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Found 3872 results

  1. I'm trying to add some details like grass, rocks, trees, etc. to my little procedurally-generated planet. The meshes for the terrain are created from a spherified cube which is split in chunks (chunked LOD). To do this I've wrote a geometry shader that takes a mesh as input and uses its vertex positions as locations where the patches of grass will be placed (as textured quads). For an infinite flat world (not spherical) I'd use the terrain mesh as input to the geometry shader, but I've found that this won't work well on a sphere, since the vertex density is not homogeneous across the surface. So the main question would be: How to create a point cloud for each terrain chunk whose points were equally distributed across the chunk? Note: I've seen some examples where these points are calculated from intersecting a massive rain of totally random perpendicular rays from above... but I found this solution overkill, to say the least. Another related question would be: Is there something better/faster than the geometry shader approach, maybe using compute shaders and instancing?
  2. FedGuard

    noob questions

    Hello all, I would like to start off with thanking you all for this community. Without fora like these to assist people the already hard journey to making an own game would be exponentially more difficult. Next I would like to apologize for the long post, in advance... I am contemplating making a game. There, now that's out of the way, maybe some further details might be handy. I am not some youngster (no offence) with dreams of breaking into the industry, I am 38, have a full-time job, a wife, kid and dog so I think I am not even considered indie? However I recently found myself with additional time on my hands and decided I would try my hand at making a game.Why? Well mostly because I would like to contribute something, also because I think I have a project worth making (and of course some extra income wouldn't hurt either to be honest). The first thing I realized was, I have absolutely no relevant skill or experience. Hmm; ok, never mind, we can overcome that, right? I have spent a few months "researching",meaning looking at YouTube channels, reading articles and fora. Needless to say, I am more confused now than when I started. I also bought some courses (Blender, Unity, C#) and set out to make my ideas more concrete. I quickly discovered, I am definitely not an artist... So I decided, though I do plan to continue learning the art side eventually, I would focus on the design and development phase first. The idea being, if it takes me a year or more solely learning stuff and taking courses without actually working on my game, I would become demoralized and the risk of quitting would increase. So I thought I would: 1: Keep following the courses Unity and C# while starting on the actual game development as the courses and my knowledge progress. 2: Acquire some artwork to help me get a connection with the game and main character, and have something to helm keep me motivated. (I already did some contacting and realized this will not be cheap...). Also try to have the main character model so I can use it to start testing the initial character and game mechanics. For this I have my first concrete question. I already learned that outsourcing this will easily run up in the high hundreds or thousands of dollars... (lowest offer so far being 220 USD) I am therefore playing with the idea of purchasing https://assetstore.unity.com/packages/3d/animations/medieval-animations-mega-pack-12141 with the intention of then have an artist alter and/or add to the animations (it is for a Roman character so some shield animations are not going to work the same way.). This way I could start with the basic character mechanics. Is this a good idea, waste of money,...? Any suggestions? I then have a related but separate question. Is it a good idea to buy Playmaker (or some other similar software I haven't yet heard of like RPGAIO), and using this for initial build, then changing/adding code as the need arises? 3.Get a playable initial level ready as a rough demo and then starting to look for artist for level design and character/prop creation. ... I would really appreciate some input from more experienced people, and especially answers to my questions. Of course any advice is extremely welcome.
  3. BenchmarkNet is a console application for testing the reliable UDP networking solutions. Features: Asynchronous simulation of a large number of clients Stable under high loads Simple and flexible simulation setup Detailed session information Supported networking libraries: ENet (C# Wrapper) UNet LiteNetLib Lidgren MiniUDP Hazel Photon Neutrino DarkRift More information and source code on GitHub. You can find the latest benchmark results on the wiki page.
  4. Dirt Bike Extreme - another game made with Unity. Took about 2 months to complete. Take part in extreme motorcycle races across the dangerous and challenging tracks. Dirt Bike Extreme is easy to pick up but hard to master. Race, jump and crash your way and other mad rivals through the amazing tracks as you master the skills and physics of motocross in this high-speed racing adventure. Conquer challenging routes on 23 different runs, discover new bikes and become the best of the best! Over 257K downloads already! Windows Version: https://www.gametop.com/download-free-games/dirt-bike-extreme/ Mac Version: https://www.macstop.com/games/dirt-bike-extreme/
  5. Hello there! I’m the creator and producer of an upcoming visual novel / video game. My team and I are looking for artists (character and background), writers (experienced in writing relatable characters and witty dialogue), and programmers (familiar with unity and creating mini games). Our team is a group of close friends looking to break the mold of the traditional visual novel and create something new and positive. This game will be highly promoted and be a great portfolio piece. Rates are negotiable! If you are interested please contact/message us today! OConQuestGame@gmail.com
  6. Gas Lantern Games

    [GAME] Ant Empire

    Hello!I have spent the last year and a half developing a game in my spare time in Unity! I am releasing it soon on Steam. Ant Empire is a strategic remake of some older games. It is influenced by games such as Ant Empire and Civilization.I am currently doing a kickstarter to help fund an AI before launch.I have attached some images (tried some gifs but they were too large) to show the current stage of Ant Empire, which is nearly completed.
  7. Continuing to work on “Eldest Souls” (first article here!), I’ve begun familiarising myself with the workflow between Fmod and Unity, and the integration system. I know much of this will be pretty obvious to most, but I thought I’d share my thoughts as a complete beginner learning the ropes of sound designing. The library of sounds that Fmod provides has been very useful, at least as reference points. I’ve still kept to my ethos of producing the sounds myself as much as possible. Having said that, Fmod gives you 50 free sounds with your download, and I’ve used a wooden crate smash, a drawbridge and electricity sound you can hear in the foley video below. The thing i found most useful was witnessing changes i made in Fmod being realised instantly in Unity. If a volume needed changing, or the timing of one of my effects was off, i can literally switch to Fmod and then back to Unity and immediately see the result of my alterations. It also seems apparent that using middleware such as this (or i've heard Wwise is also equally intuitive) grants the developer, and myself included, a great deal more flexibility and opportunity to edit sounds without going all the way back to a DAW, and bouncing down again. Needless to say, my workflow is so much faster because of it. I've also loved the randomised feature of Fmod, whereby any sound can be made to sound slightly different each time it is heard. Taking a footstep recording i made for example, I was able to add further authenticity of uneven footsteps by randomising the pitch and volume of each playback. I used this technique when creating footsteps for the first major boss in the game called "The Guardian". A big, over-encumbered husk of a monster. I also had fun rummaging through the garage for old tools and metal components for the “Guardian” (the first boss) footsteps. See below! I also created a sword attack for our player, trying to sound different from the generic “woosh” I see in so many video games. I used a very “sharp” and abrasive sound to differentiate him from any enemies. On another note, I recently upgraded my microphone to a Rode NTG2 shotgun, which has been phenomenal. I haven’t had to worry about noise interfering with the clarity of my objects, whereas before with the sm58 I had to be clever with my EQ and noise reduction plugins. Important to note again that this still a “cheap” mic in comparison to most other products on the market, and all in all my entire setup is still very simple and affordable which I’m quite proud of. I’ve seen many musicians spend heaps of money on gear they don’t necessarily need. I much prefer being resourceful with less equipment, than to have more than I can understand or remember how to use. It’s forced me to understand every aspect and capability of my tools, which I believe is a principal that can be applied to any discipline. I have more fun little sound effect videos on my Instagram for those interested, where I post regular updates. Thanks for reading! (if you’ve made it this far) www.sergioronchetti.com INSTAGRAM fallenflagstudio.com
  8. Kamal Wafi

    tilting screen in unity

    Hi there, i recently start learning unity and im working in my first game , I was wondering if unity had functions to support the motion control effect (tilting screen to move character) you see in doodle jump (which is 2d game) ? If it exists, what are they called? and how it works ? Thanks
  9. For reference I am use Unity as my game engine and the A* Pathfinding Project for path finding as there is no chance I would be able to create anything close to as performant as that in any reasonable amount of time. So I am looking to build a game that is going to have a very similar style as Prison Architect / Rim World / SimAirport / etc. One of the things that I assume is going to effect performance is path finding. Decisions about the game I have already made that I think relate to this are: 1. While I am going to be using Colliders, all of them will be trigger colliders so everything can pass through each other and I will not be use physics for anything else as it has no relevance for my game 2. I am going to want to have a soft cap at the map size being 300x300 (90,000 tiles), I might allow bigger sizes but do something like Rim World does in warning the player about possible side effect (whether it be performance or gameplay) 3. The map will be somewhat dynamic in that the user will be able to build / gather stuff from the map but outside of that, it should not change very much Now I am going to build my game around the idea that users would be in control of no more than 50 pawns at any given time (which is something I can probably enforce through the game play) but I am also going to want to have number other pawns that are AI controlled on the map (NPCs, animals, etc.) that would also need path finding enabled. Now I did a basic test in which I have X number of pawns pick a random location in the 300 x 300 map. move towards it, and then change the location every 3-5 seconds. My initial test was pretty slow (not surprising as I was calculating the path every frame for each pawn) so I decided to cache the calculated path results and only update it ever 2 seconds which got me: 100 pawns: 250 - 450 FPS 150 pawns: 160 - 300 FPS 200 pawns: 90 - 150 FPS 250 pawns: 50 - 100 FPS There is very little extra happening in the game outside of rendering the tilemap. I would imagine the most pawns on the map at a given time that need path finding might be a 1000 (and I would probably be able to make due with like 500 - 600). Now obviously I would not need all the pawn to be calculation paths every 2 seconds nor would they need to be calculating paths that are so long but even at a 5 second path refresh rate and paths that are up to 10 tiles long, I am still only able to get to about 400 pawns before I start to see some big performance issues. The issue with reducing the refresh rate is that there are going to be cases where maybe a wall is built before the pawns path is refreshed having them walk through the wall but not sure if there is a clean way to update the path only when needed. I am sure when I don't run the game in the Unity editor I will see increase performance but I am just trying to figure out what things I could be doing to make sure path finding is as smaller of a performance hit as possible as there is a lot of other simulation stuff I am going to want to run on top of the path finding.
  10. Hi, my name is Roman, and I'm a doing a adventure game inspired by point and click adventure from "Lucas Arts". The adventure game "One helluva day" now has its own page in Steam store. http://store.steampowered.com/app/603680/One_helluva_day Self-centered CEO trying to save his company from bankruptcy forced to rescuing whole town from impending disaster. Description: One helluva day, an old school cartoon point and click adventure with a "Lucas Arts" adventure style In the tradition of "The day of tentacle", and storyline about - One unfortunate day of the life ordinary directors of a small firm, full of mysticism, conspiracies, cults and the end of the world. Screenshots
  11. Hi, this is my first finished game ever. It took my 2 years because Im little bit lazy. Its simple game where you defend the castle agains random spawned enemies. Lots of flying physics objects included :). What do you think? Video Google play link
  12. A 3D mobile (Andriod) game. Sci Fi setting. Puzzle-platformer. Please, somebody, make a some sort of expertise of visual aspect of the game. Just give me Your opinion. Thanks.))
  13. Creativityy Everythingg

    Friday Facts #3

    Hello everyone, this is the third Enchanted Land weekly update. It is scary how fast the week went by. The summer is almost gone. I spent the week fixing the character selection and scripting networking functionality. The bugfixes were mostly finished. In the end I managed to do that on Tuesday night, after a full day of work on fixing small issues:). After the hectic release I spent the next day trying to relax a bit and put plans together for the next iteration. More or less the plan is now clear. There are three priorities: New terrain New main campaign - Having multiple levels. Trailer Ideas . Here is the progress on one of the main scenes: https://www.facebook.com/enchantedlandgame/videos/261398247708592/?modal=admin_todo_tour
  14. Creativityy Everythingg

    Add'em

    Hello, Here I am again with a handful of fresh news from the Enchanted Land back stage. The even better news is that it will be my birthday tomorrow, so there will be a reason to celebrate :). I have some of the interactivity such as adding/deleting friends, etc. programmed. Now I'm going to start programming the messaging system, which users will be able to send images and text.
  15. bencinStudios

    Science Game Jam Weekend Project

    Over the weekend of September 8th and 9th, 2018, our team participated in a Game Jam hosted by the Nashville Game Developers and The Adventure Science Center in Nashville, TN. The event kicked off on Saturday morning with introductions and our challenge for the weekend: create a science-based game with an educational spin. Given that The Adventure Science Center had dedicated September as "Make It Month," creating a video game based on the science of water seemed perfectly in sync with that idea. Through a bit of brainstorming and ideation, we came up with our theme: Water. Water is one of the most interesting substances in the universe with a host of properties and uses. We wanted to use our game to teach about the 3 main phases of water - solid, liquid, and gas. The player would be tasked with navigating a 2D puzzle environment using game mechanics to heat or cool their water character to make it through obstacles and finish the puzzle. Following a ton of online research on water, we all got a little bit smarter about how water acts, what it can do, and why it's such a versatile substance! Now, to make that into some interesting and educational gameplay. We knew we wanted the experience to include the player having to change between the various phases of water to complete the level. The challenge became how to do that in an educational, yet fun way. We decided to utilize the idea of a Bunsen burner to heat the water into a gas to be able to float. We would use a freezer to turn the water into an ice cube to be able to break through obstacles. And we'd use the idea of time and friction to turn the gas or ice back into water to navigate grates in the floor. From there, the team began pulling together assets, coding, and building the game level. By the end of Day 1, you could start to see the results of the team's work. For Day 2, our goal was to put out a finished game that would be fully playable start to finish, while also providing some polished visuals and gameplay. One of the aspects added during Day 2 was our water molecule character, Mo L. Cool, who would serve up interesting facts about water or helpful hints to get the player through the puzzle. Seth, our artist, came up with a very cool, unique take on the water molecule, showing the hydrogen atoms as headphones on the "head" of the oxygen atom. Mo L. Cool would live on the game screen and pop up with info every so often throughout the game, triggered by keys the team placed in the level. By mid-Day 2, we had some Adventure Science Center guests come through to see what we were working on at the Game Jam. We decided it would be a perfect time to get some outside opinions on the game and let them play test the current version of the game. With an Xbox controller in hand, the 2 guests gave the game their best shot while providing us some helpful insights into where we could make adjustments and fixes to make the experience even better. By the end of Day 2, we had our completed prototype game, which we dubbed "Mind Over Matter." While we were able to build a complete game level and experience, there are still a few tweaks we'll be making for the final product. We'll be putting it out on our social channels plus this and other gaming sites for folks to download for free to play (very soon). It was great to see at the end of the weekend what all the other developers at the Game Jam had been working on. Each of them showed off their science-themed gaming creations to the group. Some had been working solo on their project, while others also worked in teams. Everyone had amazingly creative ideas and were able to get completed game experiences built over 2 days. We thoroughly enjoyed ourselves and look forward to future game jams! Here's a gameplay video showing our completed prototype from start to finish (that first part is tricky)! ASC Game Jam 9_17_2018 2_14_17 PM-1(4).mp4
  16. Last week didn't have any particular theme, although it still was a busy one... Statuses First off, all statuses now have effect textures. these are really abstract, but nice to look at. (From left to right: Bleeding, Burning, Damned, Frenzied, Frozen, Knocked Out, Poisoned, Paralyzed and Stunned) Also, I've perfected statuses effects on enemies. Now their current status is a lot more obvious. A nice status icon is displayed over their head to help identify that status. The Diner Secondly, I've added a new room: the diner. The idea of it is quite simple: the diner offers food for the player to eat. The room itself is modelled after classic 50s diners with a jukebox and checkered patterns all over the place. There's even a nice neon sign that is truly aesthetic. The lighting is still a WIP, but the models themselves are pretty much done. There might be some details to add here and there, though... The exterior also needs some work. I was thinking of giving it a huge diner sign, but for now, there's nothing fancy... Crystals Lastly, I've given the player the ability to switch their active crystals. For those who didn't know, crystals are run-persistent collectables that can give the player the opportunity to take shortcuts that gives fame and fortune to whoever chooses to take them. A GUI element is displayed at the bottom of the screen. Within it, there are 3 crystal counters for each type of crystals. When the player switches their active crystal, the element rotates around to display the right counter at the right time. There's even a nice animation for it. I've only worked on this yesterday, so it still has rough edges here and there. Also, there's no discernable way to identify the active type of crystal on the GUI element alone as of yet... There are some icons that could be ready, but I want to try to put those icons in a custom font file. This way, I can use Unity's dynamic text display functionality to have scalable graphics. One of the drawbacks of this is that only monochrome icons can be used... Minor updates Modified the bank so that it spawns with a back wall Fixed bugs with MonoBehaviours scripts presets Fixed a whole lot of bugs with the map generator. Turns out that when the player was extremely lucky, they could remain trapped in the stating room because all other rooms would become secret rooms. Added a limit on how many secrets tunnel rooms can be spawned Added a ceiling to most room obstacles such as locked doors and cracked walls so that the lighting won't look weird anymore. Added back walls to special rooms. Thus, the design of those rooms will be applied continuously rather than abruptly end. Changed the tri-colour decal shader to add emission (mainly used with the diner's neon sign) This week Now that the diner is done, I can go ahead and continue the implementation of even more rooms. Last time I've talked about status-themed rooms, but turns out that there are a lot of other more important rooms to be added beforehand. I will be adding these up progressively... Now that the player knows their current active crystal type and their remaining amount, I can also add rooms dealing with those. I could also try to spawn pickable crystals, but right now rooms seem to be more important than crystals: they add more opportunities and varies the gameplay a lot. And finally, another possibility is to actually create these custom font files I've previously talked about, although it's not that important... Before I forget! Last week I've forgotten to mention that I've also tried to compose some music for the game. Here's a preview: ohok.mp4
  17. A few years ago I started creating a procedural planet engine/renderer for a game in Unity, which after a couple of years I had to stop developing due to lack of time. At the time i didn't know too much about shaders so I did everything on the CPU. Now that I have plenty of time and am more aware of what shaders can do I'd like to resume development with the GPU in mind. For the terrain mesh I'm using a cubed-sphere and chunked LODs. The way I calculate heights is rather complex since it's based on a noise tree, where leaf nodes would be noise generators like Simplex, Value, Sine, Voronoi, etc. and branch nodes would be filters and modifiers (FBM, abs, neg, sum, ridged, billow, blender, selectors, etc). To calculate the heights for a mesh you'd call void CalcHeights( Vector3[] meshVertices, out float[] heights ) on the noise's root node, somewhere in a Unity's script. This approach offers a lot of flexibility but also introduces a lot of load in the CPU. The first obvious thing to do would be (I guess) to move all generators to the GPU via compute shaders, then do the same for the rest of the filters. But, depending on the complexity of the noise tree, a single call to CalcHeights could potentially cause dozens of calls back and forth between the CPU and GPU, which I'm not sure it's a good thing. How should I go about this? Thanks.
  18. While we work up to the final small project, we will be publishing assets that will be used in our Game. We have finished uploading the texture pack to our server and made it available to Epic Games. Unity has a version of our Texture pack as well. Just waiting for the final approvals and they should be available for purchase. Each texture is a complete specular PBR set and comes in resolutions of 2k, 1k, 512 and 256. Created the materials to go along with our texture sets including a example of panning water and how to make the water any color. The look is pretty cool, but will be adding Gershner wave and inputs for wind direction and speed in the near future.
  19. Do heavily-loaded compute shaders affect the performance of the other "normal/render" shaders? or do they use a dedicated core?
  20. GamesByNama

    [Android][Free] 2 Play

    Hey there!2 Play is a collection of 8 GAMES for 2 players in a local multiplayer on one device (split-screen)!They are all from different genres like racing, maze, arcade, reaction, mind games, ... so there is a game for everyone among them!Get it here for free: https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.Gamesbynama.ToPlayThe games are all easy to understand but can really challenge the two players competing against each other. The games are great to kill boredom (e.g. while waiting) or just to have fun together!HAVE FUN!
  21. Making games is hard. You need all kinds of technical and creative skills, you need a big team, a budget... But making your first game can be even more difficult if you have no previous experience in game development and your team is only two people. But it didn't stop us. We quit our jobs and started this indie game journey full of mistakes and pitfalls. Why? What encouraged us to make this stupid move? Inspired by Extra Credits, Hellblade Dev Diaries, and ThinMatrix we decided to start a weekly behind the scenes show. There we'll be showing bits of our production process. The whole project is a huge and risky experiment for us and we would love to hear your support and recommendations. We are opened to all sorts of feedback. Even if you consider something is of a low quality in our video, please let us know it as is. We would love to learn from the community and improve. Thank you.
  22. Greetings fellow gaming enthusiasts! I am the Product Manager for a VR game called Funny Farm VR. https://www.funnyfarmvr.com/ We have already have a proof of concept build of the game that is published on iOS, Android, Oculus Rift, Oculus Go, GearVR, Pico and Niburu platforms. Not a bad start eh? It's a 3D VR game built on the Unity platform. We are now looking to further develop the game concept and build on what we have to achieve the following: Introduce a game economy (power ups / rewards / currency) Add more levels We need 1 or 2 developers with experience in developing on the Unity 3D platform as well as a 3D artist and animator. This is a great opportunity to work on a fun game and inject your own ideas / personality into it. If you're interested in getting involved drop me a message and I'll get in touch. Looking forward to putting a team together! Liam
  23. Hi, I`m developing a fantasy RPG / card game. Game is already quite far, but still some help is needed for the final push. It´s kind of hybrid between a RPG and a card game with leveling and skills and tactical combat on square grid. Those who are familiar with Gloomhaven board game and Card Hunter PC game should get the idea. We`re using Unity so that is a requirement and multiplayer knowledge is a huge plus. Game is targeted mainly for mobile platforms and for semi casual playing. Think Clash Royale with turn based combat..
  24. Hi everyone, I'm creating a series of tutorials about the creation of Game Effects in Unity. I hope it may help someone around here, and feel free to ask questions. Thanks & Enjoy!
  25. Hi everyone! So, I have this rather complex Unity project, I've been working on for the past months. So I will try to narrow it down to only the most relevant parts. The game's core is pretty much your standard space sim, meaning you're flying your spacecraft through open space. To do that, I have a "Player" GameObject in the scene's root. The Player has a Rigidbody (3D) attached, and a simple box collider. And it has two child objects: One is the actual ship (incl. meshes, etc.) to be used for the simulation and outside camera views. The other is the cockpit (also containing meshes) to be rendered on top of the main camera's image by another camera. The ship is then moved by applying force (and torque) to the Rigidbody. So far, everything seemed to work smoothly. But I discovered, that if a coordinate exceeds about 20k on any axis, I get a very visible stutter/jitter in the cockpit. Will I really have to re-scale my whole game into miniature wonderland or did I overlook something? It might be important to note, that as soon as I get the jitter, I can make it worse by changing course in any direction. Also, returning to my starting point (thus, putting coords into "working parameters" again) won't cancel the jitter. Neither flying back nor setting the coords by script will help. Any idea will be much appreciated. Thank you very much
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