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#Actualmaunovaha

Posted 17 February 2014 - 08:11 AM

I sense the uncomfortable vibe this topic brings to some, and I have recently ran into this little video:

 

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NpC1GbPw-fk

Charlie Crane: Game server development in node.js -- JSConf EU 2013

 

These good Chinese fellows are pretty much tackling this topic, in a serious scale. Open source, too. Great stuff. Video has some interesting statistics towards the end. I don't know any details, personally. Their code seems clean.

 

Well, that's nice.. watched the video and looked up their source.. seems really massive (lots of code comments in Chinese) tongue.png .. too bad that their example demo seems to run at bad server or with even worse bandwidth? downloading simple .js files takes likes 15 sec and executing game never get past 98%.

 

However, I would really like to hear why you describe that vibe to be uncomfortable ? smile.png

 

 

Super-dyanamic langauges like JavaScript (or PHP, or Python) can be highly productive while developing, but end up costing not only a bit of performance (a LOT for PHP, a little for JavaScript) but also in maintainability.
Check out this link, about how a single missing "var" statement ruined the launch of a product: http://blog.safeshepherd.com/23/how-one-missing-var-ruined-our-launch/
Sadly, all too common in JavaScript projects (although using jshint helps to some extent: http://jshint.com/ )

 

Yes, I think the problems of that is somewhat tackled down with automatic jshint (on save) including for example. JsFormat/EditorConfig etc. plugins for sublime, this all requires ofc. that you set those up and full team who is developing is committed to do so. Because jshint actions can be made run on save you really can't push code without var etc. to repository. I really like jshint, just set rules to your js once and start coding. (ok, if you are dumb you can ignore the warnings in console and just go with it).


#3maunovaha

Posted 17 February 2014 - 06:18 AM

I sense the uncomfortable vibe this topic brings to some, and I have recently ran into this little video:

 

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NpC1GbPw-fk

Charlie Crane: Game server development in node.js -- JSConf EU 2013

 

These good Chinese fellows are pretty much tackling this topic, in a serious scale. Open source, too. Great stuff. Video has some interesting statistics towards the end. I don't know any details, personally. Their code seems clean.

 

Well, that's nice.. watched the video and looked up their source.. seems really massive (lots of code comments in Chinese) tongue.png .. too bad that their example demo seems to run at bad server or with even worse bandwidth? downloading simple .js files takes likes 15 sec and executing game never get past 98%.

 

However, I would really like to hear why you describe that vibe to be uncomfortable ? :) 

 

 

Super-dyanamic langauges like JavaScript (or PHP, or Python) can be highly productive while developing, but end up costing not only a bit of performance (a LOT for PHP, a little for JavaScript) but also in maintainability.
Check out this link, about how a single missing "var" statement ruined the launch of a product: http://blog.safeshepherd.com/23/how-one-missing-var-ruined-our-launch/
Sadly, all too common in JavaScript projects (although using jshint helps to some extent: http://jshint.com/ )

 

Yes, I think the problems of that is somewhat tackled down with automatic jshint (on save) including for example. jsformat etc. plugins for sublime, this all requires ofc. that you set those up and full team who is developing is committed to do so. Because jshint actions can be made run on save you really can't push code without var etc. to repository. I really like jshint, just set rules to your js once and start coding. (ok, if you are dumb you can ignore the warnings in console and just go with it).


#2maunovaha

Posted 17 February 2014 - 06:16 AM

I sense the uncomfortable vibe this topic brings to some, and I have recently ran into this little video:

 

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NpC1GbPw-fk

Charlie Crane: Game server development in node.js -- JSConf EU 2013

 

These good Chinese fellows are pretty much tackling this topic, in a serious scale. Open source, too. Great stuff. Video has some interesting statistics towards the end. I don't know any details, personally. Their code seems clean.

 

Well, that's nice.. watched the video and looked up their source.. seems really massive (lots of code comments in Chinese) tongue.png .. too bad that their example demo seems to run at bad server or with even worse bandwidth? downloading simple .js files takes likes 15 sec and executing game never get past 98%.

 

 

Super-dyanamic langauges like JavaScript (or PHP, or Python) can be highly productive while developing, but end up costing not only a bit of performance (a LOT for PHP, a little for JavaScript) but also in maintainability.
Check out this link, about how a single missing "var" statement ruined the launch of a product: http://blog.safeshepherd.com/23/how-one-missing-var-ruined-our-launch/
Sadly, all too common in JavaScript projects (although using jshint helps to some extent: http://jshint.com/ )

 

Yes, I think the problems of that is somewhat tackled down with automatic jshint (on save) including for example. jsformat etc. plugins for sublime, this all requires ofc. that you set those up and full team who is developing is committed to do so. Because jshint actions can be made run on save you really can't push code without var etc. to repository. I really like jshint, just set rules to your js once and start coding. (ok, if you are dumb you can ignore the warnings in console and just go with it).


#1maunovaha

Posted 17 February 2014 - 06:14 AM

I sense the uncomfortable vibe this topic brings to some, and I have recently ran into this little video:

 

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NpC1GbPw-fk

Charlie Crane: Game server development in node.js -- JSConf EU 2013

 

These good Chinese fellows are pretty much tackling this topic, in a serious scale. Open source, too. Great stuff. Video has some interesting statistics towards the end. I don't know any details, personally. Their code seems clean.

 

Well, that's nice.. watched the video and looked up their source.. seems really massive (lots of code comments in Chinese) :P .. too bad that their example demo seems to run at bad server or with even worse bandwidth? downloading simple .js files takes likes 15 sec and executing game never get past 98%.

 

 

Super-dyanamic langauges like JavaScript (or PHP, or Python) can be highly productive while developing, but end up costing not only a bit of performance (a LOT for PHP, a little for JavaScript) but also in maintainability.
Check out this link, about how a single missing "var" statement ruined the launch of a product: http://blog.safeshepherd.com/23/how-one-missing-var-ruined-our-launch/
Sadly, all too common in JavaScript projects (although using jshint helps to some extent: http://jshint.com/ )

 

Yes, I think the problems of that is somewhat tackled down with automatic jshint (on save) including for example. jsformat etc. plugins for sublime, this all requires ofc. that you set those up and full team who is developing is committed to do so. Because jshint actions can be made run on save you really can't push code without var etc. to repository. I really like jshint, just set rules to your js once and start coding.


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