Jump to content

View more

Image of the Day

Boxes as reward for our ranking mode. ヾ(☆▽☆)
#indiedev #gamedev #gameart #screenshotsaturday https://t.co/ALF1InmM7K
IOTD | Top Screenshots

The latest, straight to your Inbox.

Subscribe to GameDev.net Direct to receive the latest updates and exclusive content.


Sign up now

Mathematics for 3D programming - Exercises

4: Adsense

Old topic!

Guest, the last post of this topic is over 60 days old and at this point you may not reply in this topic. If you wish to continue this conversation start a new topic.


  • You cannot reply to this topic
4 replies to this topic

#1 Getov   Members   

498
Like
0Likes
Like

Posted 22 January 2014 - 04:03 AM

Hello,

 

I am looking for book or other kind of source, that has exercises related to 3D programming math - linear algebra, transformations, rotations, vector operations, coordinate systems, distance between planes, projections ... etc.

 

I just want to sharpen my skills and find out where my weak points are, because reading only theory without practicing it is not really useful.



#2 Lactose   GDNet+   

10833
Like
4Likes
Like

Posted 22 January 2014 - 04:33 AM

Some of these topics are covered on Khan Academy, where there's both video lectures and online exercises.

https://www.khanacademy.org/

 

Khan Academy is free.


Hello to all my stalkers.

#3 Getov   Members   

498
Like
0Likes
Like

Posted 22 January 2014 - 04:47 AM

I've started watching the linear algebra videos some time ago and they are really nice. But it seems short on exercises (or not deep enough)



#4 apatriarca   Members   

2354
Like
2Likes
Like

Posted 22 January 2014 - 05:01 AM

Making a simple 3D game/tech demo or a ray tracer or .. is IMHO probably one of the best way to exercise those math skills.



#5 pyrotekgames   Members   

1077
Like
0Likes
Like

Posted 23 January 2014 - 02:22 PM

What you need to do is find a book on Mathematics in 3D graphics/3D games. Most of these books have example projects, exercises, etc. and depending on your taste in authors, you choose the one that teaches you the best. I myself learned a lot of this through trial and error; I'll read a little theory, then get to pen/paper/computer and play around with it.

 

And now that I remember this, I'll bring it up: I also looked into the book "3D Math Primer" by Fletcher Dunn and Ian Parberry when I was first learning the math.






Old topic!

Guest, the last post of this topic is over 60 days old and at this point you may not reply in this topic. If you wish to continue this conversation start a new topic.