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How is Google increasing their database size on a per second basis?

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#1 Shashwat Rohilla   Members   

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Posted 26 July 2011 - 05:07 AM

How is Google increasing their database size on a per second basis?On the login page of gmail, the size written there keeps on increasing per second.
While adding machines, I think their must be a number of problems.
Please tell me how they are doing this.
How is their architecture so robust?



#2 rip-off   Moderators   

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Posted 26 July 2011 - 05:30 AM

How is Google increasing their database size on a per second basis?

Why do you think they are adding to it on a per-second basis? That incrementing figure needs to represent only the lower bound of "average amount added per second" over some period of time.

Please tell me how they are doing this.
How is their architecture so robust?

Have you tried... Googling for it?

#3 Hodgman   Moderators   

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Posted 26 July 2011 - 05:57 AM

How is Google increasing their database size on a per second basis?

It's not a real-time counter.....


Let's say they plug in one extra 1TB hard drive per day. Each day has 86400 seconds. Each TB has 1,099,511,627,776 bytes.
By dividing these, you get the equivalent figure of ~12MB per second.

So if I plug a 1TB hard-drive into my PC, i can say that today's average increase in space was 12MB/s... even though for 86399 of those seconds the growth was 0B/s, and for 1 of those seconds, the growth was 1TB/s.

#4 Álvaro   Members   

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Posted 26 July 2011 - 09:39 AM

There are many examples of quick-changing counters that are fed data much slower and are basically just telling you the approximate values and their rate of change. This page is full of them.




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