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Found 500 results

  1. TheAGamer39

    A Dev Team Needed

    Hi, I'm currently working on this game by myself and was wondering if anyone wanted to help I'm looking for programmers, illustrators, pixel artists, sound designers and developers. I'm a young teen and I prefer to program, I have a basic idea for the game but need help creating it and giving it some more uniqueness. Basically the game is a 2D, could be 3D if someone can teach me how to code games in 3D, and a large world adventure game were you have to fight monsters to level up and collect increasingly powerful items . There is also going to be a mysterious part of the game where you have to find certain artefacts and decode messages to get the best gear. I really hope people are interested please join my discord server: https://discord.gg/c5Ce9Q4 or contact me via email; theagamer39@hotmail.com if you want to help. Hope you have a nice day!
  2. AlienplayGames

    Spin! has been released!

    Hey everyone! Spin! has been released and you can try it out! It's available here: https://www.kongregate.com/games/Alienplay/spin https://www.newgrounds.com/portal/view/740043 https://alienplay.itch.io/spin https://gamejolt.com/games/falling-ball/438641 Can't wait to hear what you think about it! Any feedback is greatly appreciated!
  3. In PixelCast 7, Jeremy hangs out at Pixels = Pints + Bytes for the latest PixelFest Devs meetup and chats with two local indies about their studios. Joshua Jané demos 'Bouncy Bear' and explains what makes 'Just Bare Games' tick, including the fact that all their games contain bears! Meanwhile, Joseph Musso of Sunset Studios let's us in on the game he's been pondering for 10 years ('Santa's Sleigh Ride Sacrilegious Arcade Action'... say it three times fast), which is now playable after coming out to a PixelFest Devs meetup back in August. View full story
  4. In PixelCast 7, Jeremy hangs out at Pixels = Pints + Bytes for the latest PixelFest Devs meetup and chats with two local indies about their studios. Joshua Jané demos 'Bouncy Bear' and explains what makes 'Just Bare Games' tick, including the fact that all their games contain bears! Meanwhile, Joseph Musso of Sunset Studios let's us in on the game he's been pondering for 10 years ('Santa's Sleigh Ride Sacrilegious Arcade Action'... say it three times fast), which is now playable after coming out to a PixelFest Devs meetup back in August.
  5. I want to render an ocean where players can change waves’ amplitude in real-time. Initially, I would render rolling waves (see picture). As the amplitude increases, I need to transition the rolling waves into breaking waves (see picture). For now, I am not going to show the shoreline onscreen so I don’t need to render breaking waves interacting with the shoreline; I only need breaking waves on the open ocean. I’ve tried three different approaches so far and I’ve only had success with rolling waves using approach 1. Breaking waves have been impossible so far with all three approaches. Approach 1: Mesh deformation a. I can create smooth rolling waves using the Sine and Gerstner equations. b. Since I can’t use these equations for breaking waves, I tried to implement them by using this free plugin whose output is similar to this paid mesh deformation plugin. But there are 2 problems with this plugin approach: · There is no smooth transition between rolling waves generated by approach 1a and the breaking waves generated by the Deform plugin · The output of the plugin does not look similar to real breaking ocean waves in three different ways: i. No smooth blending with the ocean surface ii. A large depression is created below the crest iii. The entire wave is the same height (rather than with more realistic variations) c. I considered using vertex shaders but this approach seems similar to mesh deformation. Approach 2: Fluid dynamics + metaballs 1. To render an ocean I will need thousands of particles which will be too expensive in terms of performance (especially for mobile devices). Approach 3: Using mesh files 1. I can create breaking waves using some 3D software like in this post but then I can’t modify the ocean in real-time. It will be more like a pre-rendered simulation. To summarize, I am looking for an approach where I can vary ocean waves’ amplitude for a smooth transition between rolling waves and breaking waves. Please let me know if you have more questions.
  6. [The original post with its original format can be found here] Players want to play, they don't want to wait. Help them buying your game: reduce your game's download size with Unity Addressables Hosting. And a year later? Offer them a DLC based on, guess what? Addressables. Picture your potential player on a Friday afternoon. Your player has just left behind a hard week with long working hours. Their wife or husband is gone to their family's country house for the weekend along with the kids. The perfect time to go home, order pizza and browse through Steam with the wallet at hand. With or without kids, with or without partner, we all had these awesome weekends. Just videogames, please. So your player comes across your newly released game in the Steam shop. They see all the effort you put into creating polished content. No need for convincing, they hand in their credit card details and buy two copies of your game. One for theirself, another for their friend / brother / sister. You get your 19.95 bucks, twice. Both users happily start installing the game. But wait... A wild Steam installation pop-up appears. The remaining installation time suddenly exploded to 12 hours What, 12 hours for over 30GB? What the #*@! is in this game? I'm not wasting my weekend on this shit, I'm out! What happens afterward is not uncommon. Your ex-player requests a full refund and purchase instead the next game in their wish-list. One of the pain points for players is the waiting time wasted on downloading all the bytes of the whole game and start playing. People do not have that much time. Nothing will burn a hole in your wallet faster than an angry player. Do you need to include in your installation package all these assets that are spawned in the level 5 of your game? Chances are, you don't. Players will need a couple of hours to play through the initial content of your game. Use that to your advantage The idea is simple. Provide the minimum content possible in your game installation package and download the rest while playing the initial levels of your game. Can you picture your player ready to play in a mere minute after purchasing your game? How different would the reviews be compared to the ones commonly found with huge games? Ideally, your game's download size should be below 100MB. But how? This is what you will get by the time you're done implementing the information of this article: Ridiculously tiny installation sizes A new Amazon S3 bucket to host your content online Upload Unity Addressable Assets to S3 through the Unity Editor Download the Unity Addressable Assets from the S3 bucket in your player builds A high-five from your happy players Fox / Via mashable.com Level 1 Developer: "Storage is cheap, anyway" We started developing our game a few months ago and we have big plans for it. You and I worked endless hours into creating highly polished content. Not only that, we saw some great offers in the Unity Asset Store, so we bought several asset packs at heavily discounted prices. Now our game is full of content our players will love to play through. Those Sci-Fi modular parts, the exploding particle systems, the punchy soundtrack. It's all gorgeous. And heavy. And slow to download. Now your Android APK is well over 2GB, so you need to start messing with expansion files, which adds another good week to your efforts. But it's fine, we all have time here. Or maybe you're publishing on Steam, so you can be at 30 GB, no problem. You just need a few hours for uploading it. And players? It's ok, people have a fast connection nowadays. So we released our game. Some players reported some bugs, so we make a 5-minute fix and we go through all the long process again. Build, wait for hours, upload to stores, wait for hours. And our players? They just re-download the whole thing again. Wait for hours, then start playing. It's not a big deal. Only that you are not recovering all the time you wasted on this previously. And a great deal of your players will stop downloading your game once they see how many hours they have to wait. That only gets worse with each update. Did I mention refunds? We can do better than this, now that we have the tools. Let's upgrade our skills to Level-2. Level 2 Developer: Unity Addressables Hosting Welcome to Unity Addressables. This package will allow you to efficiently manage your game assets. That, my friend, includes online distribution. For an introduction on this topic, visit my previous article on Unity Addressables Benefits for your game. These are the steps you and I will be following in the article: Set up an Amazon S3 Bucket for online distribution Mark our content as Unity Addressable Assets for online distribution Upload our content to the cloud Profit from tiny installation sizes (and others) Like granny said, a 2D sprite is worth a thousand times: Unity Addressables Hosting with Amazon S3 - Steps Let's start with... 1. Setting Up a Free Amazon S3 Bucket It's our lucky day. Amazon offers a free tier for their S3 service. That means, we're going to host our content for free. The limitations for their free tier is mostly storage space and the number data transfers. At the moment of writing this, you can store for free up 5GB and perform 20,000 GET and 2,000 PUT requests, but do double check it in the official site of AWS Free Tiers. What we are going to do here is to create an account for AWS so we are ready to upload our game content for further distribution. You and I will do this as fast as possible. No need to waste time in detail. No BS. Setting up Amazon S3 Hosting for Unity Addressables 1.1. Create AWS account Navigate to the AWS Management Console and click on Create a Free Account. Enter your e-mail and bla bla bla. That will take you roughly a minute. Be aware that you'll need to give them your credit card info to verify your identity. 1.2. Choose AWS Plan Unless you're going pro right from the start, we want to evaluate this in our game first. So, after confirming your account, choose the basic plan. 1.3. Create your first S3 bucket After a few minutes, your account will be activated (you'll get an e-mail). Then, sign in to your new console and open the S3 service panel: You are now located at the S3 control panel. Now we are ready to create the bucket like shown below (change your bucket name and region!): Leave the permissions set to public for now, you'll have the chance to tweak them in the future. Your S3 bucket for Unity Addressables is now ready, congratulations! That was the most tedious step. The next step is a piece of cake: time to get your Unity Project to produce downloadable assets. Summary: Use the AWS Management Console to create a Free Tier S3 Bucket For starting, assign public permissions to your S3 Bucket Alternatively, use another storage service based on the spreadsheet in the Resources Pack 2. Unity Addressable Assets for Distribution Finally, we made it to Unity. That whole S3 process was getting old. I will assume you have some content marked as Addressable in your game. If that's not the case because you are new to this, don't worry, I have you covered with the previous Unity Addressables Tutorial I wrote. I'll show you the steps to get content uploaded in your newly created AWS S3 Bucket. We will do so based on a project I created for this purpose. Instead of following the whole story, you can also skip the line, get access to the code now and read later. Unity Addressables - Profile Settings A. Addressables Profile Configuration The way to start is to tell Unity where to load remote assets from. That we achieve by tweaking our Addressables Profile Configuration. In the Addressables main window, click on: Profile: Default → Inspect Profile Settings. This will redirect you to the settings we need to tweak. Here is a collection of funny toys you can play with, but for our purposes we just need to focus on the Profiles section. We want to make sure we set the Addressables RemoteLoadPath field to the correct URL. We form the RemoteLoadPath URL by concatenating our S3 Bucket URL with the Unity variable [BuildTarget], like below: https://YOUR-BUCKET-NAME.s3.YOUR-REGION-NAME.amazonaws.com/[BuildTarget] E.g. https://thegamedevguru.s3.eu-central-1.amazonaws.com/[BuildTarget] The [BuildTarget] variable is left on purpose so Unity fetches in run-time the right assets for each of the platforms we build for. Android assets will be packed differently from Standalone, so each of these platforms will require a different directory. The way I found my S3 Bucket URL is by uploading a random file; if you then navigate to its details, you'll see the base URL of your file and hence your bucket. B. Addressable Asset Groups Configuration So, we just told Unity where to load the remote assets from through the RemoteLoadPath variable. Great. What is left is to tell which assets should be loaded remotely. Easy. Go over the heavy assets you want to be downloaded remotely and mark these Assets as Addressable. In our case, it's the skybox materials. Open the Unity Addressables Window and assign these assets to Addressable Asset Groups. If you are just starting with Addressables, assign them to a single group for now; e.g. Skyboxes. Eventually, you'll want them to be grouped in a way that makes sense (check my Level-3 guide on Unity Addressables Tutorial for more info). Navigate to the Addressables Group inspector settings by clicking on the group and make the following adjustments: BuildPath is set to RemoteBuildPath LoadPath is set to RemoteLoadPath You can see a graphical breakdown of this entire process below. Asset Groups for Unity Addressables Hosting Unity Addressable Asset Group Settings for Network Delivery We now have our skybox content assigned to a group that will be downloaded by your players in run-time. Summary Set RemoteLoadPath to the base URL of your web hosting provider Append the [BuildTarget] variable into RemoteLoadPath to differentiate multiple platforms Assign your Unity Addressable Assets to a group and tweak its settings to use the remote paths so it'll be downloaded from your web hosting provider 3. Uploading Content to Amazon S3 All our settings are now in place. What about uploading our content to S3? This is a simple two-step process: Build player content. Upload it to S3. Building Addressables Player Content is straightforward. Open the Addressables main window and press the button that does just that. This will cook the assets for the current platform your editor is in. Unity Addressables: Build Player Content The output content will be stored in the path dictated by the RemoteBuildPath variable you happened to see early in the Unity Addressables Profile Settings. If you didn't modify it, it's likely to be in a subfolder of your project called ServerData. The second step involves navigating to that directory and dropping its contents into the website of your S3 bucket, as you can see just below: Unity-Addressable Assets - Upload to S3 There you have it, it's that simple. However, this can quickly become tedious. It's a very manual task that could easily be automated. I did just that so now uploading all my assets takes the press of a button inside Unity Editor. To upload your Unity Addressable Assets directly from the Unity Editor, check my Unity Addressables Hosting Resource Pack at the end of the article. 4. Downloading Assets from Amazon S3 This is the part we all were waiting for. You now have a game you can distribute that is significantly smaller. The remaining part is launching it and watching it download the assets on demand! If you want to make sure these assets are being effectively downloaded, delete the data from your S3 Bucket, disable the caching option in your Addressable Asset Group Settings, rebuild the content and your player. If you launch it, you should see a few error messages pop up, as you can see below. Unity Addressable Assets Download Error If you followed this tutorial on Unity Addressables Hosting, chances are, you will be totally alright By now, the asset groups you marked to be remotely downloaded are hosted in S3 and Unity knows how to fetch them. The Gamedev Guru's S3 Upload Tool Level 3 Developer: Unity Addressables Hosting Resource Pack By now you should have your first Unity Addressables Hosting experiment up and running. You learned how to build player content specifically to target downloadable content. That's great, but there's more than just the basics. To help you further, I prepared a Free Unity Addressables Hosting Resource Pack just for you. This bundle contains: A spreadsheet comparing different hosting alternatives to the pricey S3 An extension to upload your Unity Addressable Asset to Amazon S3 directly from the Editor The source code of this project; see it for yourself Newsletter access with exclusive free content Level up your skills. Download your free Resource Pack now.
  7. Our team at Darkstar Games is looking for some motivated developers to join our new TCG MMORPG game called "Greater Powers". We are previewing KS for Q1 2020 and are set to create a unique and epic videogame ! Our team members work for corporate equity (corporate shares). Every team member who has shown active participation is granted stock option in the corporation. And Department directors will be distributing cash bonuses to team members who contribute significantly to the project during development. Skillset especially needed: -> Concept artist -> Rigger -> Animator -> C# programming -> Graphic design -> 3D modeling (especially for structures, creatures and skyships) -> Good knowledges level in Unity3D If you're looking to join in on an up and coming original game company send me your Portfolio to: flosambora123@gmail.com Hope to hear from you soon ! https://www.facebook.com/DarkstarGamesCorp/
  8. RoKabium Games

    Customization build items

    From the album: SAMA

    Each upgrade shows the amount of items and energy needed to build that component. This number of items will count down as you find more resources while mining. A green tick means you have enough items of a specific kind required for that upgrade. When you have all resources needed to build a specific upgrade a yellow dot in the top right corner of the icon will appear.
  9. intenscia

    PC Cross Platform Mod API & SDK

    mod.io is an cross platform mod service created by the team behind ModDB.com and IndieDB.com. It can be integrated in-game using the REST API, C/C++ SDK or engine plugins (if available) Unity and Unreal Engine are ready to use with other engine plugins in development. Features include: Platform agnostic (support 1 click mod installs on Steam, Epic Games Store, Discord, GOG, itch.io and even consoles in the future) Clientless (mod.io has no other dependencies and works behind the scenes in your game) Embeddable web app UI, so you can integrate your mod community anywhere Powerful search, filtering and tagging of mods Moderation and reporting systems built-in Steps to getting mod.io integrated: Add your game to our test environment or production Read our API documentation for an overview of how mod.io works Choose an Engine Plugin, API or SDK to integrate mod.io into your game and mod making tools Ready to launch? Add your game to our production environment then let's discuss promoting your release Need help? Our team is available on Discord to assist and our getting started guide has more information for you Benefits of using mod.io: mod.io offers the same core functionality as Steamworks Workshop (1 click mod installs in-game), plus mod hosting, moderation and all of the critical pieces needed. Where we differ is our approach to modding and the flexibility a REST API offers. For example: Our API is not dependent on a client or SDK, allowing you to run mod.io in many places such as your homepage and launchers Designing a good mod browsing UI is hard, our plugins ship with a UI built in to save you a lot of effort and help your mods stand out We don’t apply rules globally, so if you want to enable patronage, sales or other experimental features, reach out to discuss Our platform is built by the super experienced ModDB.com team and is continually improving for your benefit Your community can consume the mod.io API to build modding fan sites or discord bots if they want Large studios and publishers: A private white label option is available to license, if you want a fully featured mod-platform that you can control and host in-house. Contact us to discuss. Find out more: Visit mod.io | About us | Add your game | Chat on Discord These screenshots are from our Unity plugin:
  10. XenahE

    Scrolling Parallax

    Hi there, I am new to this forum and wanted to say hi first of all. Secondly, I am in the process of creating a vertical 2d shooter using the assets I am creating on photoshop and illustrator. I want to put a scrolling parallax in the background to give the illusion that the player is moving forward (similar to Skyforce Anniversary) but I am not sure how best to create the graphics in terms of the document size etc. I have used a scrolling parallax before using a 3D game object in unity and wrapping a background to it. This works fine for a repeating background but I would like mine to change throughout the level. Has anyone got any experience with doing something like this? Thanks in advance Xe
  11. Devlog #3- Monsters and Mythos! October 15th, 2019 Connect with us on Social Media: Facebook: www.facebook.com/TumultuousProductions Twitter: https://twitter.com/TumultuousGame Join our Discord Server: Join the Yami Discord Want to Join the Project? Fill out our google forms Online Application For more about the Studio : About Us Tumultuous Productions Check out our website for Yami! https://tumultuousproductions.site/index2.html For more about Yami: Our Game: Yami Weekly Updates Week 3: More Creatures within Kinfallen Forest Here is a showcase of two more enemies you will encounter in the Kinfallen Forest, including a brief description and concept art created by our talented artists: Scavenger: Thought by some to be corrupted descendants of those lost within Kinfallen Forest, the scavenger hunts for trinkets and valuables scattered along the undergrowth of the forest. It carries its belongings in an overstuffed satchel upon its back, clinging to the past memories these items possess. When spotted, they will back away and only attack when threatened, but will become emboldened when other members of its kind are nearby. Uprooter: A subterranean creature of the forest, the uprooter dwells mainly within the vast root system of Kinfallen Forest, digging burrows and creating mounds of soil. Its nose resembles a forest flower, tricking passersby into a sense of security. When a traveler encroaches on its territory, it will jump out of the ground and attack with its powerful claws, sometimes throwing mounds of dirt and rock in defense. Weekly Member Spotlight: This week, I metaphorically ‘sat down’ with Arabesco, one of our artists on the team and an incredibly talented pixel-art animator. I asked her about her process and working style to produce such amazing animations for Yami. Thanks again to Arabesco for answering our questions! Q: What is your artistic background? A: “I began my journey into art very early on - I was around 2 when my cousin drew a cat on paper. Enchanted by the idea of creating something in paper, I decided to learn how to draw. Eventually I began to draw digitally as well and thus became fascinated with the idea of making artwork for a game. For now I am doing Visual Arts as a major in college and will possibly get a minor in graphic design.” Q: How did you get inspired to make art for a video game? A: “When I was 14 or so, I found out that people could make their own games relatively easily and publish them in the internet. The catch was that you needed to make your art yourself. I did not know about sites that let you use their material for free. So I decided to do game art and thus live and learn, reading pixel art articles and whatnot as well as staring at spritesheets while figuring out how do The Experts do it.” Q: How do you animate your art? A: “When it comes to pixel art, I use an approach that to an extent is similar to rigging/puppeteering: putting the moving parts in their layers and moving them with edits to maintain consistency. This allows for a faster workflow. Outside of it I tend to do hand drawn animations in krita.” Q: Tell us briefly about yourself! A: “I am an individual. Living in some south american country, close to the sea, I often either work on the many things I have or just stand there. Menacingly.” Q: What is your process for making art? A: “I first have an idea. Then I try to think of the many ways to approach said idea. Then I materialize the concept. Once I feel it is satisfactory, I put it out.” ~Look for our post Next week where we show concepts for the Yami planet of Raum, and concept art for one of our NPCs~ Check out our new Website: https://tumultuousproductions.site/index2.html Remember to: Connect with us on Social Media: Facebook: www.facebook.com/TumultuousProductions Twitter: https://twitter.com/TumultuousGame Join our Discord Server: Join the Yami Discord Want to Join the Project? Fill out our google forms Online Application For more about the Studio : About Us Tumultuous Productions Check out our website for Yami! https://tumultuousproductions.site/index2.html For more about Yami: Our Game: Yami
  12. We are a team of passionate developers! We are looking for people who want to make their first game or developing as a hobby. Our goal is to practice making games together and learn on the way! And eventually be a great game development group! We already got the basics for our game! Link to a review of the game: Link to a review of our game (we don’t have a modeller yet, that’s why the game doesn’t looks well) Explanation of the game will be found in the #game-design channel Non profit (At least for now) We mostly need 3D modellers but anything else will also be great! This is our discord: Link to our discord server If the link expires, you can contact me in discord: Cringey Boy#1615
  13. I always liked playing both Mario Kart (the most was on DS) and Crash Team Racing. There's just something fascinating with the mechanics of the game. I could play it endlessly, despite a small number of different circuits. Actually I like racers in general. Two years ago I made a racer looking like Outrun, which is another type of game which I loved as a child (at a time where games didn't yet have a defined standard, so it was OK to just play to hit the road and explore environments, without princess to save, big boss or other deadly stake). Link: https://itunes.apple.com/us/app/highway-runners/id964932741?mt=8 But still, back to Crash Team Racing, I always wanted to make my own clone for fun, and I gave up due to lacking physics knowledge (and free time). This remained a dream though, and this time I committed to it harder, and learned, fiddled with every concept until I grasped it. It started with an inspiring video about Space Dust Racing. I think that's the one mentioned everywhere when it comes to developing an arcade racer. I think I kinda knew that it was lacking a lot of concepts that I'd eventually have to fiddle with, but many people were saying that the theory was alright, so I started. I also created a topic, which I'll now turn to a blog: Anyway as with many things the very hard part was the beginning. It's amazing when I think about how at first I was unsure about everything. About how I had to swallow my ego and realize that I wasn't able to implement a simple spring correctly, or to understand the true implications. Well I can say that I still don't truly understand everything, but it's enough to get what my car does and make it do what I want so so this blog may just start with a common and sweet "Believe in yourself" claim I hope to develop it into a fully playable game (homebrew quality though), focusing on the mechanics, and detail here some specific algorithmic areas. I'm not sure yet of the final form, maybe I'll want to get as close to the CTR as possible. Maybe I'll go for something else and think about special challenges that I could bring to the table. Here's how it looks for now Not playable demo yet, but feel free to leave your impressions, suggestions, and anything that you'd like to see in such a project CarGame-v2.mp4