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Found 11 results

  1. Instead of one big ugly image, this time I'll give you lots of smaller ugly ones. I added a new main branch to the old Mind Map, this one describes how the actual servers will be configured. This is a general overview of course, I'm building for a single (Physical/Virtual) server installation first then I'll add in data replication and failover capabilities later. A new server type was added as well, the Social Server, it does some fairly obvious types of things.. After looking at the big picture and, well spending some time painting it first, I started to see some ways to optimize and organize things better. For example I've completely moved the main "Player Attitude Network Relay" or Position/Attitude Reflector (the thing that makes network player character coordinates propagate to other player clients on the internet..blah!). It was going to just live in the Avatar Server, but that handles Authentication and quite a few other very crucial game play roles.. So now it lives where it makes way more sense, at the point in the system where its data is needed the most. In the Action Server, this server handles all of the fast action related decision making. The Avatar Server still handles propagating the player character's Data(features, wardrobe,etc), just not the deluge of player movement data. This makes it far easier to design this part of the system to scale, which is important because this is one of the critical points for concerns of scale. As long as EVERY Action Server maintains accurate positional buffers, then it doesn't matter WHICH Action Server processes the client's messages. Keeping the positional buffers in sync will probably require the addition of high speed intermediary "Data Base" Servers and all that jazz. I ramble, but I'm making some good progress towards a cohesive plan, and it's making everything start to feel like it's coming together. The hacknplan data entry is still much in progress, I've started adding tasks to keep myself on track with adding data to it.. haha, sounds redundant but it's helping me stay on track. Here's the Game Design Model I was talking about in my last thread, I'm enjoying the simplicity of it all. It's essentially just the tree structured view of my Mind Map, so it's pretty easy to keep these two tools in sync. I add child items where necessary and attach tasks to whatever branch/child I want. The main "Board" view is just a standard KanBan style system, but it's simple and easy to work with, it integrates well with the Game Design Model and seems to be fairly stable. Here I'll attach the whole of the latest Mind Map revision, for the curious and/or gluttons of punishment. I'm happy with my progress so far. Slowly approaching the Maintenance point. Then the full code sprint starts again. I'm still coding, so I don't lose my place, just not at the pace I would like with all the admin work I've given myself. Anyhow, enough talking about stuff I've already done, I've got stuff to do!
  2. k0fe

    Development Stages

    As you can see on the image below I’ve planned the whole development process. Sure, everything won’t go as planned but at least I know where I’m heading to. This helps me stay motivated and be more specific while working on the game itself. Right now I’m at the very first stage - design stage. Almost a year behind!
  3. I'm mostly following AGILE, but it's the only software development methodology I know. Do we know what methodologies are used by the AAA guys like EA and Ubisoft? Which ones are popular among indie devs?
  4. soul_requiem

    Why I'm making this game?

    After 2 and a half years learning, practicing and making small games, as a team we decided to make the next step and make a commercial game. We know that we have a lot to learn yet, so for this game we're going to focus on the abilities we already have. This way the development will be faster and don't will be delayed for getting stuck in code or sprites too hard to make. We have more experience making platformer games, so we're going for that direction, also we think it's easier for making sprites, coding, and animation. if you're interested check the first game we released as a team! Gamejolt: https://gamejolt.com/games/umbral/153048 Itch.io : https://rengy.itch.io/umbral Fist sprites for Cow vs the Pig Empire
  5. Release feels so close. It's like the pieces are all in my lap and I just have to follow the instructions to put them together. The final version of Battle Gem Ponies is so clear in my head now that I'm fanboying over it sometimes. In the last 7 days I charted out exactly how all 360 battle moves will look, I recreated every menu, rebalanced the battle system, came up with catchier names for things, sorted out details for a DLC & multiplatform launch plan, and closely studied just about everything that makes the games that inspired this one so great. To keep track of things I made a week-by-week breakdown of the rest of BGP's development. Counting down what's left to do to get the game to a launchable state. If you wanna find out what the Yotes Games Wednesday Milestones are, look at the list on this week's new devblog!
  6. Happy Thursday! Looking for some recommendations for apps that help plan/organize classes and methods for a project (something like xmind but for programming). Also Looking for good app beyond GitHub for project coordination. Thanks in advance :3 ~Wolf
  7. GameDev2017

    Sprint 6 is ready for pick-up.

    Sprint 6 is out. The #WORDSproductions team set the following goals: Create and publish a video of Charly Men introducing the game BIZARRE to potential players. (in German) Create a concept art of world outside Clearwaters appartement windows. Create the main-character, Charly Clearwater, in 3D. Continue working at the first game scene, Clearwaters appartement, i.e. create furniture in 3D and texture them. So, let's start today!
  8. Morning all. For the last many years my indie software developments have been using an online tool called FengOffice to do development management. It's a power collaboration tool that supports multiple concurrent developments, file sharing, discussion, milestones, tasks and most importantly (for me) hourly tracking. My webhosts have recently started throttling the PHP memory and apparantly Feng is a huge PHP hog. I can change webhosts obviously but when I looked at the CPU/memory usage of Feng it was pretty heavy. Does anyone have online collaboration tools/suites they use or would recommend? My requirements below: Must Have: - Task scheduling - Time tracking by task/user - Note sharing/discussion - User access controls for various areas of the project (IE server guys dont need to see modelling guys tasks and progress.) Nice to have: - File Sharing - Multiple project management - Milestones Thanks in advance! Mark
  9. The Toronto Game Jam is opening for registration later this year. I'm hoping to participate again since it's been a great experience every time. As of last year myself and a friend have participated in the Toronto Game Jam three times. The event, also known as TOJam, has developers come together at George Brown College for three days of manic development of crazy game ideas. Participating in a jam can be overwhelming but also rewarding and fun as hell. Over the last few events I've had things go right and things go wrong. Here are some tips to help avoid some of the worse pitfalls that you can hit during a jam. Tip 1: Know what you're going to make in advance At TOJam you have from Friday at 10:00AM until Sunday at 6:00PM to create your game. While you don't need things to be set in stone you should know that you're making a puzzle game and if will be based on sliding tiles or stacking blocks. If you don't know what you want to make then you'll be using up your time figuring out what to do instead of doing it. The week before the game jam we take our one or two paragraph "elevator pitch" and write a simple list of what needs to exist to fulfill that pitch. We then refine that list into a detailed set of tasks we want to complete on each day of the jam. With the list we can grab work as it's ready and keep dead time minimal. Tip 2: Know what features you can drop Murphy's law always strikes. Something goes wrong and suddenly the deadline is looming. When figuring out what to do for the game you should have some idea of what features you can drop without ruining it. Generally this list will be very short but it's always handy to have if you fall behind schedule. Making a list of optional features is also a good gut-check on whether you've got a realistic schedule. If the list is long then your project is probably too large. A schedule that feels like it has too little work on each day is better than one with too much. You can always add work and scope to a project while you're working on it. It's much harder to cut scope down when you're running out of time. Tip 3: Balance your workload between team members If you're jamming solo you don't have to worry about this. If not it's critical that everyone has something to do. One trick is to have broad but shallow task trees. If C depends on B which depends on A then they can only be done by one person. Sure you could work on A then your partner can work on B but you can't work on C while your partner works on B. A way of fixing this is adjusting your design so B and C depend on A but not on each other. From a coding perspective using interfaces and loose coupling helps a lot. In our latest jam, TOJam 12, we had a number of lethal hazards which could be activated by a button. In the bad case character death would depend on development of some arbitrary hazard which would depend on implementing the button to activate it. To avoid this we set up the button with two observable events, OnPressed and OnReleased and gave the player character a "Killed" method. By having a simple interface everything that was activated by the button could be developed independently. By having the "Killed" method player death could be written independently from any specific way of killing the player. Another trick is to group your tasks into distinct streams. During the start of TOJam 12 I developed the base skeleton of the game while my team mate whiteboxed levels. The only dependency here was that I needed at least one level to load to start the game which was done well before I needed it. Later on I worked on handling player death while my teammate composed the title theme song for the game. Tip 4: Have a library of game creation tools in advance When jamming it's important to always be working on the game you want to make. The last thing you should be doing during a game jam is building a tile map editor. In TOJam 11 we lost about four hours to writing input handling code for a twin stick shooter. That took away time from more important tasks like generating bullet patterns, spawning enemies and so on. Tip 5: Minimize the number of variables the game's design I'm not a professional game designer so I'm not sure if "variable" is the right word. What I refer to is a thing that can be changed to alter the feel and balance of a game. The speed of a character, enemy hit points, number of enemies, how often they shoot, how often you shoot and so on. All of these variables add complexity to the process of making a game "feel" the way it should. Having lots of low hitpoint enemies could make you feel powerful. Having a few high hitpoint enemies would feel quite different. Having lots of high hitpoint enemies could make the game feel dangerous, scary or simply unfair. In all these cases I'm only changing two variables, the number of enemies and their hitpoints. At TOJam 11 we produced a twin stick shooter called MANT: The Man Ant. The twist is that the bullet patterns would be generated procedurally. This also was the biggest headache. Pattern generation worked but it was extremely unbalanced. Sometimes patterns would be pathetically easy. Sometimes the game would produce enormous unavoidable walls of gigantic bullets. We burned up at least half a day trying to get a consistent and fun difficulty curve but still had huge differences between sessions. The game was a "finished" working product but it wasn't very fun. Our next project was a puzzle platformer built around using dead bodies left behind when your character dies to reach different goals. Variables are generally level specific and mostly independent. Things like how quickly a door should close or how often a gun should fire. Tweaking still took around half a day but we stopped tweaking because we were done rather than being out of time. ToJam Specific Extra If you're driving from another city don't forget to take traffic into account. The 401 and Gardiner Expressway are infamous for a reason. Related Links Toronto Game Jam website Our TOJam 11 project (not a great game in my opinion) Our TOJam 12 project (you can find more details on how the jam went in the development log)
  10. Enrique Navarro

    Work Team

    We want, Designers, Software Developers, Artists, Narrators etc... For a video game project. Contact and go to see what we can do. Thanks
  11. I want to ask a question about how much time it normally takes to make large games. I am doing a proposal assignment and wanted some sources for how much time it would normally take for larger games to be developed and released. I just thought I could ask around here while doing google searches elsewhere. Sources I found so far: https://kotaku.com/how-much-does-it-cost-to-make-a-big-video-game-1501413649 https://www.economist.com/blogs/economist-explains/2014/09/economist-explains-15
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