous 14 versions, that’s just a terrible audio person or serious lack of effective communication. Each version needs to be trying another interpretation of your notes or adding to what they had before. Creating multiple versions and using the differences between them can also be very helpful to communicate. But in order to do that, we first need to create those couple different versions. Overall, if you take the time to think about and purposefully communicate with your audio person instead of improvising descriptions and goals on the spot, you should be in great shape. Pair that with good references, some basic audio vocabulary and game materials (art, animations, gameplay) and your audio folks should be able to dive right in. Be sure to check out Unlock Audio! Want to reach out? hello@unlockaudio.com
  11. In the first episode of Madsen's Musings, I discuss the issue of being too self critical about your work and how that can get in the way of your progress. Wanna learn more about me or my work? Go here:http://www.madsenstudios.com/ Subscribe to my YouTube channel or follow me here on GameDev.net to see all the latest updates. A transcript is provided below the video. Transcript So I'm walking my dog Kobe, she's right here, and I had this idea -- this thought -- that I noticed myself, and so many artists seem to deal with feeling like they're inferior, or they're somehow a fraud and people are going to find out that they've been faking it this whole time. This is something that plagues so many people, from the highest tiers to the newest beginner in our industry, and just some ideas -- some thought -- that came to mind for me with the right ratio; with the right balance it can be an ok thing to have hypercritical thoughts about your playing, but it can quickly turn to a negative thing if it's out of balance. If you are too negative; if you are too hypercritical about your playing; if you don't appreciate what you're doing well. You want to have a list of things that you can work on. You want to have a list to say "these are objectives that I haven't met yet". But you also want to relish and enjoy; appreciate and recognise the things that you do well. I'll give you an example: Oh yeah, quick story. In 2014, I was fulltime freelancing and I had a brief lull in work, so I joined Fiverr -- that's with two Rs: F I V E R R. I joined that service to offer remote saxophone recordings. (Mosquito on my face.) I didn't know how well it would go. I thought "well maybe if it goes well it'll keep me on my horns a little bit more often and also it will help me just fill up my schedule and get some extra cash." Before doing Fiverr I used to be really critical about my saxophone playing feeling like "oh I don't do this like this player over here" or "that player over there is really really good at this approach", that sort of thing, and... not to brag, but to put it humbly, the response from Fiverr has been great! It's been really really positive. I've done something like over 580 projects on Fiverr, have a 5-star rating from about 99% of my clients, and that's fantastic! And it's made me realize that there's things in my playing that people appreciate and that they want to have... they want to have in their songs. (Sorry, I've got some people behind me I guess.) Anywhoo, if you're feeling in fear about your performance as a musician; as an audio professional; as a composer or sound designer, you know what? Keep it in check. Let some of that propel you and motivate you to get better, and let some of it just roll off your back because you want to keep your morale high. You want to keep your enthusiasm and you want to keep your self-confidence high. Artists just tend to be hypercritical of themselves. Artists to be very sensitive and feel like they suck. So there's this TED talk I watched and it discussed why people feel like others are more creative than they are and it's a real simple premise: When you look at someone else's finished work you don't see the whole process. You don't see all the doubt. You don't see all the terminal, or even just not knowing what to do next; the evolution of ideas that the person goes through to finally get to the end product. Instead you're seeing the end product, and you're saying "man, this is awesome, I could never do something like this." But that's just not reality. So what is the takeaway here? The takeaway is to have a healthy balance of being critical about yourself as a musician and also appreciating and recognizing what you do well. I think in the long run that can help keep you more motivated to stay in music, to stay on your horn, to stay on your instrument, to feel good about the efforts you're putting into it, and yeah... I'm gonna have a beer. [Out takes] [Wayback Machine Archive]
  12. The Indie Devs Nation is now very pleased to finally announce the release of the version 2.0 of the acclaimed Colossal Game Music Collection on the Unity Asset Store, a truly massive update featuring more than 2 GB of outstanding new game music taken from 20 five star rated music packs (rising the total size to an unbelievable 5 GB!). This new update took more than 6 months to finish and features diverse high-end music in such genres as Action, Emotional, Apocalyptic, Asian, Heavy Metal, Adventure, Sci-Fi, Casual, Piano and more! While this collection was already the biggest and most complete of its type, the 2.0 version now makes it absolutely unrivalled in both size and quality! The greatest news, however, is that, not only has the collection remained nearly at the same price, but we are also having a very special intro sale, selling it with 60% OFF for a very short period of time. So make sure to grab it while you can! Asset Store link: https://www.assetstore.unity3d.com/en/#!/content/88190 Track previews: https://soundcloud.com/t-i-d-n-music/sets/colossal-game-music-collection Here's the full list of packs included: - Action Music Vol. II - Adventure Music Vol. I - Heavy Metal Vol. II - Apocalyptic Music Vol. I - Medieval Music Vol. I - Sci-Fi Music Vol. II - Asian Music Vol. I - Emotional Music Vol. I - Casual Music Vol. I - Action Music Vol. III - Piano Music Vol. II - Fantasy Music Vol. I - Horror Music Vol. II - Heavy Metal Vol. I - Sci-Fi Music Vol. I - Chiptunes Vol. I - Piano Music Vol. I - Action Music Vol. I - Rock Music Vol. I - Horror Music Vol. I
  13. Sol_HSA

    SoLoud Audio Engine 20181119 Release

    SoLoud audio engine 2018119 has been released, and available at http://soloud-audio.com SoLoud is an easy to use, free, portable c/c++ audio engine for games. First release after 2 year burnout hiatus Hilights: FLAC, MP3 and various wav file formats through dr_flac, dr_mp3 and dr_wav Split SDL and SDL2 dll backends due to SDL2 doing stupid things unless told not to Removed modplug, added libmodplug dll interface Loop point support for all audio sources Wav files can now load from raw data Multi-speaker support Queues Many new small examples Piano demo now has padsynth Sanity test: over 200 tests to check if changes break playback Asserts playBackground helper interface to play audio without panning countAudioSource call to see how many instances of an audio source are playing PS Vita homebrew platform support Wave shaper, robotize filters Added more options to speech synth playback Removed many dynamic allocations Switched FFT implementations (again) Countless bug fixes and tweaks
  14. Professional Game Music Assets for FREE It is an extensive collection of looping music assets that is ready-to-use for the game development, and they can be used for commercial works. These assets can be used for all types of situations, such as combat, boss fights, dungeons, towns and events, 8 bit, SNES style, horror, and it is of the highest quality because it is produced by the pros of the game music industry. It provides professional assets which can be used with a wide range of game production environments, such as RPGmaker and Unity, free of charge. http://wingless-seraph.net/ How to Download They are categorized by purpose in the page linked above. For example, "Battle", ”Dungeon", "Horror" , "8 bit", "SNES style" ...and such like. You can choose any category and download mp3 and .zip (including looping ogg and m4a.) for FREE. (The example below is a page of battle music.) And also, a lot of Sound FX and voice assets is in here. There are over 800 audio assets for creating game in this website!! Terms of Use All assets are free of charge, but all copyrights vest with "YouFulca". The assets cannot be repackaged on a CD or in data form for resale or distribution. You are of course welcome to store them on a CD, iPod, or other media for your own personal use. Assets can be freely edited to suit your needs. You can also cut and loop pieces from a song or add effects to a voice asset to make it sound like a different person. Almost all audio assets on this website can be used with any game development tools. and please check the detail in this page.
  15. Royalty Free Music for Game Developers If you found this page, you probably wondered at some point, "Why is it called Royalty Free Music when none of it is FREE?!" and maybe you already learned the definition of Royalty Free does not necessarily mean the content itself is free but rather refers to the "right to use copyrighted material without the need to pay license fees or usage fees." To put it simply, Royalty Free just means you don't have to pay to use the content. So why do so many people charge for it, and isn't that exactly the opposite of what Royalty Free means? Obviously artists and content makers who spend a lot of effort making something should be rewarded for their time, but in my opinion, they should not use the term "Royalty Free" to refer to their paid content. That is why I developed a FREE Royalty Free Music for YouTube Library for anyone and everyone who is looking for free professional music to use in their films, television shows, youtube promos, video games, you get the picture. How to Download To begin, simply choose a category of music from the list on the website linked above: Once you have selected your desired category of music, hover your mouse or finger over it and click the red button that appears to open up a small window with a media player in it that will look something like this: Click a song to listen to it, and click the down arrow to download the song, it's that easy! Licensing & Copyright Information If you like the song and you want to use it in a non-commercial project (something that does not earn you money) you can do that for free simply by attributing me in your credits somewhere! Just put "Music by Jordan Winslow on https://jordanwinslow.me/royaltyfreemusic" or simply "Music Downloaded from https://jordanwinslow.me/royaltyfreemusic" If you would like to use the music in a commercial project (something that earns you money) there is still no charge, but one more step: simply fill out the Royalty Free Music Commercial License Request Form. Downloading Free Royalty Free Music for your YouTube creations has never been so easy!