• Advertisement

Search the Community

Showing results for tags 'Open Source'.



More search options

  • Search By Tags

    Type tags separated by commas.
  • Search By Author

Content Type


Categories

  • Audio
    • Music and Sound FX
  • Business
    • Business and Law
    • Career Development
    • Production and Management
  • Game Design
    • Game Design and Theory
    • Writing for Games
    • UX for Games
  • Industry
    • Interviews
    • Event Coverage
  • Programming
    • Artificial Intelligence
    • General and Gameplay Programming
    • Graphics and GPU Programming
    • Engines and Middleware
    • Math and Physics
    • Networking and Multiplayer
  • Visual Arts
  • Archive

Categories

  • News

Categories

  • Audio
  • Visual Arts
  • Programming
  • Writing

Categories

  • GameDev Unboxed

Categories

  • Game Dev Loadout

Forums

  • Audio
    • Music and Sound FX
  • Business
    • Games Career Development
    • Production and Management
    • Games Business and Law
  • Game Design
    • Game Design and Theory
    • Writing for Games
  • Programming
    • Artificial Intelligence
    • Engines and Middleware
    • General and Gameplay Programming
    • Graphics and GPU Programming
    • Math and Physics
    • Networking and Multiplayer
  • Visual Arts
    • 2D and 3D Art
    • Critique and Feedback
  • Topical
    • Virtual and Augmented Reality
    • News
  • Community
    • GameDev Challenges
    • For Beginners
    • GDNet+ Member Forum
    • GDNet Lounge
    • GDNet Comments, Suggestions, and Ideas
    • Coding Horrors
    • Your Announcements
    • Hobby Project Classifieds
    • Indie Showcase
    • Article Writing
  • Affiliates
    • NeHe Productions
    • AngelCode
  • Workshops
    • C# Workshop
    • CPP Workshop
    • Freehand Drawing Workshop
    • Hands-On Interactive Game Development
    • SICP Workshop
    • XNA 4.0 Workshop
  • Archive
    • Topical
    • Affiliates
    • Contests
    • Technical

Calendars

  • Community Calendar
  • Games Industry Events
  • Game Jams

Blogs

There are no results to display.

There are no results to display.

Marker Groups

  • Members

Developers

Developers


Group


About Me


Website


Industry Role


Twitter


Github


Twitch


Steam

Found 34 results

  1. Hi, We are about finished with our new word spelling game: "LettersFall 110%™". We need help testing the Android version of the game now. You can get everything at below GitHub web page: https://github.com/JeZ-l-Lee/LettersFall_110Percent (Android version link on Google Play, HTML5 version link, & full source code) Game source code is 100% M.I.T. open-source! Game was made using current AppGameKit 2. Let us know about any issues or suggestions for improvement. Many thanks! JeZxLee
  2. Hello, I am Argen and I have tried to make a game for some time. However, I recently found out that for my idea, an open source would be best. However, the modeler we have right now does not animate or make his 3d models low-poly, and he needs somebody that can do that. So what we ask for is a junior artist that will join in with this volunteer position. If you are able to animate and/or help finish up his models, then that would be great. The game itself is a rogue like dungeon where you play as a Roman fighting off the hordes of mythology. It is an open source game, so just about anybody can join in with my permission. If you are interested, email me at tfranknorth@gmail.com. You need to be open to using discord to communicate, for that is where most of our team is. Attached is a piece of our modeler's art. Be sure you are fit to work on it! Thanks! Argen.
  3. tldr: This is a community project to help aspiring solo game developers and designers, through small assignment projects, gain the knowledge and skills required to make a video game. If you are interested in contributing to the discussion, head to https://github.com/Neoflash1979/learn-gamedev/issues. The problem with tutorials With the number of great courses, tutorials and other learning resources found online, more and more people teach themselves programming. Many will do so with the intent of making video games. But there is much more to designing and making video games than mere programming. Animation, anthropology, architecture, brainstorming, business, cinematography, communication, creative writing, economics, engineering, games, history, management, mathematics, music, psychology, public speaking, sound design, technical writing, visual arts AND programming; knowledge and skills in these areas can be invaluable to a game designer/developer. Thankfully, there is an abundance of resources available online that can help one acquire knowledge and skills in each of these areas individually. But for the aspiring solo dev, it’s not just a matter of acquiring knowledge in these areas, it’s also important to understand how to use all of that together, for the express purpose of making a video game. There is a plethora of tutorials available online that will guide you from A to Z on how to make such or such a game. In the process you will acquire a certain amount of technical knowledge, and that’s great. But you won’t really learn about the process of designing and developing a video game. The same can be said about the numerous lists that tells you the type of games you should be making, and in what order, in order to learn gaming making; first you make a Breakout clone, then you make a Tetris clone, then you make a Mario clone, then you make Wolfenstein 3D clone, etc. Again, this kind of advice will help you progress in certain technical skills, but you won’t have learned all that much about the process of designing and developing a video game. Making a video game is about making decisions. When you follow tutorials, or clone an existing game, the decisions are largely already made for you. To really learn to design and develop video games, you have to build them, from scratch, on your own (or with a friend or two). All aspiring game dev/designer realizes this at some point and so sets out to build their first game. Their REAL first game. One where THEY have to decide, design and build EVERYTHING. And that’s where everything goes to sh*t. Making video games is hard You see, making a video game is hard. I mean, REALLY making a game, from scratch. It is a daunting task and it can be overwhelming. So naturally, you turn to Google, and you learn expressions like “scope”, “minimum viable product”, “rapid prototyping”, “find the fun” and “start small”. All those two minutes videos and articles are very enlightening but in the end, it’s still very hard to understand how to keep a small scope when you have never REALLY made a game and you are invariably imbued with grand game-making aspirations. How small is small? What aspects of game making should I focus on? How many hours should I invest in making that first game? Those are just a few of the questions that an aspiring game dev/designer might have. Despite all the great resources out there for learning all the bits and pieces involved in designing and making a game, there is a complete void in terms of helping aspiring dev learning to put it all together in a progressive, manageable, way. What we, aspiring self-taught devs, are missing is a guide. Something that will guide us, progressively, on our game making path. Something that will help us focus on the right things, at the right time, while we progress on our learning journey – “yeah, maybe you should leave researching the use of Octrees in collision avoidance AI for later and first focus on figuring out how to make that white ball go from point A to point B, Phil”. What we really need are assignments, with deadlines and requirements. Oddly enough, if your Google “game making assignments” you will find a few examples of exactly what we need, but only for board games, or children Phys Ed games. Here is an example: http://www.cobblearning.net/kentblog/files/2015/11/Project-27w5me1.pdf This is exactly what we need. Exercises that help us focus our creativity and give us a set of guidelines, requirements and constraints. Allowing us to make MOST or at least MANY of the creative and technical decisions that go into making a game, while at the same time ensuring that we keep the scope small and that we focus on a few new concepts/skills. Every assignment would, gradually, expose the learner to new and more advanced concepts/skills, expanding the scope a little, culminating in a final, 2 to 6-month-long assignment where the learner is really making a game he can be proud of and call his own. Alas, this resource does not exist. At least I have found it. So, let’s do something about it. I propose that we create an open-source project on Github and create a “Game development and design self-education” curriculum. Basically, a list of game making assignments that would guide an aspiring game dev through the process of learning the required skills, methods and processes required to put a game together. The onus would be on the aspiring game dev to find the resources needed to learn the creative and technical skills required to meet each assignment’s requirements. If you are interested in contributing to the discussion, head to https://github.com/Neoflash1979/learn-gamedev/issues.
  4. I took a look at Real-Time Character Dismemberment (Game Engine Gems 1 - Chapter 19), I guess I see this technique has been used in GTA III when the player can shoot the NPC's arm off. I'm truly interested in this gore thing. Has anyone made a demo of this technique in Ogre3D? (Or Unity/CryEngine/Unreal... But I think the demo for Ogre3D is best because it's a solid open-source graphic engine, accessible for everyone)
  5. Ever feel like your inventory could use a couple of extra localization tools? We asked the studios we work with, skimmed forums and analyzed product reviews to gather some of the most popular pieces of software, Unity assets and resources in the game development community. This localization toolbox is expected to grow and become a handy guide to the best game localization tools available for developers, so feel free to suggest new additions! Unity assets TextMesh - A must-have text rendering solution The reviews from the Asset Store say it all: TextMesh is a must-have if you're developing your game with Unity. Advanced text rendering, great flexibility and FREE. What are you waiting for? Lean Localization - Simple but powerful Another great free asset, probably more suitable for smaller projects that don’t have a lot of UI text. Lean Localization has a practical feature which allows you to change language while your game is running. I2 Localization - All inclusive Despite being paid, I2 Localization is a favorite in the gamedev community, which really says something. The fact that localizable strings are stored in a Google Spreadsheet that can be reloaded while your game is running is probable no stranger to that. Oh, and it’s also compatible with TextMesh Pro! Bad Word Filter - Keep it friendly, keep it safe! This asset’s name is self-explanatory. Keep your game suitable for younger audiences, or filter haters’ bad language in 24 languages. You can even let your creativity flow and add words to the list! How ******* great is that? SmartLocalization - Fallen, but not forgotten Even though development was discontinued earlier this year, SmartLocalization remains a pretty practical and popular asset. It allows you to create your folder structure for different languages, as well as import and export your files. The machine translation feature powered by Bing Translator can also serve as a way to test your UI and spot problems with the length of text (say “Hi” to your German-speaking friends). Fonts Font Creator - Pimp my font Recommended by many developers, including our friends at Jumb-O-Fun. Afraid to take the leap with custom fonts? Fear not and follow the guide: Google Noto Fonts - Google is your friend for fonts too Google has been developing a font family called Noto, which aims to support all languages with a harmonious look and feel. Noto has multiple styles and weights, and is FREE. Localized strings Polyglot - Free localized strings There are several free game localization projects out there, but very few can actually be trusted. Although it doesn’t match professional localization quality, Polyglot is definitely your best option for free localized strings, as our professional game translators attested to. A good way to save a couple of bucks if your game has a lot of generic strings or minimal content! Translation tools SmartCAT - A solid & free translation tool for your localization team SmartCAT is probably the best free CAT tool at the moment if you manage localization yourself for confidentiality reasons, or you have your own localization team. It has all the main features you would expect from a translation tool (translation memory, glossary, workflow, ability to restrict access to source files) without all the cumbersome settings and functions nobody really uses for game localization. It’s cloud-based, which means your team can access your localization project from anywhere. All you need to do is assign everyone a role (translator, proofreader, project manager), invite them and they’re good to go. Crowdin - Easily crowdsource your game’s localization It’s easy to understand why Crowdin is so popular with studios that decide to crowdsource their game’s localization. With this platform, you can easily set up and automate the whole process.To crowdsource translations upload your files, invite fans to translate and allow them to vote for the best translations. You can order professional translations from the vendors cooperating with Crowdin, assign tasks to your in-house translators or your localization service provider. Set up integration with GitHub, GitLab, Bitbucket, Android Studio, Google Play, and more to automate the synchronization of source and localized files. Last but not least, easily ensure quality and consistency of translations with features like glossaries, translation memory, screenshots, quality assurance checks, and other features Crowdin has to offer. These could also come in handy... TinyTake - for contextualization If a picture’s worth a thousand words, a 60 fps video is priceless for your translators! They can finally make sense of that super weird creature’s attack no one can really describe then translate it accordingly. Just upload your videos to the cloud directly from TinyTake and share the link with your localization team! They’ll love you for that *hearts*. Free up to 2GB, which is more than enough for a localization project. Fastlane - for ASO Automate taking localized screenshots of your iOS app on every device. ChatMapper - for branching dialogues ChatMapper makes it easy to test conversations, control their flow and visualize nonlinear branching dialogues – it can even generate scripts for your voice actors. All this in one tool, yep! Professional game translators - for context-rich and error-proof translations Well, no matter how good all these tools are, there will always translators at the end of the line and the quality of their work does make a difference. Those guys better be good too if you don’t want to see all your efforts ruined by either hilarious or offensive translations. So if you truly want to take over the world and make the most of your hard work developing your game, drop us a line and get kickass localization by our game translators What are your favorite localization assets? Got some awesome tool every game developer should know about? As usual, let us know in the comments. This post is YOURS, so let's make it a reference for the whole gamedev community!
  6. Hi, You can get everything at below URL link: http://16bitsoft.com/2017/12/07/new-project-digital-crack-started/ Enjoy! JeZxLee
  7. Atum Engine

    Atum engine is a newcomer in a row of game engines. Most game engines focus on render techniques in features list. The main task of Atum is to deliver the best toolset; that’s why, as I hope, Atum will be a good light weighted alternative to Unity for indie games. Atum already has fully workable editor that has an ability to play test edited scene. All system code has simple ideas behind them and focuses on easy to use functionality. That’s why code is minimized as much as possible. Currently the engine consists from: - Scene Editor with ability to play test edited scene; - Powerful system for binding properties into the editor; - Render system based on DX11 but created as multi API; so, adding support of another GAPI is planned; - Controls system based on aliases; - Font system based on stb_truetype.h; - Support of PhysX 3.0, there are samples in repo that use physics; - Network code which allows to create server/clinet; there is some code in repo which allows to create a simple network game I plan to use this engine in multiplayer game - so, I definitely will evolve the engine. Also I plan to add support for mobile devices. And of course, the main focus is to create a toolset that will ease games creation. Link to repo on source code is - https://github.com/ENgineE777/Atum Video of work process in track based editor can be at follow link:
  8. Java Java Network Library

    Hello everyone! I have a GitHub repository on which I'm developing a Open Network Library for Java Developers and I'd like to share it so more people come in and contribute. Till now the repo is being developed only by me so the library is not 100% bug free. I'd really like this repo to be famous and got people working on it! [You will find more information in the repo] Here's the link for the repo: https://github.com/giannismarinakis/java-open-nl Thanks!
  9. Isosurface extraction library in Rust

    Pictured are outputs of the Marching Cubes algorithm (left), and surface reconstruction via 'Deferred Rasterisation' (right). These are examples from a little library I wrote for Rust, that provides various implementations of isosurface extraction from volume data. You can find the Apache-2.0 licensed source code on github, or the Rust package on crates.io.
  10. For our team, developing Creature Quest, the mobile strategy RPG, has been a thrilling adventure all its own. It’s been a journey where our heroic development team needed to slay the fearsome monsters of scaling, client-versus-server data handling, and other tricky impediments – all so that the peace of a seamless player experience may reign throughout the game’s world. Completing our quest required gathering artifacts of power, from a trustworthy game engine to a database capable of delivering us to our destiny. Our team of experienced PC game development professionals set out as a new company looking to explore the rapidly growing realm of mobile gaming. At its head was Jon Van Caneghem, the creator of the Might and Magic and Heroes of Might and Magic game series. In looking to provide the same enchantment of those games via a mobile experience, our team began learning the lore of the smaller-screen landscape, investigating technology options and the standard stacks while strategizing over how to overcome certain technical obstacles. We had experience using Node.js and knew that we wanted a document database. That led us to vetting open source NoSQL options, and we found MongoDB to be a strong fit for the task at hand. However, as a startup with a small team that didn’t happen to include a dedicated MongoDB expert, the work of implementing and managing this database soon proved daunting. Our limited resources also meant efficiency and a tight focus on actual game development were essential to getting Creature Quest off the ground, making the prospect of adding an expensive MongoDB expert to the internal team even less likely. Still, the situation called for putting expert database management into place. Given that the potential user base for a mobile game includes nearly everyone who owns a smartphone, overnight success could mean profound database scalability stresses requiring true expertise to navigate. Ultimately, we decided on a hosted MongoDB strategy that could deliver this proficiency, and affordably achieve the required scalability and reliability while also keeping database management off of the internal engineering team’s plate. The MongoDB database provider mLab had worked well throughout a free trial and assessment period, and allowed us to begin on a small service plan and then easily scale as needed. In searching for the best framework for building Creature Quest’s client-side app, we sought a solution that could deploy the app to the iOS, Android, and Android for Amazon platforms. For this we chose the Marmalade SDK and game engine, which enabled us to create C++ code and deploy native apps for each of the mobile platforms we targeted. As for the rest of our stack, the Lua programming language saw the most use by our team, with Marmalade offering the integrations required between Lua and the C++ core engine. The libcurl library was also selected to communicate with a backend NodeJS REST API server, while the Mongoose NodeJS library for MongoDB served as a middleware layer. Data flows through this system with the client app first sending requests to the NodeJS server, which in turn sends calls to store or retrieve data in the database. NodeJS supports greater scalability by operating asynchronously, as concurrent handling of requests vastly increases the scale of data the system can process. Throughout this game development journey, one of the most challenging strategic issues we’ve faced is in striking the balance between handling data on the client or the server. To safeguard the integrity of game data, our early test versions of the game required the client to verify all data with the server. This succeeded in making sure that players couldn’t use hacked versions of the client to cheat – unfortunately it also reduced the game’s performance to a stuttering mess. In mobile gaming, a velvety smooth play experience is a requisite: players will quickly abandon apps with performance issues. So we adapted, allowing for unverified data to accumulate on the client and be saved to the server only at key transitional moments within the gameplay. For crucial data transactions such as in-game purchases, we focused on getting the architecture around those sequences just right, while at the same time concentrating QA efforts to be certain that the app wouldn’t crash when critical player data could be lost. As the adventure of developing Creature Quest continues, the journey is already riddled with milestones, including a successful worldwide launch and a loyal and growing audience. But the game’s promising outlook is really helped by the fact that we have trustworthy technology and an effective data strategy in place going forward.
  11. Effekseer Project develops "Effekseer," which is visual software for creating open source games; on November 1, I released "Effekseer 1.3," which is the latest major version release. With Effekseer, you can easily create various visual effects simply by specifying different parameters. Effekseer is a tool to create various visual effects used in games and others. You can create various visual effects such as explosion, light emission, and particles. Effekseer's effect creation tool works only on Windows. However, the created visual effects can be viewed on Mac OS X, Linux, iOS, Android, and other environments using plugins runtime / plugins such as DirectX, OpenGL, and Unity. Effekseer 1.3 is an updated version of Effekseer 1.2 released in June 2016. This update contains the following changes: -Addition of a file viewer that makes it easy to manage effect files; -Improvements in UI such as adding icons for easy understanding of editing status; -Addition of a function to read FBX as a 3D model file; -Addition of parameters for easier control of the effects. In addition to Unity, I have added plugins / libraries to UnrealEngine 4 and Cocos2d-x. This makes it possible to play effects in most major development environments.Besides that, more than 70 new sample effects have been added and many bugs have been fixed. Effekseer 1.3 is available on the project website. The license for the software is the MIT license. Effekseer http://effekseer.github.io/ Github https://github.com/effekseer/Effekseer
  12. Effekseer Project develops "Effekseer," which is visual software for creating open source games; on November 1, I released "Effekseer 1.3," which is the latest major version release. With Effekseer, you can easily create various visual effects simply by specifying different parameters. Effekseer is a tool to create various visual effects used in games and others. You can create various visual effects such as explosion, light emission, and particles. Effekseer's effect creation tool works only on Windows. However, the created visual effects can be viewed on Mac OS X, Linux, iOS, Android, and other environments using plugins runtime / plugins such as DirectX, OpenGL, and Unity. Effekseer 1.3 is an updated version of Effekseer 1.2 released in June 2016. This update contains the following changes: -Addition of a file viewer that makes it easy to manage effect files; -Improvements in UI such as adding icons for easy understanding of editing status; -Addition of a function to read FBX as a 3D model file; -Addition of parameters for easier control of the effects. In addition to Unity, I have added plugins / libraries to UnrealEngine 4 and Cocos2d-x. This makes it possible to play effects in most major development environments.Besides that, more than 70 new sample effects have been added and many bugs have been fixed. Effekseer 1.3 is available on the project website. The license for the software is the MIT license. Effekseer http://effekseer.github.io/ Github https://github.com/effekseer/Effekseer View full story
  13. Free software 1. Lumberyard (Game engine) open-source and free tool Amazon Lumberyard is a free cross-platform triple-A game engine developed by Amazon and based on the architecture of Cry Engine, which was licensed from Crytek in 2015. 2. Sculptris (sculpture tool) open-source and free tool Sculptris is a virtual sculpting software program, with a primary focus on the concept of modeling clay. It entered active development in early December 2009, and the most recent release was in 2011. 3. Make human (game model creator) open-source and free tool Make human is an open-source 3D computer graphics software middleware designed for the prototyping of photorealistic humanoids. It is developed by a community of programmers, artists, and academics interested in 3D modeling of characters. 4. Ipi soft (motion capture software) not free tool iPi Motion Capture is a scalable markerless motion capture software tool that supports 1 or 2 Kinect cameras or 3 to 6 Sony PlayStation Eye cameras to track a human action and convert it into a motion capture file 5. Blender (Complete tool) for modeling, texturing and so on (open-source and free tool) Blender is a professional, free and open-source 3D computer graphics software toolset used for creating animated films, visual effects, art, 3D printed models, interactive 3D applications and video games. 6. Audacity (music editor) open-source and free tool Audacity is a free open source digital audio editor and recording computer software application, available for Windows, OS X, Linux and other operating systems. 7. Awesome bump (bump map editor) open-source and free tool (optional) Awesome Bump is a free program written using Qt library designed to generate normal, height, specular or ambient occlusion textures from a single image. 8. Faceware (facial animation) not free tool Faceware Technologies is an American company that designs facial animation and motion capture technology. The company was established under Image Metrics and became its own company at the beginning of 2012. 9. GIMP (image editing) open-source and free tool GIMP is a free and open-source raster graphics editor used for image retouching and editing, free-form drawing, converting between different image formats, and more specialized tasks. Through this you can also create bump maps 10. Meshlab (mesh repair) open-source and free tool (Optional) MeshLab is an advanced 3D mesh processing software system that is oriented to the management and processing of unstructured large meshes and provides a set of tools for editing, cleaning, healing. 11. LibreOffice (create documents) open-source and free tool LibreOffice is a free and open source office suite, a project of The Document Foundation. It was forked from OpenOffice.org in 2010, which was an open-sourced version of the earlier StarOffice. 12. Atom (coding software) open-source and free tool Atom is a free and open-source text and source code editor for macOS, Linux, and Microsoft Windows with support for plug-ins written in Node.js, and embedded Git Control, developed by GitHub. Useful websites free image Reference images will be found on Pinterest Free Sounds 1. Freesound.org 2. 99Sounds.org 3. NoiseForFun.com 4. Incompetech.com 5. OpenGameArt.org 6. RaisedBeaches.com 7. Musopen.org 8. PlayonLoop.com 9. Bensound.com 10. SoundJay.com 11. Dig.ccmixter.org 12. Soundgator.com 13. Pacdv.com 14. Freesfx.co.uk 15. Soundtrack.imphenzia.com 16. Bxfr.net Download the free music tracks from these websites 1. http://incompetech.com/music/ 2. http://dig.ccmixter.org/ 3. http://www.joshwoodward.com 4. http://www.youtube.com/audiolibrary I hope this information will help full to you. I am got so stress to collect this data so don't waste it 🤗🤗🤗🤗🤗🤗🤗🤗🤗🤗🤗🤗🤗🤗🤗🤔🤔🤔🤔🤔🤔🤔🤔🤔🤔🤔🤔🤔🤔🤔
  14. I just recently start using OpenAL soft (actually not really use, I'm still struggle with setting this up). Setup OpenAL soft - Passed First, I grab the source of OpenAL soft, I just run CMake for this and build, here the CMake result. Using DirectX SDK directory: C:/Program Files (x86)/Microsoft DirectX SDK (June 2010)/ Could NOT find ALSA (missing: ALSA_LIBRARY ALSA_INCLUDE_DIR) Could NOT find OSS (missing: OSS_INCLUDE_DIR) Could NOT find AudioIO (missing: AUDIOIO_INCLUDE_DIR) Could NOT find SoundIO (missing: SOUNDIO_LIBRARY SOUNDIO_INCLUDE_DIR) Could NOT find QSA (missing: QSA_LIBRARY QSA_INCLUDE_DIR) Could NOT find PortAudio (missing: PORTAUDIO_LIBRARY PORTAUDIO_INCLUDE_DIR) Could NOT find PulseAudio (missing: PULSEAUDIO_LIBRARY PULSEAUDIO_INCLUDE_DIR) Could NOT find JACK (missing: JACK_LIBRARY JACK_INCLUDE_DIR) CMake Warning at utils/alsoft-config/CMakeLists.txt:13 (find_package): By not providing "FindQt5Widgets.cmake" in CMAKE_MODULE_PATH this project has asked CMake to find a package configuration file provided by "Qt5Widgets", but CMake did not find one. Could not find a package configuration file provided by "Qt5Widgets" with any of the following names: Qt5WidgetsConfig.cmake qt5widgets-config.cmake Add the installation prefix of "Qt5Widgets" to CMAKE_PREFIX_PATH or set "Qt5Widgets_DIR" to a directory containing one of the above files. If "Qt5Widgets" provides a separate development package or SDK, be sure it has been installed. Found unsuitable Qt version "" from NOTFOUND Could NOT find SDL2 (missing: SDL2_LIBRARY SDL2_INCLUDE_DIR) Building OpenAL with support for the following backends: WinMM, DirectSound, MMDevApi, WaveFile, Null Building with support for CPU extensions: Default, SSE, SSE2, SSE3, SSE4.1 Installing sample configuration Installing HRTF definitions Installing AmbDec presets Building utility programs Building test programs Building example programs Configuring done Generating done So I see that I have no Qt & SDL2 for my OpenAL-soft, hope that ok (I don't even know what it for, as long as the I can build OpenAL-soft, I don't really care) So setup OpenAL-soft seem easy. Setup alure - failed I got trouble when I setup alure, I setup CMake like this: OPENAL_INCLUDE_DIR = E:/Source/openal-soft/include/AL OPENAL_LIBRARY = E:/Source/_build/openal-soft/Release And I get the CMake result like this: Found OpenAL: E:/Source/_build/openal-soft/Release Could NOT find OGG (missing: OGG_LIBRARY OGG_INCLUDE_DIR) Could NOT find SndFile (missing: SNDFILE_LIBRARY SNDFILE_INCLUDE_DIR) Could NOT find MPG123 (missing: MPG123_LIBRARY MPG123_INCLUDE_DIR) Could NOT find PhysFS (missing: PHYSFS_LIBRARY PHYSFS_INCLUDE_DIR) Could NOT find DUMB (missing: DUMB_LIBRARY DUMB_INCLUDE_DIR) Configuring done WARNING: Target "alure2" requests linking to directory "E:/Source/_build/openal-soft/Release". Targets may link only to libraries. CMake is dropping the item. WARNING: Target "alure2" requests linking to directory "E:/Source/_build/openal-soft/Release". Targets may link only to libraries. CMake is dropping the item. WARNING: Target "alure2" requests linking to directory "E:/Source/_build/openal-soft/Release". Targets may link only to libraries. CMake is dropping the item. WARNING: Target "alure2" requests linking to directory "E:/Source/_build/openal-soft/Release". Targets may link only to libraries. CMake is dropping the item. WARNING: Target "alure2_s" requests linking to directory "E:/Source/_build/openal-soft/Release". Targets may link only to libraries. CMake is dropping the item. WARNING: Target "alure2_s" requests linking to directory "E:/Source/_build/openal-soft/Release". Targets may link only to libraries. CMake is dropping the item. WARNING: Target "alure2_s" requests linking to directory "E:/Source/_build/openal-soft/Release". Targets may link only to libraries. CMake is dropping the item. WARNING: Target "alure2_s" requests linking to directory "E:/Source/_build/openal-soft/Release". Targets may link only to libraries. CMake is dropping the item. WARNING: Target "alure-play" requests linking to directory "E:/Source/_build/openal-soft/Release". Targets may link only to libraries. CMake is dropping the item. WARNING: Target "alure-play" requests linking to directory "E:/Source/_build/openal-soft/Release". Targets may link only to libraries. CMake is dropping the item. WARNING: Target "alure-play" requests linking to directory "E:/Source/_build/openal-soft/Release". Targets may link only to libraries. CMake is dropping the item. WARNING: Target "alure-play" requests linking to directory "E:/Source/_build/openal-soft/Release". Targets may link only to libraries. CMake is dropping the item. WARNING: Target "alure-enum" requests linking to directory "E:/Source/_build/openal-soft/Release". Targets may link only to libraries. CMake is dropping the item. WARNING: Target "alure-enum" requests linking to directory "E:/Source/_build/openal-soft/Release". Targets may link only to libraries. CMake is dropping the item. WARNING: Target "alure-enum" requests linking to directory "E:/Source/_build/openal-soft/Release". Targets may link only to libraries. CMake is dropping the item. WARNING: Target "alure-enum" requests linking to directory "E:/Source/_build/openal-soft/Release". Targets may link only to libraries. CMake is dropping the item. WARNING: Target "alure-hrtf" requests linking to directory "E:/Source/_build/openal-soft/Release". Targets may link only to libraries. CMake is dropping the item. WARNING: Target "alure-hrtf" requests linking to directory "E:/Source/_build/openal-soft/Release". Targets may link only to libraries. CMake is dropping the item. WARNING: Target "alure-hrtf" requests linking to directory "E:/Source/_build/openal-soft/Release". Targets may link only to libraries. CMake is dropping the item. WARNING: Target "alure-hrtf" requests linking to directory "E:/Source/_build/openal-soft/Release". Targets may link only to libraries. CMake is dropping the item. WARNING: Target "alure-reverb" requests linking to directory "E:/Source/_build/openal-soft/Release". Targets may link only to libraries. CMake is dropping the item. WARNING: Target "alure-reverb" requests linking to directory "E:/Source/_build/openal-soft/Release". Targets may link only to libraries. CMake is dropping the item. WARNING: Target "alure-reverb" requests linking to directory "E:/Source/_build/openal-soft/Release". Targets may link only to libraries. CMake is dropping the item. WARNING: Target "alure-reverb" requests linking to directory "E:/Source/_build/openal-soft/Release". Targets may link only to libraries. CMake is dropping the item. WARNING: Target "alure-stream" requests linking to directory "E:/Source/_build/openal-soft/Release". Targets may link only to libraries. CMake is dropping the item. WARNING: Target "alure-stream" requests linking to directory "E:/Source/_build/openal-soft/Release". Targets may link only to libraries. CMake is dropping the item. WARNING: Target "alure-stream" requests linking to directory "E:/Source/_build/openal-soft/Release". Targets may link only to libraries. CMake is dropping the item. WARNING: Target "alure-stream" requests linking to directory "E:/Source/_build/openal-soft/Release". Targets may link only to libraries. CMake is dropping the item. Generating done So there are a lot of warnings. I lookup this warning and seem that this is just about the CMake programming inside the file CMakeLists.txt, for the meantime, I'll ignore it. Then I open the alure solution (alure.sln) with Visual Studio and build. Unfortunately, I got compile error Severity Code Description Project File Line Suppression State Error C3861 'strcasecmp': identifier not found alure-hrtf E:\Source\alure\examples\alure-hrtf.cpp 49 Error C3861 'strcasecmp': identifier not found alure-hrtf E:\Source\alure\examples\alure-hrtf.cpp 69 Error C3861 'strcasecmp': identifier not found alure-reverb E:\Source\alure\examples\alure-reverb.cpp 178 Error C3861 'strcasecmp': identifier not found alure-reverb E:\Source\alure\examples\alure-reverb.cpp 185 Error C4576 a parenthesized type followed by an initializer list is a non-standard explicit type conversion syntax alure2 e:\source\alure\src\auxeffectslot.h 31 Error C4576 a parenthesized type followed by an initializer list is a non-standard explicit type conversion syntax alure2_s e:\source\alure\src\auxeffectslot.h 31 Error C4576 a parenthesized type followed by an initializer list is a non-standard explicit type conversion syntax alure2 e:\source\alure\src\auxeffectslot.h 31 Error C4576 a parenthesized type followed by an initializer list is a non-standard explicit type conversion syntax alure2_s e:\source\alure\src\auxeffectslot.h 31 Error C4576 a parenthesized type followed by an initializer list is a non-standard explicit type conversion syntax alure2 e:\source\alure\src\auxeffectslot.h 31 Error C4576 a parenthesized type followed by an initializer list is a non-standard explicit type conversion syntax alure2_s e:\source\alure\src\auxeffectslot.h 31 Error LNK1104 cannot open file 'Debug\alure2.lib' alure-enum E:\Source\_build\alure\LINK 1 Error LNK1104 cannot open file 'Debug\alure2.lib' alure-stream E:\Source\_build\alure\LINK 1 Error LNK1104 cannot open file 'Debug\alure2.lib' alure-play E:\Source\_build\alure\LINK 1 I try to lookup the error: //Error: a parenthesized type followed by an initializer list is a non-standard explicit type conversion syntax //Cause by code: void addSourceSend(Source source, ALuint send) { mSourceSends.emplace_back((SourceSend){source, send}); } But I can't find any clue, and the syntax of this code is really weird. So how can I build alure from source? Please help me A minor confuse about OpenAL soft This is a little off topic, but I can't help asking. there is the text inside the ReadMe.txt of the package: openal-soft-1.18.2-bin.zip that I find confusing: I thought OpenAL soft is stand-alone package, but here is the note about OpenAL redistributable. So if I build OpenAL-soft from source, should I concern about this? And if I need, what I should do with this? My guess is: require the users to install OpenAL redistributable from Creative Labs. Thanks for reading
  15. Hello, I just found out about https://github.com/shader-slang/slang. It's a shader language and accompanied by a library that is supposed to make it easier to work with modular shaders. What do you think about that? Here is the paper that describes the concept: http://graphics.cs.cmu.edu/projects/shadercomp/he17_shadercomp.pdf Thanks in advance
  16. Hello! I'm making the CadEditor utility. This is a universal level map editor for NES / SMD games, used to inplace change ROM files. The program has been done for a long time to edit a couple of old console games, now I have to do a little bit of updating it, perhaps turning it into a block editor, like Tiled. Would anyone be interested in such a tool, or is there enough of the existing map editors functionality? And other question. It's possible to do export blocks from all the games already supported by the editor to tileset, and the map itself to the TMX format supported by Tiled editor, as well by many engines - so you can immediately get blocks and a game map from some old games for experiments with them into modern engines. Will anyone need this feature, if I implement it?
  17. I am trying to implement status effects in my game but I have not quite been able to get the hang of it. Do you have to make a large number of classes for different kinds of status effects? Or is it possible to do it with just 1, or a small number of classes?
  18. There's a C++ library I'm developing and while it's not specifically targeted at games, all projects that I know of which use it are games. It's called DynaMix. In short it allows you to compose and modify polymorphic objects at run time. This has proven to be rather useful in gameplay programming. Compared to more traditional ways to write gameplay, like scripting, it has some benefits (well, and some drawbacks). It's C++ so it usually is at least a bit faster (and in the cases that I know of a lot faster) and less power consuming than scripts You can reduce code complexity when you don't have a C++<->scripting language binding layer. You can reuse utility code between the core and gameplay subsystems (instead of having to rewrite it in the scripting language. Hotswapping is supported relatively easily achievable Still, it's C++ so I guess it's a bit harder to write, and impossible to delegate to game-designers and other non-programmers Because of this it has found a niche of sorts in mobile games, where the benefits from the performance and smaller power consumption outweigh the fact that the gameplay code is strictly programmer country (whereas desktop/console developers, might be less willing to pay this price) The repository is here: https://github.com/iboB/dynamix The docs are here: https://ibob.github.io/dynamix/ I have written about it before back when it used to be called Boost.Mixin. I have since rebranded it and removed the dependency on Boost. Recently I released a new version and I'm using this as an opportunity to gather more feedback and, perhaps, maybe new users. So, any comments and questions are welcome
  19. Hi everyone, I've shared my 2D Game Engine source code. It's the result of 4 years working on it (and I still continue improving features ) and I want to share with the community. You can see some videos on youtube and some demo gifs on my twitter account. This Engine has been developed as End-of-Degree Project and it is coded in Javascript, WebGL and GLSL. The engine is written from scratch. This is not a professional engine but it's for learning purposes, so anyone can review the code an learn basis about graphics, physics or game engine architecture. Source code on this GitHub repository. I'm available for a good conversation about Game Engine / Graphics Programming
  20. I would like to introduce the first version of my physically based camera rendering library, written in C++, called PhysiCam. Physicam is an open source OpenGL C++ library, which provides physically based camera rendering and parameters. It is based on OpenGL and designed to be used as either static library or dynamic library and can be integrated in existing applications. The following features are implemented: Physically based sensor and focal length calculation Autoexposure Manual exposure Lense distortion Bloom (influenced by ISO, Shutter Speed, Sensor type etc.) Bokeh (influenced by Aperture, Sensor type and focal length) Tonemapping You can find the repository at https://github.com/0x2A/physicam I would be happy about feedback, suggestions or contributions.
  21. Hello everyone,We're trying to create a new open-source app distribution platform (named Spheris), and are really interested in your thoughts and perhaps even collabs.Spheris is built on top of the idea of decentralization, which makes a lot of cool things possible:No registration and transaction fees, no technical restrictions, optional anonymity, no need for banks or credit card companies, sell/buy with Spheris tokens which you will then be able to exchange for other currencies such as ETH or BTC to be able to buy a lot of other different things. One of the interesting things to note is that once your app is on the blockchain, it's there for good. Nobody will be able to remove it (except for yourself) because of the decentralized nature of the platform. For example, issues like Legalities for Game Companies and Minors which was posted on here not long ago are essentially non-issues on Spheris.We are in the early process of gathering valuable feedback from devs, and see if this is a platform that devs would like to be on. Naturally, we think that indie devs can greatly benefit from publishing on such a platform.You can have a look at https://spheris.io for more information about the project.Your questions and feedback are much appreciated,Thanks!
  22. Finally we published the video with all new new outstanding features of the upcoming Godot 3.0! Godot Engine is a feature-packed, cross-platform game engine to create 2D and 3D games from a unified interface. It is developed as open source (MIT license) by a community of devoted developers. You can support us on Patreon!
  23. Hi, i wanted to present you my recent project i am working on which is a platform abstraction library. This library is designed to be simple, non-bloated, can be included however you want and do not require any thirdparty libraries at all. It will simply abstract away all relevant platform specific things in a simple to use api. The main focus is game or simulation development, so you get a window and a rendering context plus Memory/IO/Threading and more. Why a single header platform abstract library these days? - There is not a single one out there, which do not require a ton of DLL´s or Libs just for the library itself. - I dont want C-Runtime linking madness anymore - Most are bloated and are far beyond abstracting the platform - Bad or no control how memory is being handled - There is no good single header platform abstraction library out there - I dont want to write platform specific code anymore, just once for each platform with a fixed set of features and thats it. - Debugging when you have issues with platform specific things is near impossible Mindset: - Its written in C++/98, so its much easier to get it compile and running on other platforms as well - There is just a single header file you have to include and thats it - Its full open source, so you can use and extend it however you want - No data hiding in the code, you have control over everything - Easy to use api - Does not directly allocate any memory at all - Uses just the built-in operating system functions/libraries and the C-Runtime library - Works well with non platform-specific libraries as well (ImGUI, Box2D, etc.) - Features can be compiled out as needed (Window, OpenGL, etc.) - I want to debug everything if i want to without any hassle - [Learning about low level operating system programming besides win32] Features: - Create/Handling a optional window - Create a optional opengl rendering context on the window - Memory allocation and deallocation - Timing operations - Threading - File/Path IO - Atomic operations - Dynamic library loading (.dll / .so) - Console out/in - Gamepad input Current state / Planned: - Its not complete at all, buts its usable and works - so feedback is very appreciated - Some API calls are weird, require more thinking or need to be simpler (fpl_ListFilesBegin, fpl_ListFilesNext, etc.) - Only x86/x64 win32 platform for now - Support for Direct2D/3D/Vulcan (Only to get it up and running) - Audio output (XAudio, ALSA) - Good useful automated testing - More Guides and Samples - More Platforms (Linux/Unix, maybe Android not sure) - More compiling out options (Some prefer the C++ standard template library or other libraries) - Moving utility functions into its own library which have nothing todo with the platform (fpl_ExtractFileName, fpl_RemoveEmptyDirectory) - Let the user allocate memory for storing platform input events as well Issues: - Will not work with any other platform abstraction libraries, because they all do magic stuff with entry points and such - so they gets in the way Source: https://github.com/f1nalspace/final_game_tech Feedback/Comments: I would like to know, what you think about, what is missing, how can i improve it, etc. All constructive non hating comments are welcome! Greetings, Final
  24. Hi! Currently I am working at materials about creating of Game Editor. This materials entirely focused on how to create Game Editor from scratch. Material consist from several steps - each step add some feature set to base code. Now material contain only source code. Articles will be ready soon. Repository of material located at - https://github.com/ENgineE777/EditorSteps. I hope that this material will be useful for anyone who want to create own game engine. P.S. Code depends from https://github.com/ENgineE777/EUI
  25. Hi! Currently I am working at materials about creating Cross-Platform Render System. This materials entirely focused on architecture of Render System and how to create it from scratch. Material consist from several steps - each step add some feature set to base code. Now material contain only source code. Articles will be ready soon. Repository of material located at - https://github.com/ENgineE777/RS_Steps. I hope that this material will be useful for anyone who want to create own game engine.
  • Advertisement