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Found 7 results

  1. While making a roguelike game, procedural generation have to be quick and yet intriguing enough for the generated level to be fun to just pick up and play. There are many ways to generate and laying out procedurally generated rooms. In The Binding Of Isaac, for example, you have many different types of regular room presets. The generator just picks a preset based on things like room placement and size. Because those rooms are always of fixed size, this is a nice compromise. By having handmade presets the generated level is somewhat believable (i.e. there are no gaps or obstacles below a room door or secret room and whatnot). Another example would be Nuclear Throne. The game takes a different approach to procedural generation by keeping it relatively simple. Because it's not room-based like The Binding Of Isaac, there are more things like caves and large open area. The gameplay also plays into this, as the player needs to eliminate every enemy to spawn a portal to the next level. Because my game is somehow more inspired by The Binding of Isaac, the right way to procedurally generate rooms would be to use presets, and this is how I make special rooms. However, there's a big difference between The Binding Of Isaac and my game: my regular rooms aren't always the same size. This means that rather than having presets of regular rooms as well as special rooms I need something more flexible and, most importantly, dynamic.. The anatomy of a Room In my game, as I've said in a previous post, levels are big two-dimensional arrays from which the level geometry is generated. Every room of a level is made using a BSP tree. I won't go in details much on how rooms are generated, but in essence, we create a grid from which we trace a path between two rooms and sparsely attach bonus rooms along the way. Because I already have rooms sizes and whatnot with that level generation, I could reuse the same idea for room layouts. Within rooms, I've also set special anchor points from which props (or more precisely, prop formations, more on that later...) could be generated. Basic Layouts The idea here is to have room layout presets. Within those, presets are an array of prop formations, and each of these formations is linked to a specific anchor point. A formation has a two-dimensional boolean array that indicates whenever or not there should be a prop here. Let's take, for example, a diamond array: The dimension of the array depends on its rooms' dimensions. Here's how it's done: \( size = \left \lceil \frac{2(max(RoomSize_{x},RoomSize_{y}))) }{ 3 } \right \rceil\) In order to change the array's content we actually use common image manipulation algorithms... Bresenham's Line Algorithm The first used algorithm is the Bresenham's Line Algorithm. Its purpose is to simply render a line describe by two bitmap points onto a raster image. To put it simply, we get the deviation (delta, or "d" for short) in both X and Y of each point of the described line and compare both of them. Depending on the biggest, we simply incremate the point on that axis and colour it in. Here's the implementation: public void TraceLine(Vector2Int p0, Vector2Int p1) { int dx = Mathf.Abs(p1.x - p0.x), sx = p0.x < p1.x ? 1 : -1; int dy = Mathf.Abs(p1.y - p0.y), sy = p0.y < p1.y ? 1 : -1; int err = (dx > dy ? dx : -dy) / 2, e2; while (true) { m_propArray[p0.x][p0.y] = true; if (p0.x == p1.x && p0.y == p1.y) { break; } e2 = err; if (e2 > -dx) { err -= dy; p0.x += sx; } if (e2 < dy) { err += dx; p0.y += sy; } } } Midpoint Circle Algorithm The midpoint circle algorithm is an algorithm used to render a circle onto an image. The idea is somehow similar to Bresenham's Line Algorithm, but rather than drawing a line we draw a circle. To do this we also need, for simplicity sakes, to divide the circle into 8 pieces, called octants. We can do this because circles are always symmetric. (It's also a nice way to unroll loops) Here's the implementation: private void TraceCircle(Vector2Int center, int r, AbstractPropFormation formation) { int d = (5 - r * 4) / 4; int x = 0; int y = r; do { // ensure index is in range before setting (depends on your image implementation) // in this case we check if the pixel location is within the bounds of the image before setting the pixel if (IsValidPoint(center + new Vector2Int(x,y)) { formation.m_propArray[center.x + x][center.y + y] = true; } if (IsValidPoint(center + new Vector2Int(x,-y)) { formation.m_propArray[center.x + x][center.y - y] = true; } if (IsValidPoint(center + new Vector2Int(-x,y)) { formation.m_propArray[center.x - x][center.y + y] = true; } if (IsValidPoint(center + new Vector2Int(-x,-y)) { formation.m_propArray[center.x - x][center.y - y] = true; } if (IsValidPoint(center + new Vector2Int(y,x)) { formation.m_propArray[center.x + y][center.y + x] = true; } if (IsValidPoint(center + new Vector2Int(y,-x)) { formation.m_propArray[center.x + y][center.y - x] = true; } if (IsValidPoint(center + new Vector2Int(-y,x)) { formation.m_propArray[center.x - y][center.y + x] = true; } if (IsValidPoint(center + new Vector2Int(-y,-x)) { formation.m_propArray[center.x - y][center.y - x] = true; } if (d < 0) { d += 2 * x + 1; } else { d += 2 * (x - y) + 1; y--; } x++; } while (x <= y); } Flood Fill Algorithm This is quite a classic, but it's still useful nevertheless. The idea is to progressively fill a section of an image with a specific colour while The implementation is using a coordinate queue rather than recursion for optimization sakes. We also try to fill the image using west-east orientation. Basically, we fill the westmost pixel first, eastmost second and finally go north-south. Here's the implementation: public void Fill(Vector2Int point) { Queue<Vector2Int> q = new Queue<Vector2Int>(); q.Enqueue(point); while (q.Count > 0) { Vector2Int currentPoint = q.Dequeue(); if (!m_propArray[currentPoint.x][currentPoint.y]) { Vector2Int westPoint = currentPoint, eastPoint = new Vector2Int(currentPoint.x + 1, currentPoint.y); while ((westPoint.x >= 0) && !m_propArray[westPoint.x][westPoint.y]) { m_propArray[westPoint.x][westPoint.y] = true; if ((westPoint.y > 0) && !m_propArray[westPoint.x][westPoint.y - 1]) { q.Enqueue(new Vector2Int(westPoint.x, westPoint.y - 1)); } if ((westPoint.y < m_propArray[westPoint.x].Length - 1) && !m_propArray[westPoint.x][westPoint.y + 1]) { q.Enqueue(new Vector2Int(westPoint.x, westPoint.y + 1)); } westPoint.x--; } while ((eastPoint.x <= m_propArray.Length - 1) && !m_propArray[eastPoint.x][eastPoint.y]) { m_propArray[eastPoint.x][eastPoint.y] = true; if ((eastPoint.y > 0) && !m_propArray[eastPoint.x][eastPoint.y - 1]) { q.Enqueue(new Vector2Int(eastPoint.x, eastPoint.y - 1)); } if ((eastPoint.y < m_propArray[eastPoint.x].Length - 1) && !m_propArray[eastPoint.x][eastPoint.y + 1]) { q.Enqueue(new Vector2Int(eastPoint.x, eastPoint.y + 1)); } eastPoint.x++; } } } } Formation Shapes Each formation also has a specific shape. These shapes simply define the content of the formation array. We can build these shapes using the previously mentioned algorithms. There are 9 different types of shapes as of now. Vertical line A simple vertical line of a width of one Horizontal line A simple horizontal line of a width of one Diamond A rather nice diamond shape, especially pretty in corners Circle The circle is rendered using the Midpoint circle algorithm. Especially pretty in the center of rooms Cross A simple cross shape, i.e a vertical and horizontal line align at the center. X Shape An "X" shaped cross, i.e two perpendicular diagonal lines align at the center. Triangle An Isocele triangle. Square A solid block. Every cell of the formation is essentially true. Checkers A nice variation of the square shape. Every other cell is false. There might be more types of shapes as time goes by, but it's about it for now. Placing props Once the array is set, we simply need to place the actual props in the room. Each formation is of an actual type, i.e. rocks, ferns, etc. (For simplicity sakes, let's say that every prop is a 1x1x1m cube. This would simplify future steps.) In order to find their position, we simply align the array's center to the formations' specified anchor point. For each prop formation, we then instantiate props for each true cells while checking whenever or not the prop would be outside its room. Afterwards, we do a precise position check to make sure no props are either partially or fully outside a room. Finally, we make sure every room connections aren't obstructed with props. And voilà, we have a nicely decorated room In Game Screenshots Here's a couple of screenshots of what it looks like in-game
  2. I've started making some props for a chemistry lab recently, but I found out it would be smart to ask some questions here before proceeding since I'm a beginner so I don't have to redo too much. Any help I can get would be really appreciated. I've tried looking for triangle count and texture sizes for various props in current gen games, but find it hard to find specs other than for characters. I'm not making these for use in games myself, but as I get better I would be interested to start sell on markets like Unreal and Unity so I have to make sure the props fits the general performance requirements. Magnetic stirrer: Given the information given below, do you think the triangle count and texture size is acceptable Size: 15x25x12 cm 1024x1024 texture size. Should I add similar/mirrored UV's that can't be seen simultaneously on top of each other to preserve UV space? Do I need extra UV maps for light map generation if I do that? LOD0 = 2600 tris LOD1 = 1400 tris LOD2 = 700 tris LOD3 = 300 tris Approximate tris counts! In the picture below of the LOD3 mesh I have a little problem. To get nice normal bakes I had to add UV seams add every sharp edge. When I then start to remove geometry to make lower LODs it sometimes happens that some of the mesh is removed from the UV map. As you can see here this leads to no white border around the orange color for this mesh. Any nice tricks here, or is this acceptable considering the distance will be pretty large? Analytical balance: Triangle count of LOD0 (wireframe) = 2000 The part I've marked with a red circle in the second picture below is not connected to the main body of the balance since I would need a lot of extra triangles to connect it. The plane below it will obviously not be rendered and doesn't need UV space, but I wonder what the cheapest solution to "remove" this area without too much extra geometry? This got a bit much, sorry for that. If some of it got cleared up I would be very glad.
  3. i'm beginner at game development and i started to design some levels and environments but should i download my assets or learn how to create them like 3D modeling ,texturing etc if i want to have a job in the industry as a level designer ?
  4. Ben3d

    Low-poly ornamental shield

    My new contribution. I hope you will like it. Details here.
  5. Ben3d

    Low-poly Neo Gothic Fireplace

    • Albedo map 1024 px, • Tangent normal map 1024 px, • Specular map 1024 px, • Glossiness map 1024 px.• Fireplace mesh : 276 tris • Grate : 976 tris Details here.
  6. Ben3d

    Unfortunate twist of events

    The same on different plateforms: Deviant art Twitter

    © Benoit Flaig

  7. Stranger1988

    Low poly Magnum .357

    Hey. Just finished low poly pistol. What do you think about it? 3700 tr ready for unreal , unity or any other engine This model available on cgtrader https://www.cgtrader.com/3d-models/military/gun/357-magnum-pistol
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