Advertisement Jump to content
  • Advertisement

Search the Community

Showing results for tags 'Sprites'.



More search options

  • Search By Tags

    Type tags separated by commas.
  • Search By Author

Content Type


Categories

  • Audio
    • Music and Sound FX
  • Business
    • Business and Law
    • Career Development
    • Production and Management
  • Game Design
    • Game Design and Theory
    • Writing for Games
    • UX for Games
  • Industry
    • Interviews
    • Event Coverage
  • Programming
    • Artificial Intelligence
    • General and Gameplay Programming
    • Graphics and GPU Programming
    • Engines and Middleware
    • Math and Physics
    • Networking and Multiplayer
  • Visual Arts
  • Archive

Categories

  • Audio
  • Visual Arts
  • Programming
  • Writing

Categories

  • Game Dev Loadout
  • Game Dev Unchained

Categories

  • Game Developers Conference
    • GDC 2017
    • GDC 2018
  • Power-Up Digital Games Conference
    • PDGC I: Words of Wisdom
    • PDGC II: The Devs Strike Back
    • PDGC III: Syntax Error

Forums

  • Audio
    • Music and Sound FX
  • Business
    • Games Career Development
    • Production and Management
    • Games Business and Law
  • Game Design
    • Game Design and Theory
    • Writing for Games
  • Programming
    • Artificial Intelligence
    • Engines and Middleware
    • General and Gameplay Programming
    • Graphics and GPU Programming
    • Math and Physics
    • Networking and Multiplayer
  • Visual Arts
    • 2D and 3D Art
    • Critique and Feedback
  • Community
    • GameDev Challenges
    • GDNet+ Member Forum
    • GDNet Lounge
    • GDNet Comments, Suggestions, and Ideas
    • Coding Horrors
    • Your Announcements
    • Hobby Project Classifieds
    • Indie Showcase
    • Article Writing
  • Affiliates
    • NeHe Productions
    • AngelCode
  • Topical
    • Virtual and Augmented Reality
    • News
  • Workshops
    • C# Workshop
    • CPP Workshop
    • Freehand Drawing Workshop
    • Hands-On Interactive Game Development
    • SICP Workshop
    • XNA 4.0 Workshop
  • Archive
    • Topical
    • Affiliates
    • Contests
    • Technical
  • GameDev Challenges's Topics
  • For Beginners's Forum
  • Unreal Engine Users's Unreal Engine Group Forum

Calendars

  • Community Calendar
  • Games Industry Events
  • Game Jams
  • GameDev Challenges's Schedule

Blogs

There are no results to display.

There are no results to display.

Product Groups

  • Advertisements
  • GameDev Gear

Find results in...

Find results that contain...


Date Created

  • Start

    End


Last Updated

  • Start

    End


Filter by number of...

Joined

  • Start

    End


Group


About Me


Website


Role


Twitter


Github


Twitch


Steam

Found 54 results

  1. Simple problem compared to what is usually posted around here, but I'm trying to draw a rotated textured rectangle in my sprite batch: if(sprt->tex != tex) { flush(); sprt->tex = tex; } glm::vec2 oldHsize = hsize; hsize.x = oldHsize.x * cos(angle) - oldHsize.y * sin(angle); hsize.y = oldHsize.x * sin(angle) + oldHsize.y * cos(angle); data.push_back({{pos.x - hsize.x, pos.y - hsize.y}, {0, 1}}); data.push_back({{pos.x + hsize.x, pos.y - hsize.y}, {1, 1}}); data.push_back({{pos.x - hsize.x, pos.y + hsize.y}, {0, 0}}); data.push_back({{pos.x + hsize.x, pos.y - hsize.y}, {1, 1}}); data.push_back({{pos.x - hsize.x, pos.y + hsize.y}, {0, 0}}); data.push_back({{pos.x + hsize.x, pos.y + hsize.y}, {1, 0}}); } hsize is half the size of the sprite being drawn. But it seems to draw it completely incorrectly. If I slowly increase the value of angle, here's what it looks like (in the attachments). 2019-01-01_18-07-35.mp4
  2. Let's say I have a sprite which is a 2D house. I want to render that house AND I want multiple polygons to form colliders around the walls. The way I thought I would do this is: 1. Create a polygon on a 2D modeling software and export the vertexes. 2. Parse the vertexes in my code. 3. Create a collider shape that joins all those vertexes. The problem is I can't figure out a simple way to do what step 1 requires. Maybe my thinking is wrong, but what I was aiming at was a way to draw lines and vertexes with a background image support and then export it to a file. What to do?
  3. I am designing a very simple 2d tilemap engine with HTML5 canvas and Javascript. I have two for loops to run through map coordinates and then draw to canvas a tile based on what the said coordinate value is. While doing this, I also need to able to assign an incrmenting var/class/type or whatever with dynamic parameters such as that tile's x, y, and number values. Something like the following pseudo theory: for loop ++ , for loop++ counter++ sprite[counter]{ x=someNum; y=someNum; value=someVal; } Thanks for any help! Jscript_GameTest.html
  4. jbadams

    Free art assets

    The older version of this topic is getting quite dated, with some broken links and notable omissions, so after 8 years it's high time for an update. This is a list of free graphics for games but aims to avoid sprites ripped from existing games in favour of ones that may be legally used in your work. Please feel free to submit your own suggestions, but note that any off-topic posts and all spam may be removed from this topic. Be sure to check the licensing terms before using any of the linked graphics. Free Airplane Sprite Pack A free .zip package right here on GameDev.net containing various aircraft from different (mostly side or top down) angles. Includes fighter jets, bombers and cargo planes. Provided by our very own (but recently inactive) @Prinz Eugn (Mark Simpson). Free for any use with attribution to the author. Kenney Assets A huge collection of freely available assets (both 2d and 3d) for many different styles of games, available under CC0 1.0 Universal licensing terms. In addition to the free assets, Kenney's work is supported by the sale of cheaply available asset packs which you'll find linked at the top of the page, and the fantastic Asset Forge which allows the easy creation of customised game assets. SpriteLib GPL A free .zip package of 2d games sprites by Ari Feldman, now available under a Common Public License Version 1.0. Unfortunately, the original website is no longer online, the source website is back online HERE, but the sprite package is attached to this post for you to download: spritelib_gpl.zip Contains sprites for a platform game, Pong/Breakout/Arkanoid style games, overhead shooter in the style of 1943, and a maze combat game in the style of Tank Force. Lost Garden Freely provided graphics from Daniel Cook of Lost Garden & Spry Fox, under licensing terms explained on this page. Danc's Miraculously Flexible Game Prototyping Tiles Danc's Miraculously Flexible Game Prototyping Graphics for Small Worlds 250 free hand-drawn textures Tyrian ships and tiles Tiles for Zelda-like RPG Complete set of 8-bit Sinistar clone graphics Unreleased RTS Postmortem: 'Hard Vacuum' (graphics near end of post) In addition to the above, Daniel also has a couple of 'Game Prototyping Challenges' where he provides the basic outline of a game design and challenges people to implement and iterate on the design to hopefully create a fun game. A couple of these challenges come with freely provided graphics, although in this case the assets are intended for use if undertaking the challenge (a fantastic learning exercise!) in question rather than for general use: Prototyping Challenge: Play With Your Peas Prototyping Challenge: Fishing Girl Glitch - Public Domain Art (and code) All assets from a defunct web-based MMO game, made freely available under CC0 1.0 Universal licensing terms. Get it HERE. Most of the graphics are available in .fla and .swf formats. Quaternius Quaternius offers a large range of basic low-poly models with CC0 licensing. You can also support his efforts by purchasing all of his sets in a single file for $1. OpenGameArt.org OpenGameArt have a huge collection of different art, constantly added to by new and existing contributors. Quality and style vary, but there is some really good material available if you're willing to spend some time looking. Note that licensing terms vary, so be sure to check each item's license before use. Game-Icons.net At the time of writing, Game-Icons.net offers 3044 free icons in SVG and PNG formats with CC BY 3.0 licensing (which requires attribution). The built in editor on the site will allow you to alter the icon size and apply some simple properties (such as background type and colour). AI War 2.0 graphics library Graphics from the space RTS game AI War: Fleet Command. Free for use by indie developers. Get it HERE. Reiner's Tilesets 2d and 3d graphics (use the menu at the top of the site to view categories) available under these licensing terms. MakeHuman MakeHuman is an open source (AGPL licenced) tool for creating 3d characters. Output characters can be used under a permissive CC0 license under certain conditions. GameDev.Market There are some free assets available via the GameDev Marketplace (our very own asset store!). Looking to hire an artist for custom work? Check out our Contractors section, or advertise your project in our Game Jobs board (for paid commercial projects) or Hobby Classifieds forum (for free hobbyist projects). Looking to purchase pre-made assets? Try the GameDev Marketplace, or other asset stores such as GameDev Market (not affiliated with us!), the Unity Asset Store, the Unreal Marketplace, or others.
  5. Programmer One

    2D Android Sprite Caching

    I'm currently writing a 2D game engine from scratch for Android. The first iteration of the engine is just going to use the Android Canvas view for drawing. At some point, I want to support OpenGL ES - but not until I finish this first project (which is a very simply game based on this engine). Right now, I'm dealing with Sprites and I've encountered a design challenge that I'm not entirely sure which direction I should go. For the sprite bitmaps, I've decided to go down the sprite atlas route (as opposed to individual image files). I'm using Texture Packer and I've written a custom JSON exporter. I didn't really want to limit myself too much, so I decided I'd support sprite rotation and trimming in order to save as much space I can in the atlas. I backed off from supporting polygon trimming for now. If you're unfamiliar with Texture Packer, it's essentially a tool that will allow you to import individual sprite frames, organize them into folders and then have the application generate a sprite map and corresponding coordinate data file. This application supports trimming any blank (alpha) space around the sprite images in order to pack them closer together. It also supports rotation if it makes the image fit better. What I'm trying to figure out now is how to deal with loading the sprite image data. Currently, I'm at the point where I can deserialize the JSON map data into "Sprite Frame" objects. These objects contain information about each frame. My format allows grouping of sprite frames in order to organize frames that correspond to the same animation. In essence, the sprite frame object has: The original (untrimmed) size of the sprite image. The original position of the sprite image within it's bounding box. The rect of where the image is in the sprite atlas. A flag indicating if it had been trimmed. A flag indicating if it has been rotated (CW). This will give me all the information I need to draw the image onto the Canvas. If I didn't support all the other fancy features I want (packed rotation, trimming) and pre-transformation (i.e. mirroring a sprite so I can reuse it for things like changing the walking animation without having to pack in more sprites), then drawing the image from the sprite atlas onto the canvas would be as simple as a simple Canvas.drawBitmap([Source Bitmap], [Destination Rect], [Source Rect]). But, since the image I'd be drawing MIGHT have been rotated, trimmed or otherwise transformed, I can't just simply blit it onto the Canvas. I'd first would need to apply some transformations in order to "undo" changes that were done during packing. This means I would need to either: Slice out the child image from the sprite atlas into a new bitmap, and apply the "unpacking" transformations (i.e. rotate back, realign, etc). Apply a transformation to the Canvas itself. (I don't think I want to go down this road since I've read that transforming the Canvas tends to be rather slow). So, I'm probably left with having to create smaller bitmaps from the sprite atlas and then keep those in memory for as long as I would need them. So, for a single sprite character, I'd be looking at around 36 sprite frames (9 different animations, each with 4 frames). What I'm concerned about is memory consumption. So now I'm thinking: I should read in all the sprite bitmaps from the sprite atlas and shove them into an LRU cache. This means all the sprite image data is now in memory, all ready to go for whatever animation sequence and frame I want. Once I'm done with the atlas, I dispose of it and just work with what I have in memory. I can perform this caching when I load levels and then clear items from the cache that I no longer need. I should just keep the sprite atlas, blit directly from that onto the canvas, and get rid of the fancy packing features so that I don't have to process any transformations. The only problem with this approach is that I will also have to shelve shearing and rotation on the sprite object itself. TL;DR: Am I being overly memory conscientious or having a couple frames of sprite data in memory not a super big deal?
  6. ERASERHEAD STUDIO

    13 RONIN - DevLog #6 - Time for graphics

    In my last blog post I showcased some of the audio I’ve been working with for my upcoming game 13 RONIN, now it’s time for graphics. But first a celebration. The 4th of October is a day dedicated to the cinnamon roll here in Sweden (yes, it’s true), which we, of course, celebrate by baking, buying and eating lot’s of (you guessed it) cinnamon rolls. Since I’m a fan of the pastry myself, I happily took part in the celebration. But I also had another reason to celebrate. From October and till the end of the year I’ve reduced the number of hours I’m putting in on my day job from 40 to 32 in favor of spending more time working on 13 RONIN. Big kudos to my boss for approving this! Main character How do you go about drawing a samurai with realistic proportions when you don’t know how to draw? I started by googling images on human proportions and created a reference image I could use as background layer while drawing. In parallel to this, I watched a lot of old samurai movies and Kendo-tournaments and with still images from these kind of videos as reference I drew my character. At the beginning of this project, I intended to use silhouette-looking sprites mostly drawn in solid black. This changed over time, I had a few different ideas, but finally settled on using gray-scaled sprites with very low-saturated colors for light and dark areas. I decided on this color scheme to keep consistent with the black and white samurai movie theme. The low saturated colors are there to make the sprites stand out from the background, but also to make the visuals more interesting. With this style, I’ve found a reasonable balance between aesthetics and time spent drawing. Background In the early days of this project, I was more into ninjas than samurais and the initial idea for the game was that you as a white dressed samurai had to fight a bunch of bad, bad ninjas dressed in colorful outfits. To get started I drew a forest background. Soon I discovered that even the best of the ninja-movies weren’t that good and I found myself switching to samurai-movies and my approach to the project changed. Now I wanted to create a fighting game looking like Limbo, with black ninjas emerging from the dark. Sometime later I re-discovered my love for low-resolution pixel-art and the Limbo-aesthetics was dropped. The code-project still carries the somewhat humorous working title of the ninja-project, it’s called “Ninja in the dark”. I wanted to start drawing something basic, something I thought I had the skills for and choose to draw a building which I later on turned into a tavern. It’s yet not finished and I can’t promise it will fit into the final game, but it will be the background of the first public build. Energy and score After finishing the background I took some time to draw the graphics for player score and energy symbols. I tried a few different ideas and settled on the score written in a custom font upon a scroll-like background. For energy symbols I also tried a few different ideas before stealing the yin-yang symbols from The way of the exploding fist and turning them red. I do love that game. In-game graphics There are a lot of animations to finish before the game is playable, but this is at least a taste of what will come. Please visit www.eraserheadstudio.com for more about 13 RONIN. Happy coding! /jan.
  7. Hello friends! I've got a new blog posting for my upcoming 2D pixel-art samurai fighting game 13 RONIN. This time I'm talking about background and character drawing. Please check it out at: Happy coding! /jan.
  8. Hey, everyone, I've been teaching myself C++ for the past week, although I've been coding and tinkering with games for almost 16 years. I'm comfortable with the C++ syntax already and have been chugging along fine, but I've hit a bit of a snag. I'm using CodeBlocks 17.12, SDL 2.0.8, and SDL Image 2.0.3, and I am trying to load a PNG file in for use as a sprite. I have SDL linked perfectly fine, and have been messing around with it's commands for a couple of days with no problems. Loading BMPs, editing pixel matrices, getting user input, basic loop timing and flow, etc. Yesterday, I tried to install SDL Image, and I have the library installed to the point that CodeBlocks can pick up it's syntax and I can use auto finish on it's commands, and there are no compilation errors. The problem comes when I run my code. Through process of elimination(thanks to my in-built error checking), I have narrowed it down to this code: /*** -INITIALIZE PNG LOADING- ***/ int flags=IMG_INIT_PNG; int initted=IMG_Init(flags); if((initted&&flags) != flags) { SDL_Log("Unable to initialize image load: %s", IMG_GetError()); return EXIT_FAILURE; } /*** -LOAD IMAGES- ***/ SDL_Surface *image; SDL_RWops *rwop; rwop=SDL_RWFromFile("\media\die.png", "rb"); image=IMG_LoadPNG_RW(rwop); if(!image) { SDL_Log("Unable to initialize load image: %s", IMG_GetError()); return EXIT_FAILURE; } If I comment block all the Load Images part it runs(even with the PNG Loading part still in), but if I dont, it exits due to the error. After digging around to see what could be wrong I went to the SDL Image website to read that PNG files may need libPNG and zlib. I tried for hours to install those two libraries, but it looks like no matter which archive I download it's just full of UNIX garbage that I can't use on Windows. This, however, doesn't seem to be the path I needed to take, as through testing BMPs do the same thing(Which SDL Image says should load natively). I don't know if there is an error in my code, or if I need libPNG and zlib. I'm lost here. Help would be greatly appreciated, thanks, -Omerta
  9. I'm an animator/programmer, and my specialty is animating static images using 3D modelling software (Blender). Looking for a 2d artist who can produce NSFW images (NOT the sprites/spritesheets, just a static scene) to use in an action-RPG style of h-game. Mostly for a hobby joint-project, but It would be a good opportunity for both parties to practice their skills. Please message if you're interested or want to invite me to an already established team. Thanks!
  10. gdarchive

    Color Palettes

    Intro Due to my belief in learning through self-discovery and my ongoing creative evolution, I've long put off doing any tutorials. However, after making pixel art for over 3 years I've established many solid techniques worth laying out in a concrete fashion. While I'm excited by the prospect of helping others with my experience, I still urge artists to explore things their own way. The wonderful thing about art is the unlimited number of solutions to a problem. I offer you solutions that have worked for me and I hope they work for you, but I will be even more thrilled if you discover a better solution along the way. When it comes to pixel art, it all starts with a good color palette. Creating a custom color palette can be a very satisfying and powerful way to establish your own unique look. I'll guide you through my method as I create a new palette. But first, let's go over some basic principals. It's all about HSB I find it easiest to understand and control color through HSB. Hue - The actual color (0 - 360º) Saturation - The intensity or purity of a color (0 - 100%) Brightness - The amount of black or white mixed with a color (0 - 100%) By understanding and adjusting these 3 fundamental properties you can create custom colors with precise control. I recommend this article by Steven Bradley for more detailed definitions of HSB. Color Ramps A color ramp is a specific range of colors that work well together, arranged according to brightness. Here is an example of what I consider a good color ramp. Brightness steadily increases from left to right in this example. As the colors reach high brightness levels it's important to decrease saturation, or you'll end up with intense eye burning colors. Also, colors with very low brightness can become overly rich and weighty with high saturation. Saturation peaks in the middle swatch in this example. A good color ramp should also apply hue-shifting, which is a transition in hue across the color ramp. In the previous example the hue is shifting by positive degrees as the brightness increases. Many beginners overlook hue-shifting and end up with 'straight ramps' that only transition brightness and saturation. There is no law that says you can't do this but the resulting colors will lack interest and be difficult to harmonize with ramps of a different hue. This only makes sense to me if you want a monochromatic look and stick to one straight ramp. The Palette A color ramp is essentially a palette, but most palettes contain multiple ramps. I like to create large palettes with lots of ramps, which I can then pull smaller palettes from per assignment. Mondo - 128 colors Become a Pixel Insider member and download Mondo I took the opportunity to make a brand new palette for this tutorial. My intention was to create a general purpose palette that strikes a balance between vibrant colors and desaturated natural colors. So, how to make such a large palette? First I decide how many swatches I want per ramp and how many degrees of hue shift. For this palette I want 9 swatches per ramp with 20 degrees of positive hue shift between each swatch. I like a lot of hue shift because it creates harmony between ramps and just looks neat, but 20 is about as high as I go. The color picker panel in Photoshop. We only need to be concerned with adjusting HSB. I use Photoshop, but a similar color picker panel should be accessible in just about any graphics software. To start I pick a color that will fit right in the the middle of a ramp. The hue is somewhat arbitrary, but the saturation and brightness is critical. I want the middle color to be be the most vibrant so I set the saturation and hue to the max combined number I'm willing to go. After I've chosen my first color I can set the hue for the remaining swatches based on the positive 20 degree shift I wanted. I could reverse the direction of hue shift if I want but positive hue shift usually results in more natural colors, warming as they become brighter. I still need to sort out the increments for S&B. Unlike hue, shifting the S&B in uniform increments doesn't necessarily produce satisfactory results. However, there are a few tendencies I follow. Brightness consistently increases from left to right and usually never starts at 0, unless I want black. Saturation peaks around the middle and never fully goes to 100, or 0. The goal in mind is to create even contrast between each color. After some tuning and eyeballing these are my final values and resulting color ramp. The hue shift looks pretty strong but it will make sense when I add more ramps. This version shows the difference in the increments. Pay attention to what the S&B are doing. You can see there is some consistency in the pattern. The saturation takes larger steps on the ends and smaller steps in the middle where it's the highest percentage. The brightness takes smaller steps as it gets closer to the end at full 100%. Here's another visualization that clearly shows the flow of S&B as line graphs. You don't have to follow this general flow of S&B. It just depends what look you're going for. I've made ramps where the saturation continues to climb as the brightness decreases, creating an X pattern. This results in vivid dark colors. The biggest mistake is combining high saturation and brightness, unless you want to burn some eyeballs. I recommend a lot of experimentation with the HSB values of your ramp. I've tried to come up with mathematically precise formulas but it always seems to come down to trusting the eyeballs to some extent. Now let's finish the palette. Up to this point all I have been doing is picking colors and drawing them as single pixel dots on a tiny canvas. I haven't actually added any swatches into the swatch panel. With the first ramp established all I have to do to create more ramps for my palette is shift the entire set of hues. I want 8 ramps total so I will shift the hues of each ramp by 45 degrees to complete the 360 degree cycle around the color wheel. I could do this in the color picker by adjusting the H value one color at a time, but In Photoshop I can save a lot of time by duplicating the ramp and changing the hue of the entire selection (Image-Adjustments-hue/saturation, or ⌘+U). After adjusting the hue of all my color ramps my palette appears like this. It looks pretty nice but It's lacking more neutral desaturated colors. To add desaturated colors I duplicate the whole middle section of the palette, omitting only the darkest and lightest colors on the ends, flip it over and desaturate them with the Hue/Saturation panel. I omit the light and dark columns because they appear nearly the same as the originals. I flip the colors because it makes for easy navigation, and it looks cool. The desaturated colors can provide a more natural look, and work well as grays in combination with the vibrant colors. The final task is actually adding the colors into the swatch panel. With the color picker panel open I sample each color with the eyedropper and click the 'Add to Swatches' button. I add them from left to right, top to bottom so they will appear in the swatch panel in the correct order. This is quite tedious but the only way I know of to add the colors in the particular order I want. Once I've added all the colors into the swatch panel I click on the panel options and make sure to save my palette. I can then easily load the palette as a .aco file into the swatch panel anytime. Also, by selecting 'Save Swatches for Exchange' you can create a .ase file, which can be loaded into several other Adobe programs. Save the image of your palette as a .png file and you can load it into Aseprite. Well, that completes my 128 color palette - Mondo. Now let's look at how I use the palette with some examples. Picking Colors This example keeps it pretty simple, mostly relying on horizontal ramps of adjacent colors. You can also see how the warm desaturated colors work nicely with the vivid hues. I've added white into palette for extra contrast. This example shows how ramps can move horizontally and diagonally. Because of the hue shift every color is surrounded by colors that can work together. Harmony is everywhere, just pick and play! This example uses complimentary color in combination with neutrals. The result captures an ominous yet hopeful feeling that perfectly fits the mood I wanted. Picking colors for your art always requires some good sense, but a versatile palette with criss-crossing ramps like this makes it much easier. A little color goes a long way with pixel art, as you can see I never use a lot of colors for any one image. Creating a palette with this method also works great for game art, and will ensure everything in your game has consistent colors. I used this method to create a 160 color palette for Thyrian Defenders. We've been able to depict an incredible range of environments and characters while maintaining a consistent look overall. Other aesthetic choices come into play, but color is the fundamental ingredient that ties everything together. Final Word Overall I'm quite happy with how this palette turned out. I think you'll be seeing more of my work in the Mondo palette from now on! I hope this helps you come up with some palettes of your own. I know It can take a bit of time to get a feel for HSB, but even if you're a beginner I think making palettes like this is a great way to understand color. Go crazy with HSB and don't be afraid to experiment with formulas that look different than my example. Also, you don't have to make such a large palette. Start with trying to make a small ramp. About The Author Raymond Schlitter (Slynyrd) is a former graphic designer who turned his creative passion to pixel art and game design in early 2015. Now he shares his knowledge with tutorials while he continues to make fantastic art and work on games. Support him on Patreon and get the inside scoop on his latest work. Note: This post was originally published on Raymond's blog, and is reproduced here with kind permission from the author. If you enjoyed this article please consider supporting Raymond on Patreon, where he provides backers with exclusive downloads such the Mondo palette as .aco, .ase, and .png files. Get Mondo! You can also make a one time donation to the author if you prefer not to subscribe on Patreon. [Wayback Machine Archive]
  11. Hey there, I'm very new to this forum so i have no idea, if someone has the time to help me out a bit. So.. I'm working on a Kingdom Hearts Game. I nearly finished the Engine of the Game, but i need to make more sprites and animations for the characters. The Game will not be that long or have a real story, i just planned to make all Organisation Battles from Kingdom Hearts II in 2D graphics. The Gameplay will be like KH2 or other Kingdom Hearts Titles. You will be able to change your start conditions like you want (for Example: Lvl 1, Critical & No Experience or Lvl 99, Beginner etc). You will have Items, Abilities, Spells and you can customize shortcuts like in Kingdom Hearts II. I'm open to ideas and suggestions. If you are interested in this Project and want to help me out with sprites, pls PM me. I really need help and if it's done i will buy ice-cream to everyone who helped me I will include a few Screenshot that you can picture what it will look like and if you help i will send you a Demo-Version ^^ And sorry for my bad English Thank you for your attention i forgot to say the sprites and graphics that are actually in the game will not be the graphics that will be in the finished version
  12. Hi, I'm looking for some artists for a top-down medieval pixel art game. It's a little hack and slash game with a pretty generic storyline. I'm currently designing the game and getting the basic mechanics programmed, and I have a friend that is willing to do some level design. Right now I would like an animated character and some environment tiles to get started with art. You will be following flavor text and a pretty rigid set of needed assets with descriptions. You then are free to add what you like and I will try to incorporate it into the game. Right now I have 17 levels (I am trying to reduce it to about 10 though) of varied sizes, but the game will be linear (there are 2 villages that will have a more open map though). Each of these levels have some new enemies and have their own environmental taste, so we might be looking at 20-30 creatures all together, mostly redundant environment tiles, and then several animated props and items. This is mostly meant to be a fun project, where you and I can meet developers and make a game or two together. I don't plan on selling this game, it is open source and written in Lua using Defold. If you'd like to see code I've written I can PM you my github, you can PM me here for more details! Thanks
  13. Hi everyone! Just want to everyone to know that I have published DevLog #4 for my upcoming game 13 RONIN, a pixel-art samurai fighter in the spirit of classics like The way of the exploding fist and Barbarian. In DevLog #4 I'm writing about my new tool Ester. It's an editor for tuning spritesheet animations and generating json-files describing the animations. For anyone doing spritesheet animations it might be worth checking out. Happy coding! jan.
  14. sneaky_squirrel

    Researching my Animation Pipeline

    This is my first blog post. I am making a videogame as a learning exercise, using SDL 2.0 as my framework (I can't call it an engine, but I'm using it as my game engine). I opted to attempt a 2D Turn Based game. Animation I have followed SDL tutorials and am now familiar with [Textures] and [Rectangles] in SDL, necessary for animating characters in the game. I wrote wrapper code to turn my sprite sheets into living characters. Now that I have achieved animation implementation, I focused on getting a practical art asset pipeline (drawing the sprite sheets). 1) I first tried Medibang. I had to manually position the sprites in my sprite sheet, and the Surface Pro 4 (tablet) didn't work. 2) I then tried using Graphics Gale. I found out I'm a terrible pixel artist. 3) I checked out Krita again. It turns my tablet into an electric oven. But I can draw without lag, it has animation support, exports a series of png files, and I can use texture Packer to create the sprite sheet. Gif with 1 Boar was made with Medibang. The 3 sprite men were made with Graphics Gale, and the three boars were made with [ Krita + Texture Packer ]. What did I learn? Animation is expensive, took me way longer to draw 16 frames of animation than I would have liked. I want to focus more on programming more features, and less on animating. Although I do want to see how "pretty" I can push a game. For now, I'll try to stick to easier character designs and shorter idle animations.
  15. Hey all I am available to do art projects for games. I will do them for FREE just for the experience. I have very simple requests/stipulations.,.1. I am not looking or wanting to be a full team member.2. You allow me to display my finished pieces in my ArtStation.com protfolio2. No pixel art, and no demons, dragons, or religion pieces.3. You are flexible in your time limits and art requirements.You can view samples of my painted art here >>> https://www.artstation.com/pdavidcunninghamYou can view my earliest scenery paintings here >>> https://circlestudios.deviantart.com/You can view samples of my coloring of others art here >>> https://davidcunningham.deviantart.com/If interested, email me at: davidcunningham@email.com
  16. Esoteric Software has made Spine 3.6 available. Spine is an animation tool for 2D animation in games. In the 3.6 release, the team focused on bug fixes and improving existing features, but they did manage to add a few major features, including: Preview Clipping Tint Black Mesh Manipulation Tools Weight Painting Point Attachments And more...including runtime enhancements and optimizations. A free trial is available, but full versions are available for purchase. Learn more from their blog post.
  17. pritchie

    2D Artists needed

    Need an artist to make tiles, scenes and sprites for an RTS game that is far in development. Would also like to rebrand an app we released last year.
  18. I'm thinking of developing a 2d fighting fame for pc and I was curious as to how much animations would cost per character. I would also like to know the difference between hiring for traditional sprite sheet animation, where an artist would develop each frame of an animation, vs creating animations through something like spine. I read somewhere that artists can charge anywhere from 8-15 dollars per frame for sprite sheet animations, so for a 300 animation requirement at $10 per frame, that would be around $3,000. Does this sound like a reasonable estimate for 2d animators today? What about the cost of a single animation from the use of something like spine where animations are created through skeletons and keyframes? Any info on the subject would be appreciated.
  19. Looking for a team to work on game development. About Me: I currently work in Web Development, primarily PHP, JS, and SQL, with some front-end work. Previously was into Game Dev but no paid jobs, just projects such as Renegade Medieval, and some community assets in Dota2. Developer Dabbled in Unity (low to medium experience with C#, it's similar to Java which I've used more of) Basic coding in GameMaker, similar to JavaScript, but didn't get much further than HeartBeast tutorials Some level design in Unreal Engine (also managed to get a character rigged and in, but that was years ago) Artist 3D modelling, primarily characters, high poly sculpting to low poly retopology, unwrapping, and baking 2D pixel art, and textures (not much in terms of 2D concept art though) You can see some of the stuff I do here. Requirements: Looking for a team with an established concept and development already underway. I'd like to see some examples and game engine progress before dedicating time to assets / characters. Communicative team Ideally a team working on just the one project Flexible working hours, I won't be able to give a great deal of time And that's it really. If you could include information in the comments below, or PMs that would be great.
  20. An original fantasy RP game needs dedicated, self-motivated, and chill individuals! We have a story and general plot already set up, ready to be expanded upon. Miasma: Twilight Decree is a 2D roleplay adventure game. It’s set in a unique fantasy world with a vast map containing continents and oceans alike. Players are given one objective: to endure the troublous environments Allagia have to offer and successfully progress through time to reach the Age of Technology. The stakes are high, and every character’s actions can alter the world – or reset everything back to the beginning ages. MTD features a blend of survival aspects, dark themes, with the ability to make a mark in the history books. What we're currently looking for: • Writers - Super creative individuals who have experience in lore-making, world-building, and know their way around fantasy writing. All of the general elements are here [setting, plot, etc.] and need some "fluffing out"[quest lines, clans/ factions/ families, etc.]. Bonus points to those who can whip up spells and skills. • Artists - Mainly those who specialize in pixelated art, or people who can make concept art [since we lack pictures]. • Project Manager - Someone who is organized and can keep this project on the rails. As thorough as I am, it's difficult to cover all the bases on my own. • Other Positions - Anything else to fill in the gaps. We currently use Wikidot for our wiki; someone with CSS and syntax experience to polish it up would be awesome. A musician/ composer for all things musical. Way later down the road, we'll need community managers, DMs, and the such, though it isn't necessary at the moment. Other information: I've been working on this project since the beginning of 2017 with a group of friends. Life basically prohibited a lot of us from continuing on with it, and it went on hiatus for a while. I'm making an attempt to bring this back from the dead since plenty of time and effort went into it beforehand. It goes without saying that I also have a passion for roleplaying. I cannot stress enough that anyone interested should be into fantasy settings or D&D. Otherwise, you're probably not going to have fun with helping! We do have a Patreon with a few supporters, and Discord. Until things really start moving, we'll be using Discord to collaborate. For any questions, comments, or concerns, feel free to comment below or add me on discord @ Allagia X#9174 [best method of contact] for more info about this project.
  21. G-Dot

    Free grenade art

    Hello everyone. I don't know is it a good place to share my link, but I have a small collection of grenades and I want to share them with people. They are totally free - https://gum.co/xOlQD
  22. Airlock 22 is seeking a Sprite Artist to help create the art and animations for a video game we are developing. Artwork is currently just placeholders done by myself until we can get someone with much more experience to help out! Responsibilities: - Create Sprites that the Engineering team will be able to bring into the game under production. - Assist with Sprite animations if it is something you are comfortable with. - Collaborate with other team members to develop artwork for current and future projects. Requirements: - Ability to work independently - Ability to focus while working remotely - You are able to create your artwork in a well-lit environment Pluses: - Experience with Sprite Animation - A very creative mind - Excited to help build a studio from the ground up. Please contact me at kevin@airlock22.co
  23. Retro FPS Avatars is an system to create and control 8-direction sprites in First Person Shooter style games.It is my own implementation of systems that has been used in oldschool FPS games.I have been asked questions about the solution of the sprite system that I used in my Wolfenstein3D clone game: Wolf.3D - Oldschool Wolfenstein 3D clone in Unity 3D [WIP] I decided to prepare such a system for the Unity store. Soon I will try to write more about this system but for now here is a promotional video.
  24. We are looking for people to help develop games with us. This is a job opportunity for people just starting out in the industry and we cannot pay for your assistance. This job is unpaid and voluntary. We want artists of any kind to send us samples of their work to our email account avidspacelovers@gmail.com so that we can determine whether or not your art style is the one we are looking for. Criteria - Must be willing to volunteer for an unpaid position - Must have a unique art style - Must provide us with samples of your work and; - Must provide us the reason to why you wish to work with us Important Notes: We will ask you if you wish to continue working for us after the game you helped developed is released. Those who wish to stay with us will retain all previous criteria and will continue to volunteer for unpaid work. We have these job opportunities open to anyone of any age or talent and we will try to provide further assistance with answering any further questions you may have. Our job opportunities are meant for you to get your name out there early because we believe that the more games you helped developed then the more things you can add onto your resume. Our job opportunities are NOT meant for those who have already got their names out there but we will consider all applicants. We will gladly refer you to other game developers if you ask and have had a prior job placement with us. We hope to see your work and if you get a job with us we can promise to give you a free game key that will allow you to get the game for free. After all, you need something for your hard work. Thank you for taking the time to read this job application post.
  25. Finally coming to grips with the new tools and having something to show for it! There's been a real headache and a half over this, but hopefully it pays off with a bunch of dropped jaws and people saying "Oh, that's cool." when they first open the game.. I need to settle into a groove! Time to crank out some content! (Check the link for the full, HUGE blog post)
  • Advertisement
×

Important Information

By using GameDev.net, you agree to our community Guidelines, Terms of Use, and Privacy Policy.

GameDev.net is your game development community. Create an account for your GameDev Portfolio and participate in the largest developer community in the games industry.

Sign me up!