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Found 7 results

  1. In this article, 3D Environment Artist Aditya Rajani goes in-depth in how he created a Ferrari Formula 1 car in 3D using Maya and Quixel. He shared insights on how to avoid some common mistakes while modeling and texturing and achieve realistic results. Background Aditya Rajani is a widely renowned 3D Environment Artist who has made significant contributions to numerous award-winning video games and applications for virtual reality (VR), console and mobile platforms with companies including Warner Bros. Games, Survios, and Ten O’ Six Productions. His work can be seen on some of the most critically acclaimed releases like CREED: Rise to Glory, a 2019 nominee for the VR Awards “Game of the Year”. He also lent his talents to the upcoming pirate simulator Battlewake for PlayStation VR, Oculus Rift and HTC VIVE. Other major achievements of Mr. Rajani include his work with Tiered World Studios on a STEM- themed mobile education application for children. As one of the project’s Lead 3D Artist and Designers, Rajani helped bring to life the characters and environment integral to the game which introduces young learners to art, innovation and entrepreneurship. Breakdown Step 1: References Formula 1 car is a complex machine. The sheer technical aspect of constructing a Formula 1 car is immense. Weight Distribution, Aerodynamics, Engine Power, Hydraulics, Downforce - all these factors change the complexion of the game. And so, to build a Formula 1 car in 3D, collecting reference images is key. It comprises of so many little parts, that having a few good reference images can really help push the realism further. There are several websites where you can grab reference images from - google, pinterest and most important - blueprints.com. To match the photorealistic aspect of a real F1 car, having orthographic views of a previous model is extremely important. With the help of the front, top and side view images, you can trace the car with the exact size and scale just like a real-world car. Step 2: Modeling/UV unwrapping Once you match the overall size and shape with the references, then you can start adding more details to the model by way of subD modeling i.e, by adding subdivisions/edge loops. It's important to stress that by adding too many unnecessary edge loops, the model can become quite high poly fairly quickly and practically unusable. One quick tip that I wanted to share is that with models like cars or other vehicles and weapons, there are so many little objects and keeping track of them can be a bit of a headache. Naming them appropriately can go a long way in saving you time later down the line. It's fair to assume that naming objects is something that can be completely overlooked while modeling or grouping objects, but by developing a habit to name those, it'll save you precious time which can be focused on other tasks. It's also important to plan ahead by looking at textures before you add details. In this case, since the car had different colors on the same part of the mesh (red/white patches), I made the faces/edges follow the color pattern so I can quickly mask it by assigning a material ID to it. Little things like these will save you a lot of time and often times, fixing it later will cost you more time and effort than recreating it so having that awareness can help you grow as an artist. Step 3: Texturing Texturing is the most fun part for me. It's like a puzzle - trying to piece everything together. An average looking model can look great with the help of awesome textures but a great looking model can get ruined by mediocre looking textures. Establishing proper surface depth of materials is extremely important as it's the first thing people see when they look at a model. Adding small surface details like roughness variation, grunge, dirt, oil leaks, grease etc. can convey a lot of information and storytelling like how old a model is, what type of environment it was exposed to, whether that place is old or new, what type of weather an object went through etc. By adding details via textures, these questions can be answered automatically and gives the environment/object strong personality. For texturing this car, I used a combination of Quixel Suite and Substance Painter. I feel like both tools can be used to your advantage. Since there were a lot of sponsor logos that I had to put on, Substance Painter was the superior choice because of its easy interface. Quixel had a lot of good metal smart materials in their library at the time so I used it for texturing the main body. When using logos, it's important to make sure that the resolution is set to very high (at least 600 dpi), else the edges might appear jagged and can look very ugly. For adding normal wear and tear to a model in Substance Painter, smart masks can be a great starting point but it's important to not rely on them too much. It can look really robotic and rigid. For adding things like rust, studying an object that you're making can be really beneficial too. For example, if you're making a helmet, find reference images of a helmet exposed to natural surroundings and study the effects it has on it. If it's a place where it rains a lot, and the helmet was lying on the ground for years, then it's going to have even more wear and tear than usual. Pay close attention to the direction of the rust and try to replicate that on your 3D object. Step 4: Rendering Lighting and Rendering plays a vital role in presentation. It's essential to spend enough time presenting your work on your portfolio by choosing different camera angles that are pleasing to the eye. With the help of Marmoset Toolbag, it takes only a few mins to present high quality work thanks to its real-time rendering capabilities. For this project, I'm just using one directional light and an HDRI. For post-processing, I played around with Brightness, Contrast, Exposure and Gamma values until I was happy with the result. Showcasing how your model looks under different lighting conditions is also a good idea. Turntables can be quite effective in presenting the models in real-time. Breaking down your render shots shows an insight into your process and highlights different stages of production. It's always good to post different types of screenshots like AO only, Grayscale only and Wireframe to break it down further.
  2. GrumpySam

    Vehicle Milestone Reached

    We have a brand spanking new build to mess around in. The latest improvements are that the Bomber plane has been added to the game. This means that we have all 4 vehicles that we need for the alpha! Now we just need to balance the heck out of them. On the table this week is a retrospective on the plane flight model up until now. In the video below are clips of the attack plane in the various build version. Build 0.02 was mid May and the latest build 0.05 is a few hours old. Builds 0.03 and 0.04 are obviously in between. 0.02 is where the proof of concept that the flight model works. The main fault is that during tight turns the camera can get stuck pointing backwards which almost certainly leads to a crash. 0.03 fixes the camera problem, you can now bank as hard as you want without making the camera view go all nutty. There plane’s turn radius is too large, and it doesn’t climb well enough. It takes too long to do another gun run on targets, and banking hard makes you lose a lot of height. 0.04 improves turning and climb rates. But still not enough. 0.05 Speed is lowered, which automatically makes it easier to turn. Tweaks to maneuverability have been made. The plane doesn’t climb as well as before, though (due to the lower speed). Combat characteristics of the planes haven’t been prioritised yet. And the flight model will be tweaked throughout development. Next on the table are more tweaks to the camera so it doesn’t clip through terrain. The helicopter flight controls are being refined. We are currently unsure if we should improve the current design, or switch to a new type of flight model for the helicopter. Further testing, especially with beginner players will be key to deciding the proper path. As per usual. Level design, audio, and other such stuff is also in the works in the background. The bomber plane is currently wickedly tough (watch to the end to find out why) Blog: Website (badbunch.net), Gamedev.net (https://bit.ly/2XlfZhU), and IndieDB (https://bit.ly/2ZAMCps). Twitter: (https://twitter.com/BunchBad) Discord: (https://discord.gg/8KQuC9) End
  3. Antonio Schwuchow

    Second post - Lots of content already made

    The idea is that this "bochos" (more car pardoys in the future) come and hit you, you can loose passengers so you earn less money. From time to time, the bus arrives to the bus stop to refill with passengers. Basically thats it. I think it looks cute on that screenshot. The game is designed for a portrait view on your phone: Icons and fonts are based on the originals from Mexico Citi´s subway system. Im still experimenting with the camera view and perspective style. Now a sneak peak of the "vapor" mode:
  4. This whitepaper was originally posted on the Unreal Engine Blog bySebastien Miglio at https://unrealengine.com/en-US/blog/create-photoreal-car-windows-in-unreal-engine. The original whitepaper by Min Jie Wu and edited by Robb Surridge is available for download at here. Republished with permission. Automotive glass can be a particularly challenging element for real-time automotive rendering. In the real world, car windows involve a complex interplay of light as it passes through multiple layers of material with different physical properties. These results can be difficult to imitate in a real-time renderer, while achieving an acceptable balance between physical realism and a fast enough frame rate. And to make things even more difficult, the windows of a car naturally attract the viewer’s attention — especially the windshield. Any unrealistic artifacts or reflections can easily destroy the overall effect of an otherwise high-quality rendering. This paper describes an approach to designing windshields in Unreal Engine 4 that delivers photoreal results in real time. See the results of this technique in the award-winning short film, The Human Race: Mesh Structure This technique begins with the way the windshield is modeled. The windshield needs to be made up of four independent meshes or mesh groups. Each of these four meshes needs to be single-sided. The following diagram summarizes the layout of the meshes: Figure 1: Mesh layout There are two outer layers of the windshield, Mesh 1 and Mesh 2, that have their normals pointing outward toward the exterior of the vehicle. These are represented by the red and yellow lines. There are two inner layers, Mesh 3 and Mesh 4, that have their normals pointing inward toward the inside of the vehicle. These are represented by the green and blue lines. This detail view shows how these four meshes are arranged with respect to each other in 3D space: Figure 2: Mesh arrangement in 3D space Mesh 1, the exterior reflective layer, forms the outer skin of the windshield. It will provide the reflections that you see from outside the vehicle. Its normals point outward from the vehicle. Figure 3: Mesh highlighted in orange At a distance of half the windshield’s total thickness, you have Mesh 2, the outer tint layer. When you look at the windshield from the outside, this layer tints your view of the inside of the car according to the color of the glass. Its normals also point outward, in the same direction as Mesh 1. Figure 4: Mesh 2 highlighted in orange Figure 5: Mesh 3 highlighted in orange Back to back with Mesh 2, you have Mesh 3, the inner tint layer. When you look out through the windshield from inside the car, this layer tints your view of the outside surroundings according to the color of the glass. Its normals point inward. Figure 6: Mesh 4 highlighted in orange Finally, at the innermost extent of the windshield, Mesh 4 provides the reflections of the interior of the car that you see when looking out from the inside. Its normals point inward. The following image shows the Static Mesh Actors for these four meshes in the World Outliner in the Unreal Editor: Figure 8: Static Mesh Actors in the World Outliner Below, all four layers are shown in the viewport of the Unreal Editor, in wireframe and lit modes: Figure 9: Four layers in the viewport Material Design This technique requires two different translucent Materials: A reflective Material, which you’ll apply to the exterior and interior surfaces of the windshield. A tint Material, whose only job is to color the things that you see through the glass. Material 1: Reflective The goal of this Material is to handle only the light that gets reflected off the glass. We want this layer of the windshield to be fully transparent when we look at it straight on, but very reflective when we look at it at a grazing angle. To model this in Unreal Engine, we need to start with a translucent Material. When you select your Material’s output node in the Material Editor, set the following values in the Details panel: Set the Blend Mode to Translucent. Set the Lighting Mode to Surface TransparencyVolume. Enable Screen Space Reflections. Figure 10: Details panel in the Material Editor for the reflective Material In the Material’s graph, we set it up as a mirrorlike chrome, but we also tie its opacity to the camera’s viewing angle using the Fresnel node. Make the Base Color white. Set the Metallic and Specular inputs to 1.0. Set the Roughness input to 0.0. Ordinarily, a white, perfectly reflective, and perfectly metallic surface would have the appearance of smooth chrome. However, we also attach the Fresnel node to the Opacity input of the material’s output node. This makes those crisp reflections appear only where the curvature of the glass causes us to see it at a sharp enough angle for the Fresnel function to begin affecting the opacity. Anywhere the viewing angle is close to the normal of the mesh, the glass remains clear. Figure 10: Materials graph Car windshields typically use an athermic glass, which has slightly more reflectance than plain glass. The following image illustrates how the reflectivity of the athermic material changes over different wavelengths of incoming light: Figure 11: Material graph for the reflective Material To simulate this physical property, and make your reflections fit your scene more accurately, you can adjust the values of the Exponent and BaseReflectFraction inputs that you pass to the Fresnel node (called EXP and Intensity respectively in the Material shown above). This gives you control over the strength of the reflections and how they fade over the curvature of the glass. Figure 12: Effect of passing different input values to the Fresnel node Material 2: Tint The goal of this Material is to handle only the light that passes through the glass. We want this layer of the windshield to ignore reflections completely, but to color light that passes through the glass according to the tint of the windshield. To model this in Unreal Engine, we need another translucent Material. When you select your Material’s output node in the Material Editor, set the following values in the Details panel: Set the Blend Mode to Translucent. Set the Lighting Mode to Surface TransparencyVolume. This time, disable Screen Space Reflections. For this Material, we want to avoid all specular and reflective contributions. A simple way to set up the graph for this Material is to use a constant Opacity setting. Make the Base Color the color of the glass. Always use a Specular input of 0.0. This allows light to pass evenly through the glass. Use a Roughness input of 1.0. Use the Opacity channel to control how dark the glass is — that is, how much of the interior of the vehicle you can see from the outside. You can vary this value freely to make the tint effect as strong as you need it to be. Figure 13: Details panel in the Material editor for the tint Material Figure 14: Material graph for the tint Material A slightly more sophisticated setup is to vary the opacity of the glass based on the viewing angle of the camera, as we did in the reflective Material above. In the reflective Material, increasing opacity adds to the strength of the reflections. However, in the tint Material, increasing the opacity simulates the greater absorption of light as it passes through the glass at a sharper angle. The effect is that as your viewing angle increases, less light comes through the glass, and the objects on the other side become harder to see. Figure 15: Material graph for the tint Material, with optional absorption setup You can control the strength of the effect by raising or lowering the value of the absorption parameter shown above. However, this effect works best when you keep it very subtle. If you choose to use absorption, we recommend keeping the value below 0.1. Mesh and Material Assignments Now that you have your Static Mesh Actors and your two Materials ready, you need to assign the correct Materials to the correct Actors: Mesh 1, the exterior reflective layer: Assign the Reflective Material. Mesh 2, the outer tint layer: Assign the Tint Material. Mesh 3, the inner tint layer: Assign the Tint Material. Mesh 4: the interior reflective layer: Assign the Reflective Material. Sorting Translucency The final step in using this technique is to set up the translucency sort priority for the four Static Mesh Actors. When Unreal Engine needs to render multiple translucent objects that overlap in the camera view, it has to draw the objects in back before the objects in front. To figure out the drawing order, it compares the distance from the camera to the origin point of each object’s bounding box. Although this works most of the time, this strategy is not perfect; it can occasionally result in the rear object being drawn in front. To avoid that possibility, we can give the Engine a hint by setting the Translucency Sort Priority option for each of the four Static Mesh Actors in the Level. To find this option, select the Static Mesh Actor for each part of the windshield in either the Viewport or the World Outliner, scroll down in the Details panel to the Rendering section, and expand the advanced properties. Set the Actors to use the following values: Mesh 1: 1 Mesh 2: 0 Mesh 3: 0 Mesh 4: 1 With these settings, the Engine always chooses to render the inner layers of the windshield behind their corresponding outer layers. This retains the correct order for windshield rendering even if the camera flies into or out of the car. Conclusion With four Static Mesh Actors and two Materials set up as described above, you can achieve high-quality, realistic, and performant glass for any automotive rendering project in Unreal. Learn more about Unreal Engine at https://unrealengine.com. [Wayback machine archive]
  5. A global update for the "Character Interaction" package has been released. For more information click here. https://www.unrealengine.com/marketplace/character-interaction
  6. Hello again everyone, we are delighted to announce that our latest fictitious LMP1 (VSC Prototype) car body content addition is nearing completion, stay tuned for updates! Virtual SlotCars is currently on Steam Early Access, click here for more information! " A Le Mans Prototype (LMP) is the type of sports prototype race car used in the 24 Hours of Le Mans, FIA World Endurance Championship, WeatherTech SportsCar Championship, European Le Mans Series and Asian Le Mans Series. Le Mans Prototypes were created by the Automobile Club de l'Ouest (ACO)." All the best, VSC team :)
  7. Zayfod

    VSC Prototype body concept

    Hello again everyone, we are delighted to announce that our latest fictitious LMP1 (VSC Prototype) car body content addition is nearing completion, stay tuned for updates! Virtual SlotCars is currently on Steam Early Access, click here for more information! " A Le Mans Prototype (LMP) is the type of sports prototype race car used in the 24 Hours of Le Mans, FIA World Endurance Championship, WeatherTech SportsCar Championship, European Le Mans Series and Asian Le Mans Series. Le Mans Prototypes were created by the Automobile Club de l'Ouest (ACO)." All the best, VSC team :)
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