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Found 3225 results

  1. THE PROJECT INT is a 3D Sci-fi RPG with a strong emphasis on story, role playing, and innovative RPG features such as randomized companions. The focus is on the journey through a war-torn world with fast-paced combat against hordes of enemies. The player must accomplish quests like a traditional RPG, complete objectives, and meet lively crew members who will aid in the player's survival. Throughout the game you can side and complete missions through criminal cartels, and the two major combatants, the UCE and ACP, of the Interstellar Civil War. Please note that all of our current positions are remote work. You will not be required to travel. Talent Needed Unity Engine Programmer Website Administrator 3D Animator We have made great strides in the year 2017! INT has received a comprehensive face-lift compared to the start of the year. We look forward to a productive, fruitful year 2018! Revenue-Share This is the perfect opportunity to get into the game development industry. Being an Indie team we do not have the creative restrictions often imposed by publishers or other third parties. We are extremely conscientious of our work and continuously uphold a high level of quality throughout our project. We are unable to offer wages or per-item payments at this time. However revenue-sharing from crowd-funding is offered to team members who contribute 15-20 hours per week to company projects, as well as maintain constant communication and adhere to deadlines. Currently the crowd-funding campaign is scheduled for the year 2018. Your understanding is dearly appreciated. Thank you for your time! We look forward to hearing from you! John Shen HR Lead Starboard Games LLC
  2. Energy particles being harnessed by collection multi-hedron energy matrix. Whuuuttt? Love it :)
  3. Postmortem

    Post mortem: Infinity game’s It’s a blob It’s a blob is a top down puzzle platformer with a cute pixel art style to the game. Currently only available on itchio. In the game you play as the character Blob (very creative I know), Blob is part of a solitary alien race; their influence is spread over many galaxies however they are destined to spend their lives alone. But Blob is different, he doesn’t want to be alone, so it’s his goal to reunite his people. Blob spends many of centuries (blobs live for a real long time) searching for some old alien technology that linked all his kind together. Pretty much the equivalent of Blob interdimensional Facebook and that’s where the players story begins. Blob actually found it! And now it is his mission to seek out and reunite his blobs once again. We’re a very early indie games studio made up of students from SAE Quantm based in Brisbane, Australia. With varying backgrounds that make a well-rounded team. Our team wanted to create a game that would be filled with the same fun and experiences as other games had been in our childhoods. Overall, we weren’t looking for any financial gain from this project but instead knowledge and experience that we could take to future projects. What went right 1. Ideas stage Through brainstorming sessions and generally just bouncing ideas off each other we were able to come up with a concept fairly quickly for the project. Being able to get this information in a visual form and voting on what ideas we would use was an integral part of our process. 2. Scope As this project had a deadline of 12 weeks, it was very important that we didn’t over shoot with what we were capable of producing in that time period. In fact, we under shot this quite a bit. While all the mechanics were in place, the amount of levels we had to explore those were so few we had to expand them by double. This wasn’t an issue though as we had plenty of time to alter and improve on the project. 3. Style From the beginning we had a clear direction for the art style, wanting a fun and classic looking game, in the form of pixel art. Which was both easy to produce and visually pleasing to consume. The style remained mostly the same through out the project getting a visual tweak in the polishing stages, this was done for both visual clarity and especially if animations were involved. 4. Testing The game was play tested thoroughly as new mechanics were added to the game and in the final stages, which picked up on majority of our bugs and problems. We also conducted a closed group alpha testing which provide to be invaluable for our game, by recording their feedback and gameplay we were able to analyze why the game wasn’t being played as we intended. Apart from a few in game bugs we hadn’t picked on, the main issue was giving the player to much freedom in tutorials and as a result they were not doing them or completing them in the wrong linear order which hindered their overall experience within the game. The way we worked This was an interesting task, being university students, we did have time in class to do some work but most of our time was apart. We assigned a project manager to the group who split tasks and generally kept a track of the work needing to be done. Although a scrum method was applied, it was a loose method. Mostly just addressing issue that arose and applying things in order as we needed it (art assets being left until later). Meetings were held every Monday afternoon on our own discord channel for several hours, as previous work was verified, and new work was assigned from that point. Further contact was kept through a Facebook page, so we could upload and share content on a more frequent basis. What went wrong 1. Puzzle refinement As mentioned in the testing section, level designs concepts that we thought were obvious as developers were not obvious to players, resulting in a poor player experience in our initial alpha testing. By changing the layout of the (portal room) and altering the intended path of the player (forcing them to complete levels in a certain order) we were able to fix this. However, it required more time and effort than was necessary than if we considered this at an early stage. 2. Not planning ahead This was a big one, while we had an idea what we wanted and incorporated that into the game this changed throughout the project, with new ideas being tested and trialed on the fly. Sometimes working and sometimes causing more issues. These included: · Changing camera perspective through game development (many hours changing and recoding) · Changing level design · Recoding the interactions between player and objects · Change of assets · UI However, the results of this undeniably improved our game, but by planning ahead and coming up with a conclusive design, we could have mitigated these risks and saved ourselves a lot of time. 3. Management This was something that was a bit all over the place, initially task were delegated as they were needed to the people appropriate... great, however as the project went on and the focus was more on coding, tasks were being split unnecessarily for the sake of feeling included in that point in time. This resulted in a mess of trying to collaborate work, double ups of some work and sometimes things just not being done at all. In the end it reverted to the old method of only being given to the appropriate people. Some delegated tasks were not being completed as well, forcing others to pick up slack to make sure the project was on time. Conclusion Overall this was a great experience for us as early developers, even though it had its ups and downs. It gave us an insight into many of the aspects of both team work and the development of a game. We learned a lot through out the process too and im sure we will all be taking these lessons on to future projects. It’s a blob was never meant to be anything more than an educational project but to me it become so much more than that. I’m proud of it Development stats · Developer: Infinity Games · Release date: Dec 2017, PC & Mac · Link to game: https://lazareth13.itch.io/its-a-blob · Length of development: 12 weeks · Number of developers: 5, (4 at a later point) · Development tools: Unity, photoshop, visual studio, monodevelop, · Budget: N/A · Sleepless nights: 2
  4. FES Retro Game Framework is now available on the Unity Asset Store for your kind consideration! FES was born when I set out to start a retro pixel game project. I was looking around for an engine to try next. I tried a number of things, from GameMaker, to Fantasy Consoles, to MonoGame and Godot and then ended up back at Unity. Unity is just unbeatable in it's cross-platform support, and ease of deployment, but it sure as heck gets in the way of proper retro pixel games! So I poured over the Unity pipeline and found the lowest levels I could tie into and bring up a new retro game engine inside of Unity, but with a completely different source-code-only, classic game-loop retro blitting and bleeping API. Months of polishing and tweaking later I ended up with FES. Some FES features: Pixel perfect rendering RGB and Indexed color mode, with palette swapping support Primitive shape rendering, lines, rectangles, ellipses, pixels Multi-layered tilemaps with TMX file support Offscreen rendering Text rendering, with text alignment, overflow settings, and custom pixel font support Clipping Sound and Music APIs Simplified Input handling Wide pixel support (think Atari 2600) Post processing and transition effects, such as scanlines, screen wipes, screen shake, fade, pixelate and more Deploy to all Unity supported platforms I've put in lots of hours into a very detail documentation, you can flip through it here to get an better glimpse at the features and general overview: http://www.pixeltrollgames.com/fes/docs/index.html FES is carefully designed and well optimized (see live stress test demo below). Internally it uses batching, it chunks tilemaps, is careful about memory allocations, and tries to be smart about any heavy operations. Please have a quick look at the screenshots and live demos below and let me know what you think! I'd love to hear some opinions, feedback and questions! I hope I've tickled your retro feels! More images at: https://imgur.com/a/LFMAc Live demo feature reel: https://simmer.io/@Dafu/fes Live blitting stress test: https://simmer.io/@Dafu/fes-drawstress Unity Asset Store: https://www.assetstore.unity3d.com/#!/content/102064 View full story
  5. FES Retro Game Framework is now available on the Unity Asset Store for your kind consideration! FES was born when I set out to start a retro pixel game project. I was looking around for an engine to try next. I tried a number of things, from GameMaker, to Fantasy Consoles, to MonoGame and Godot and then ended up back at Unity. Unity is just unbeatable in it's cross-platform support, and ease of deployment, but it sure as heck gets in the way of proper retro pixel games! So I poured over the Unity pipeline and found the lowest levels I could tie into and bring up a new retro game engine inside of Unity, but with a completely different source-code-only, classic game-loop retro blitting and bleeping API. Months of polishing and tweaking later I ended up with FES. Some FES features: Pixel perfect rendering RGB and Indexed color mode, with palette swapping support Primitive shape rendering, lines, rectangles, ellipses, pixels Multi-layered tilemaps with TMX file support Offscreen rendering Text rendering, with text alignment, overflow settings, and custom pixel font support Clipping Sound and Music APIs Simplified Input handling Wide pixel support (think Atari 2600) Post processing and transition effects, such as scanlines, screen wipes, screen shake, fade, pixelate and more Deploy to all Unity supported platforms I've put in lots of hours into a very detail documentation, you can flip through it here to get an better glimpse at the features and general overview: http://www.pixeltrollgames.com/fes/docs/index.html FES is carefully designed and well optimized (see live stress test demo below). Internally it uses batching, it chunks tilemaps, is careful about memory allocations, and tries to be smart about any heavy operations. Please have a quick look at the screenshots and live demos below and let me know what you think! I'd love to hear some opinions, feedback and questions! I hope I've tickled your retro feels! More images at: https://imgur.com/a/LFMAc Live demo feature reel: https://simmer.io/@Dafu/fes Live blitting stress test: https://simmer.io/@Dafu/fes-drawstress Unity Asset Store: https://www.assetstore.unity3d.com/#!/content/102064
  6. Hello all, I've been hard at work on a new retro pixel-perfect framework called FES Retro Game Framework. It is now available on the Unity Asset Store for your kind consideration! FES was born when I set out to start a retro pixel game project. I was looking around for an engine to try next. I tried a number of things, from GameMaker, to Fantasy Consoles, to MonoGame and Godot and then ended up back at Unity. Unity is just unbeatable in it's cross-platform support, and ease of deployment, but it sure as heck gets in the way of proper retro pixel games! So I poured over the Unity pipeline and found the lowest levels I could tie into and bring up a new retro game engine inside of Unity, but with a completely different source-code-only, classic game-loop retro blitting and bleeping API. Months of polishing and tweaking later I ended up with FES. Some FES features: Pixel perfect rendering RGB and Indexed color mode, with palette swapping support Primitive shape rendering, lines, rectangles, ellipses, pixels Multi-layered tilemaps with TMX file support Offscreen rendering Text rendering, with text alignment, overflow settings, and custom pixel font support Clipping Sound and Music APIs Simplified Input handling Wide pixel support (think Atari 2600) Post processing and transition effects, such as scanlines, screen wipes, screen shake, fade, pixelate and more Deploy to all Unity supported platforms I've put in lots of hours into a very detail documentation, you can flip through it here to get an better glimpse at the features and general overview: http://www.pixeltrollgames.com/fes/docs/index.html FES is carefully designed and well optimized (see live stress test demo below). Internally it uses batching, it chunks tilemaps, is careful about memory allocations, and tries to be smart about any heavy operations. Please have a quick look at the screenshots and live demos below and let me know what you think! I'd love to hear some opinions, feedback and questions! I hope I've tickled your retro feels! More images at: https://imgur.com/a/LFMAc Live demo feature reel: https://simmer.io/@Dafu/fes Live blitting stress test: https://simmer.io/@Dafu/fes-drawstress My own game I started working on using FES, a roguelike, very early: https://simmer.io/@Dafu/merl Unity Asset Store: https://www.assetstore.unity3d.com/#!/content/102064
  7. Too much? I can look at this all day! Bleeping Bots Demo Popping.mp4
  8. One of the most important aspects in a shoot ’em up is certainly score. Being somewhat a niche of a genre, it has a clear competitive edge among its players. It certainly lacks fulfillment in terms of engaging story, but the adrenaline rush in combination with the goal of attaining higher and higher scores or even being on the top of the leaderboard is something really hard to beat and is specific to the genre. With that in mind, a good shmup scoring system has to be easy to understand and engaging at the same time. While it sounds simple, it can be quite hard to achieve a good “funness” factor while keeping it engaging and skill related. For Rick Henderson and the Artifact of Gods, i dissected a ton of old and new shoot ’em ups in the search for the perfect scoring system i like. One of my all time favorites is certainly Galaga Deluxe (or Warblade for PC folks) for Amiga 500 from late Mr. Edgar M. Vigdal. Besides coins used for shop purchases (which this game won’t be using until singeplayer mode is done), in Galaga you can collect gems too. Those little cuties come in different shapes and colors and each one yields a different amount of points. While not groundbreaking, it adds another layer of depth to the game besides dodging as some gems are really worth running for through a rain of bullets. Naturally, tougher enemies have higher percentage of dropping rarer gems that yield higher score addition. Another form of bonuses that can be picked up are medals. Far from my knowledge, medaling is prominent in shoot ’em ups. The concept is easy: you pick up differently colored medals, when you have the whole set, you get awarded a rank at the end of the level and the medal collection is resetted when you start the next level. You guessed it, ranks are just another name for total bonus multiplier at the end of the game. There is a total of 9 ranks you can attain (the first being the multiplier of 1, which is your default rank): Recruit Private Corporal Sergeant Lieutenant Captain Major Colonel Marshal Commander Complete randomness in spawning those can be infuriating for players with higher skill cap, but i find it refreshing to have a bit of a variety and a possibility for the medals already collected to appear again. Below you can find a weight distribution chart for the medals. When none are collected, the chance for any to spawn is equal. However, as the number of collected medals increases, the chance for already collected medals to appear diminish by 1/5 (or 20% if you like it that way). I haven’t done the exact maths, but the chance for already collected medals to appear is not that large. Of course, for collecting already collected medals, you get a nice, juicy score bonus, so they are worth catching too! Multi kill bonuses! We all played Unreal Tournament 2004 back in the day. It had a nice feature of multikills which i use in my game in a bit different form. For those who haven’t played it, you get multikill for killing two enemies in a row without dying. As your kill count progresses (again, without dying) you get megakill, ultra kill and so on. In Rick Henderson and the Artifact of Gods it functions based on time between two kills. When you kill an enemy, an invisible timer starts counting down. If you manage to kill another enemy until the counter hits 0, you get double kill and the timer resets. If you manage to get another one until timer counts down, you get a multi kill, all the way to monster kill. Of course, every additional kill is awared with more and more points. This is usually possible with area of effect weapons (explosive ones) and weapons like Railgun, which can go through multiple enemies, encouraging player to invest more skill in the game. Grazing bonus is usually omnipresent in bullet hells, a hardcore subgenre of shmups. It encourages the player to “graze” bullets, ie. pass very close to them without getting hit. Design itself was a bit harder to implement since it involves tracking multiple bullets at a time getting into the graze range and checking whether they hit the player or not. While not neccessary for the gameplay since i don’t want it to be bullet hell, it’s one of those things setting apart rookies from hardcore players that want to get the most out the game. And finally, the good old bonus multiplier which adds up with every destroyed enemy, gets lowered when you get hit, and reset at every waves end. It goes well in combination with grazing bonus, making you get closer to the bullets but not get hit. It also serves as a kind of damage control system. Since i gave up on the idea of having a 0-100 healh bar and chose a 10 life bar instead, hits from tougher enemies take more of your bonus multiplier down. I believe the score mechanics are very easy to understand and will add up much to the investment of the player and the adrenaline pumping of the true genre players. The post Scoring System Design appeared first on Fat Pug Studio. View the full article
  9. Bleeping Bots! Mission 03 - Verdestun

    That planet is awesome!!! It's just slowly dissipating into space. Death by emmissions Love the green and yellow-orange juxtaposition (did I just say that?).
  10. PHP MYSQL MMORPG

    well, i have started developing games last year, alone , I made a singleplayer 3d openworld rpg on unity you can look at it on googleplaystore ( kooru stone rpg ) whatever, this year, i wanted to make mmo, which gone really fine until I first try real hosting, I was working on "wamp" until then. The reason i am desperate now is that the way my game works. On my pc, using wamp mysql , with localhost as host for my game, i was testing my mmorpg with using andorid emulators, ofcourse no lag no issues no restrictions, beautiful dream... But then, I wanted to get real host from web, so, I rent a basic, cheaphest ever web host ( 10$ year ), and transferred my php files along with sql database. So, I launched the game, still no issues, tried to handle 2-3 players by using my pc, phone, friend's phone... After a while, ( after really short time (3-4mins)) host started not to respond, beacause those web hosting were not fit to handle mmos, i predicted that. now what i am explaining is that my game works like this and asking what way should i use to handle it : - Creates web request ( like : webhost.com/game/getplayerdata.php?ID=2 ) -Reads request ( request result be like = "ID2-GoodGuyXx-23-123-4-123-43 ) -Builds player using result string -does similar requests REEAALY FREQUENTLY ( total requests of 8 - 12 times per seconds ) With my current ultimate cheap web hosting, i can handle 2 players with low lag ( lol ) but, i want to handle around 20-100 players, just need a clear path, i have been struggling with google cloud sql and other vps server dedicated server options, i dont wanna pay much and get ripped off.
  11. Hi, there! Work on TERRORHYTHM is in full swing. Over the past week, we have managed to develop and add animation to the main character and the enemy. We also tweaked the location environment. Check out the difference between before and now.
  12. Laser bolas? Yes!

    D.O.T is an abstract arena shooter in which you fight for highscore with good or bad weapons. Follow me if you want more info: https://twitter.com/bombjackm
  13. Yasss!!! My first Unity3d game is on the App Store and Google Play. Download please! About 30 minutes to get through 5 missions. Let me know what you guys think. Thanks a bunch
  14. Secret Santa

    Hi again everyone! Today I’m writing a small devlog just to let you know that FAXIME has entered Reddit Gifts Secret Santa and we’ve already received our present! We asked for something for our office and we got a a mat ahah it’s really cute, I’ll leave a picture down below! We've thanked on reddit and our Santa reveled herself muahahah. Basically everyone who knocks at our door smiles :). And we’ll also be at Comic Con Portugal this saturday! Swing by IPCA’s stand if you’re over here in Portugal! On the holiday spirit Happy Hanukkah for the ones who celebrate it! Fun fact: In Portugal we eat more sufganiyan during the summer! [Image made by our team member Lidar] See you soon…. The FAXIME Team Follow us and keep updated at: Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/FaximeGames Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/faximegames Twitter: https://twitter.com/FaximeGames Pintrest: https://www.pinterest.pt/faximegames SoundCloud: https://soundcloud.com/faximegames
  15. I've been doing some digging and come to the conclusion that I'm not really qualified to identify a game engine for my project alone so I came here asking for some advice. My game idea involves movement inside a sphere where you always have your feet on the ground (the "walls" of the sphere), basically an inverted planet. It's supposed to be multiplayer so it's not just you moving in the world. When you jump, gravity (or force etc) pulls your character towards where it jumped from and the character model should have its feet pointing that way. I'm really new to this and my own conclusion is that it messes with core functionality of Unreal Engine 4 which makes it really hard for me as a beginner to wrap my head around. It comes with practice but It's hard for me to come to a fair conclusion on what engine to use based on my knowledge. Therefore I'm asking for some guidance. I have most experience with the Unreal Engine. What engine would you recommend? Is the game idea with being inside a sphere difficult to do in general? Do you have any tips? I'm kinda lost at the moment so thank you for the help!
  16. PROMO Codes

    We would like to give out promo codes for our children's app Abigail's Tales: First Day Butterflies, tailored towards kids ages 6 thru 8. If you have children and want a code please message us at info@dabsterent.com the app looks best on iPad.
  17. Hello everyone! I hope you’re all feeling the spirit of Christmas. And Happy Hanukkah if that’s the case. Today I wanted to give you an update on what we’ve been up to. Lately we have been trying to make our team grow. We’ve been needing help on the artist side of the game, since it was falling a bit behind. And I think we’ve succeeded! So, who is part of FAXIME now? You already know me (Teresa) and Gil. And of course, you know Midday Mayhem, the artist who has done most of the current concept art and 3D models of SpaceVille. We now have a new 3D artist; his name is Lidar Thomas. He’s the one who made the bunny’s 3D model we’ve shared already on our social media! He also does smartwatch faces. You can check them out here. Two new people are also helping us with the UI and UX. They’re Oscar and John! They’ve started doing UI icons for the tools. Spoiler alert: They looks great! Maybe they will be out for the next version of the alpha? Now on a different art aspect, MUSIC yes!! We have a new member just focused on SpaceVille’s music. He is our youngest member (laughs) with only 15 years old! He’s a great composer! And soon we will have a new concept artist to help Midday! Meanwhile we also have an intern, Miguel, and he did this awesome promo image for us! Sorry for the long post! Anyway... I guess that’s all for today. If you’re Portuguese I hope to see you this week at Comic Con Portugal! Happy Holidays! The FAXIME Team Follow us and keep updated at: Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/FaximeGames Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/faximegames Twitter: https://twitter.com/FaximeGames Pintrest: https://www.pinterest.pt/faximegames SoundCloud: https://soundcloud.com/faximegames
  18. Margot Allard upper body

    From the album Beneath the Waves

  19. Margot Allard body

    From the album Beneath the Waves

  20. hey guys i hope you doing all well. last night i released my first game in google app store, i really appreciate you guys to download it. and share your reviews about it the idea of game comes from mini hackgame of Bioshock. link of download: https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.RVBinary.piperist many thanks
  21. Design Prioritisation

    The design team initially proposed that we use the spaceship as the central HUB world for the player to return to after a mission’s closure, with this decision unanimous, we began to work chronologically into the game. On the contrary to regular practice and due to inexperience, we began working on the players introduction to the game and tutorial first, before turning our attention to the roguelike elements required, as per the brief. Much of the design work that the team and I worked on was based around the level design of the HUB world and the narrative that could be construed through onboarding. Due to the focus in this area, the main game suffered inattention. Systematically speaking, once the scripts were working in the HUB world, they were supposed to translate smoothly into the level generation there after. Unfortunately this did not go as planned and by the time our attentions had turned to the procedural generation, serious system issues began to highlight themselves. I believe that if we had have worked solely on the procedural generation first to meet the brief requirements and then worked backwards, creating the HUB world then the tutorial, we would have a product that is much more compatible with the brief. As I venture into other projects, this lesson learned in prioritising, I feel is the most important one that I will carry with me to ensure this issue is not repeated in future endeavors.
  22. Grids Pro Asset Offset

    Colony 7 relies on a grid system for assets to snap together, this is so that when an asset is in the way of the player, the player is unable to move to that space. At the beginning of the project the team were unfamiliar with Magicavoxel and how it worked, what we hadn’t originally taken into consideration is: If I create a floor piece that is one unit deep on the Y axis; Then I make a toolbox to sit atop of the floor, on importing into Unity, the tool box would be sitting one unit inside it. However, if when I created the toolbox, I had started it one unit higher to count for height of the floor, this could have been avoided. With a ‘two birds, one stone’ approach, fixing my problem and fulfilling my programming learning outcome, I created an offset script for the assets so that they would still sit correctly on the grid for functionality. Essentially the script adjusts the transform of a child in the Y axis whereas the parent object sits on the grid. This script is able to be applied to any object that needs a slight adjustment rather than having to account for the unit height of asset placement inside of Unity when building the level. This script also made changing the design of the level easier as the assets could be placed anywhere using this script, while still fitting on the grid.
  23. Scope

    After getting the green light on the Colony 7 pitch, we entered pre production with a grand scheme that was very large in scope, but seemed achievable at the time. As production went on, hurdles were encountered with various technical aspects of the games functionality which slowed down the production itself. While technical hurdles are mostly common in all projects, it soon became a realisation that the team had not taken into consideration the potential for these hurdles to arise when defining the scope against deadlines. The effect this had on production was that with each hurdle encountered, that may have taken a day or possibly two to fix, we were losing time to implement the various other systems. In the weeks leading up to the feature complete deadline, to resolve this issue, we had to make extreme cuts to content that we had run out of time to implement. This meant that we had to cut our first level, which caused disappointment among the team. On the back of this, when weekly sprints were consistently not being met, it allowed for deflation to seep within the ranks as there was seemingly a lack of progress. Moving forward, I’ve learnt that setting an achievable scope is highly important so that the team are being given realistic goals, this not only avoids disappointment but it also avoids loss of motivation within the team. The process of making a game can be turned into one itself by setting smaller, more achievable goals for designers and programmers to hit and be rewarded with the fun and positivity we look to install in our players.
  24. Colour Pallets

    In the early stages of design the team failed to outline a clear and concise colour palette to work within. Essentially this allowed for each member of the design team to interpret the in game environments however they wished, it also meant that during the phase of asset creation, the assets were inconsistent and often contrasting. It was only when the assets had come together that this was realised and the team addressed it immediately, focusing on steel greys for the structure of the HUB world with touches of blue to compliment the Colonists uniform. At this point however, it meant creating new renditions of the assets that work in unison of each other. Mainly it was minor issues that were easily fixable such as panel details or table top colours, however one area in particular was quite problematic. When I designed the Volcanic environment, I had a significantly different idea to the other designers, this resulted in spending several hours editing the colour schemes instead of focusing on other work that had to be done at that time. Luckily not too much backtracking had to be done as the problem was identified early enough due to constant asset implementation and testing. Looking back at the plans whilst in pre-production, the colour palette was an obvious and high priority specification that just became lost in translation during the design prep. This particular problem has taught me how crucial it is to outline this early on to ensure designers are working towards a shared vision at all times, it also allows constant re-visitation during the project for guidelines.
  25. Modular Asset Kits

    Having never dived into the world of modular asset creation before, I decided to do some research into how artists and level designers work within this area. The GDC Vault has a great talk on this topic called ‘Fallout 4’s Modular Level Design’ (Linked below), it definitely helped navigate me towards the right direction, albeit there were mistakes I had to uncover for myself to truly know what the benefits of going modular were. Within the first round of assets that I had created, the problems started to highlight themselves. I had created a door asset that suggested it lead to the bridge, except the bridge was going to remain locked. When the level design was updated and we needed the bridge, it meant the doors were unusable because they needed to be able to open. Ultimately this meant redesigning the asset to animate and fit on the pro grid correctly. Original Door: Updated Door: The issue that this highlighted for my work practice, was that when layout changes were made for functionality reasons, the models I was making were inflexible, they were not singular enough to be manipulated to compliment the change and thus they quickly became redundant. At first I had to spend a considerable amount of time chasing my own tail, so to speak, correcting and editing the assets to fit into the updates. Nevertheless once they were updated and snapped together without clipping issues, it was understandable that if I had made them as singular units from the very start, I would not have wasted precious development hours. Moving forward, with asset creation and level design, I know that the more modular the assets are, the more malleable and reusable they are with unforeseen design changes. You can find the very informative GDC talk, surrounding modular level kits, by clicking this link: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QBAM27YbKZg