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  1. I always liked playing both Mario Kart (the most was on DS) and Crash Team Racing. There's just something fascinating with the mechanics of the game. I could play it endlessly, despite a small number of different circuits. Actually I like racers in general. Two years ago I made a racer looking like Outrun, which is another type of game which I loved as a child (at a time where games didn't yet have a defined standard, so it was OK to just play to hit the road and explore environments, without princess to save, big boss or other deadly stake). Link: https://itunes.apple.com/us/app/highway-runners/id964932741?mt=8 But still, back to Crash Team Racing, I always wanted to make my own clone for fun, and I gave up due to lacking physics knowledge (and free time). This remained a dream though, and this time I committed to it harder, and learned, fiddled with every concept until I grasped it. It started with an inspiring video about Space Dust Racing. I think that's the one mentioned everywhere when it comes to developing an arcade racer. I think I kinda knew that it was lacking a lot of concepts that I'd eventually have to fiddle with, but many people were saying that the theory was alright, so I started. I also created a topic, which I'll now turn to a blog: Anyway as with many things the very hard part was the beginning. It's amazing when I think about how at first I was unsure about everything. About how I had to swallow my ego and realize that I wasn't able to implement a simple spring correctly, or to understand the true implications. Well I can say that I still don't truly understand everything, but it's enough to get what my car does and make it do what I want so so this blog may just start with a common and sweet "Believe in yourself" claim I hope to develop it into a fully playable game (homebrew quality though), focusing on the mechanics, and detail here some specific algorithmic areas. I'm not sure yet of the final form, maybe I'll want to get as close to the CTR as possible. Maybe I'll go for something else and think about special challenges that I could bring to the table. Here's how it looks for now Not playable demo yet, but feel free to leave your impressions, suggestions, and anything that you'd like to see in such a project CarGame-v2.mp4
  2. Hi I am trying to create simplistic model for boats floating in water in Unity using PhysX but i am not understanding how to get it work properly. I use a single rigid body with a centre of mass as the red dot. Its below the ship's mesh as i read having a lower centre of mass made it more stable. Though i cannot get it to be stable anyway. Each green sphere is a buoyancy force calculation which has this code, and it applies the force upwards at the spheres position: _volumeUnderPlane = VolumeBelowPlane(); if (_volumeUnderPlane > 0) { // P = 1027 (approx density of water at sea level) var force = -_volumeUnderPlane * Physics.gravity * P; _parentRB.AddForceAtPosition(force, transform.position,ForceMode.Force); } Where Volume below the plane is calculated as: private float VolumeBelowPlane() { //water level is always 0 for now //math based on https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Spherical_cap var dist = -transform.position.y + _radius; dist = Mathf.Clamp(dist, 0, 2 * _radius); var dist2 = dist * dist; var frac = Mathf.PI * dist2 / 3f; var volume = 3 * _radius * frac - frac * dist; return volume; } But the result is totally unstable, this is how it looks with a lowish mass: https://i.imgur.com/LLoVzP5.gif With a high mass it looks like this: https://i.imgur.com/WNrO33z.gif I am trying to replicate how assassins creed does it, they used spheres to approximate the buoyancy without it being too computationally heavy, yet they didn't go into any details on how they did the math for it but they did post this image of it: https://www.fxguide.com/wp-content/uploads/2012/12/immerse_spheres.jpg Am i doing any thing wrong with my math here? I don't know why its so unstable for me.
  3. Breakable object physics Let's talk about physics in the game. We will introduce breakable glass, door and wall to the game to make things not only more alive but also give you more choice about your path to reach each level goal. A building is locked down ? Maybe you just jump through a window to get in ! A door is lock and you haven't found the key ? Maybe you just blow that thing out of your way ! There's no exit ? Well crank your energy up and destroy that wall ! This is the kind of choice you will be able to do as long as you live with the consequence of making a lot of noise and attracting more attention to you and potentially increasing your awareness level. Remember that your global awareness is what make your next level harder and harder. Physics will allow for more interactive game play and better replay-ability. Let be honest to, when a game require you to keep a certain level of stealth, you will eventually want to go destroy everything and play careless so why not make this fun ! Frag, IEM and Gravity bomb The player, depending on the active character, will have access to a limited amount of grenade. You get a sneek peak about it in the video below. Frag grenade will allow you to destroy glass, door and wall too. 1 character have access to frag, another one have electromagnetic device that will shut down most electronic device and the last one will have a devastating black-hole type of grenade that will serve as a way to grab item at a remote distance or to simply make things vanish in another dimension ! More to come on those soon ! C# Break in parts Our script rely on unity internal physic engine, which is quite good. Physics can become very CPU intensive so a lot of testing will be required to ensure smooth gameplay. I don't intend to go to far away into destruction. This is not a procedural "red faction" destruction system ! So destruction will happen, but in a limited amount of location. Destroying everything to get through is NOT an option. That said, i'm happy with the script performance and how it work. Magnitude of an impact For of all, the script take into account the magnitude of a hit. If the hit is too weak, the object won't break. Each object have their own breaking point which me require to walk into, run into, shoot at it, trow a grenade or use a special ability. Parts physics Once an object is broken, it fracture into multiple parts. The glass in the example video is make of 160 rigidbodies and it still perform well. Each part take into consideration their surrounding. Depending on how many piece stick together, the script determine if the piece can hold in place. The system also check for "framed" part. For a window, the framed parts are the object around the edge that would be hold in place by its frame, for a door it would be the part connected to the hinge. Those part don't fall by them self since they are hold in place by another object. Those part need to be hit again to fall and each sets of broken part need to be connected, within a certain range, to a framed part to be considered structurally stable. Basically that mean that a broken part cannot float in the air if it's not link to enough pieces and that a large glass would break realistically even if you hit limited area because the weight and size of the part would make them fall in real life. Then again, this is not a fracture simulator and we can't go too far into reality. It remain a game, so the main goal is to have fun with the system and to have smooth gameplay. The focus is about the gameplay feature or having more choice, more path and more replayability. Explosion shock-wave ! Each explosion in the game come with a shock-wave effect. The shock-wave, in my own unscientific terms, is the air getting compressed and the explosion expanding over time. That mean that an object closer to an explosion will get hit faster than an object located further. On top of that, we take into consideration the distance between the explosion and the object to determine the amount of force received by the affected object. Obstruction is also considered, if something explode and there is object between you and the explosion, you will receive less damage. The shock-wave introduce a very important time factor to the game-play. Making thing explode at a distance and have a split second to get out of the way may be a life saver for you or the AI. See and be seen The video showcase a turret being able to see you through glass and it shoot at the player destroying the glass. This behavior will of course be extended to AI but be aware that militarised zone or city will benefit from upgraded unit that may have heat sensor and a turret may just decide to kill you through a wall or a door if you are not cautious enough ! Soldier may also be equiped with those special google. The game AI have nightvision and heat sensor to track you down. More to come on that in a futur post. Let me know what you think about the feature or share your though about current game that use physics such as RB6 ?
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