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Can someone recommend a good "Mid Range" hardware?

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#1 gearifysoftware   Members   

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Posted 06 March 2017 - 10:26 AM

So I am at the point where I am optimizing and profiling my game and trying to decide what my minimum requirements should be. I am using OpenGL 4.2.

I want my game to be accessible to the casual gamer, or someone that does not have a souped up, or bleeding edge machine - especially since my engine is not using bleeding edge rendering techniques (it looks more like an Xbox 360 game). I have modest polygon counts and not huge numbers of models.

At the same time, I don't want to optimize for a dinosaur machine. 

Ideally I think I would at least like my game to run at 1080p @ 30hz. I expect I'll be ready to release around a year from now (its not a huge project).

I get that a lot of this is dependent on the details of the game, and some of those details are yet to be pinned down since the game is still in development, but I am thinking that 2010 era, non-gaming laptops are just setting the bar a little too low at this point.

At the moment I am eyeing some gaming desktops on Amazon around the $400 range. A couple years old.

Suggestions and advice are appreciated. Note I am looking for both a desktop tower and a gpu recommendations (complete packages are nice too).

Thanks! 


Edited by gearifysoftware, 06 March 2017 - 12:36 PM.


#2 d0nuts   Members   

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Posted 06 March 2017 - 10:33 PM

I think the stats on http://store.steampowered.com/hwsurvey/ should help get you started on what the average person has.



#3 Anthony Serrano   Members   

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Posted 07 March 2017 - 01:00 AM

For what it's worth, basically any current "mid-range" GPU should have no trouble running a 360-esque game at 1080p 60 fps - even my 5-year-old mid-range GPU (a Radeon 7850) can do that.

 

After all, the previous-gen consoles are over a decade old at this point, and they weren't cutting-edge even when they came out.



#4 TedEH   Members   

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Posted 07 March 2017 - 09:29 AM

IMO a good target might be the integrated Intel 4000 or whatever it is that you end up with when you don't bother with a video card.  Lots of non-enthusiasts, non-gamers, and people who don't know any better are likely to be using this, so that could be a big part of your target audience.  I don't know that they support OpenGL 4 though.  If you're able to back down your OpenGL version to 3-point-something you'll get a lot of support for "casual" hardware back.  I've been intentionally working with OpenGL 3.3 to give me the oldest version of OpenGL that still has the features I want.


Edited by TedEH, 07 March 2017 - 09:29 AM.


#5 Promit   Senior Moderators   

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Posted 07 March 2017 - 11:07 AM

For what it's worth, basically any current "mid-range" GPU should have no trouble running a 360-esque game at 1080p 60 fps - even my 5-year-old mid-range GPU (a Radeon 7850) can do that.
 
After all, the previous-gen consoles are over a decade old at this point, and they weren't cutting-edge even when they came out.

Hypothetically, sure. But all of us who work in limited budgets and environments don't have super tightly optimized graphics code and it's easy to screw these things up.
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#6 Orangeatang   Members   

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Posted 07 March 2017 - 11:36 AM

Logical Increments is a pretty good hardware guide.