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I would like to make some money from Game Development


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#1 eugie17   Members   -  Reputation: 100

Posted 20 October 2011 - 03:10 PM

Hi, I work at a game dev. company that creates simple 2d games using .Net and DirectX, I would like to eventually invest in starting my own business in game dev industry (i.e. create my own games) I think IOS and Android platforms are great target for fast profits, and I have read some IOS books and am learning about it. I would like to get your advice about this, what do you guys suggest?

and currently I don't have a graphics designer or game story writer I don't know if I should outsource that or what's best please share your opinion.

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#2 BeanDog   Members   -  Reputation: 1063

Posted 20 October 2011 - 03:47 PM

Be sure that your employment contract allows you to create games for profit outside of work. You might end up working until you finally miraculously get a hit, then get sued by your employer for your profits.

~BenDilts( void );

Lucidchart: Online Flow Chart Software; Lucidpress: Digital Publishing Software


#3 ApochPiQ   Moderators   -  Reputation: 16079

Posted 20 October 2011 - 04:08 PM

I think, like most fad-driven industries, trying to start a game development business as a financial investment is a phenomenally poor idea.

If you want to make money there are far better investments out there.

If you want to run a business there are far less risky options.

If you want to make games, then the other two things should be more like obstacles and annoyances, not goals. Then you hire someone to take care of those aspects, and focus on making games.

#4 eugie17   Members   -  Reputation: 100

Posted 20 October 2011 - 04:33 PM

Be sure that your employment contract allows you to create games for profit outside of work. You might end up working until you finally miraculously get a hit, then get sued by your employer for your profits.


I am not competing with them, and their games are totally different than what I am planning on creating, I am sure it's not an issue

#5 colinhect   Members   -  Reputation: 193

Posted 20 October 2011 - 04:42 PM

I think, like most fad-driven industries, trying to start a game development business as a financial investment is a phenomenally poor idea.

If you want to make money there are far better investments out there.

If you want to run a business there are far less risky options.

If you want to make games, then the other two things should be more like obstacles and annoyances, not goals. Then you hire someone to take care of those aspects, and focus on making games.


While I agree with this there is still the possibility that your goal is to start a business that makes games. If this is the case then the risk is not a problem yet the business is still part of the goal.

#6 eugie17   Members   -  Reputation: 100

Posted 20 October 2011 - 04:46 PM

I think, like most fad-driven industries, trying to start a game development business as a financial investment is a phenomenally poor idea.

If you want to make money there are far better investments out there.

If you want to run a business there are far less risky options.

If you want to make games, then the other two things should be more like obstacles and annoyances, not goals. Then you hire someone to take care of those aspects, and focus on making games.


So you don't think that creating games for iphon/android is the best way to make money?, I know there are other ways to make money but I am trying to go with something I have experience in

#7 DarklyDreaming   Members   -  Reputation: 363

Posted 20 October 2011 - 06:13 PM

What Apoch is getting at is you either get into the game biz to make games first and everything else second, or you choose to go business first and everything else second - in which case, the game biz isn't among the prime candidates for making money.

@OP: Of course making games for smart phones isn't the best way to make money - how could it be? The financial returns are usually poor, if existent, and the market is driven by flukes and a rapidly changing demographic; knowing what will sell one month will not help you the next. That's not a terribly great way to build your business. Of course, as in anything, there are ways to guide your way in these sorts of things but nothing will help you to make completely accurate predictions all the time so it's a virtual certainty that sooner or later you will lose money on one or more of your games.

In fact, I'd wager a fair amount that your first half-dozen titles will barely break even or be financed at a loss. So, the primary reason for doing it shouldn't be because it's financially sound - it isn't.
"I will personally burn everything I've made to the fucking ground if I think I can catch them in the flames."
~ Gabe

"I don't mean to rush you but you are keeping two civilizations waiting!"
~ Cavil, BSG.
"If it's really important to you that other people follow your True Brace Style, it just indicates you're inexperienced. Go find something productive to do."
~ Bregma

"Well, you're not alone.

There's a club for people like that. It's called Everybody and we meet at the bar."

~ Antheus


#8 ApochPiQ   Moderators   -  Reputation: 16079

Posted 20 October 2011 - 06:16 PM

By the time you accumulate the capital, staff, legal status, and other prerequisites of running a game-production business, the mobile games bubble is likely to have shifted to some other market. You're talking about starting a many-year venture around a fad which is, due to the rapidly-changing nature of technology, probably going to be superseded by some other major fad in the space of a few years. Certainly the monetization of mobile games is currently so fluid and ill-defined that you would need a superb business plan to attract decent investment and employees; nobody will gamble on a business plan that amounts to "make game, get money."

If you have a more solid proposal, cool; I don't mean to imply that you're just shopping for a get-rich-quick scheme here, although to be frank it does kind of sound that way. But all we can go on is what you've posted, and from what you've said, it doesn't sound like you're sitting on a brilliant marketing strategy for capitalizing on the soon-to-be dwindling mobile space.

Keep in mind that 2 years ago, web games were the rage. If you weren't writing web games, especially for Facebook, you just didn't get it. And now people are fleeing the burning ship of web games by the thousands, largely moving on to mobile.


Anything you want to do as a money-making venture needs to be resilient in the face of this kind of dynamic climate. There are two basic ways to get rich in a rapidly-moving industry: play ultra-short term, or play ultra-long term.

The latter is more obvious: you design a plan that will continue to make you profitable for many years, despite the shifts in the market. Then instead of hoping for a mid-term lucky strike, you sit it out and recoup your investment in, say, ten years.

The former is much more difficult and non-obvious: you start with a massive amount of money, build a team extremely quickly (think weeks), produce a couple of hits, and then withdraw and start your next business in some other space. By the time you realize that there's a profitable fad-based market around, it's almost too late; unless you are already a very good entrepreneur, you won't be able to get in on the fad in time. It'll dissolve out from under you and you'll be yet another dot-com bubble-bust statistic. The people who do get rich off of fads are the ones who see the trend coming before anyone else, and are usually the first 25% or so of people to try and capitalize on the market. The next 25% will probably do OK, the stellar examples of the next 25% will be alright, and everyone else will fail.


If you want to run a games business, great; just don't expect to succeed with a fast-money scheme unless you're already extremely good with businesses. (If you're here soliciting advice, you're almost certainly not enough of an established entrepreneur to pull this off.) Either go long-term or find some other way to generate your income.

#9 way2lazy2care   Members   -  Reputation: 782

Posted 20 October 2011 - 06:18 PM


Be sure that your employment contract allows you to create games for profit outside of work. You might end up working until you finally miraculously get a hit, then get sued by your employer for your profits.


I am not competing with them, and their games are totally different than what I am planning on creating, I am sure it's not an issue


Just because you aren't directly competing with them I would double check your contract and maybe ask a lawyer. While it might not be a directly competing product they may still own any IPs you work on (especially if you work on even a splinter of it at your workplace/during work hours) or they may be indirectly competing with you, which might still qualify.

#10 eugie17   Members   -  Reputation: 100

Posted 20 October 2011 - 06:52 PM

Thank you guys, am not that good in business, but I am willing to learn what works best, and I will make more research maybe consider other types of projects.

#11 mdwh   Members   -  Reputation: 893

Posted 21 October 2011 - 06:57 AM

Don't limit yourself to just those two mobile platforms - there's a wealth of other platforms with large userbase, and less of a bandwagon of developers in competition (Nokia, etc).

I would also agree with ApochPiQ - don't think you can make millions, because of a few success stories you read :) And any "gold rush" period when you could make loads of money from something trivial has surely long gone, especially for those two platforms. You could still make money perhaps, but that goes for any platform.

Also check out the (sadly now locked) post about earning $12,000 a year in game development, to put things into perspective. Is this just for extra pocket money on the side, or do you believe you can set up a business to do better than what you currently earn in game development?
http://erebusrpg.sourceforge.net/ - Erebus, Open Source RPG for Windows/Linux/Android
http://homepage.ntlworld.com/mark.harman/conquests.html - Conquests, Open Source Civ-like Game for Windows/Linux

#12 eugie17   Members   -  Reputation: 100

Posted 21 October 2011 - 09:39 AM

Don't limit yourself to just those two mobile platforms - there's a wealth of other platforms with large userbase, and less of a bandwagon of developers in competition (Nokia, etc).

I would also agree with ApochPiQ - don't think you can make millions, because of a few success stories you read :) And any "gold rush" period when you could make loads of money from something trivial has surely long gone, especially for those two platforms. You could still make money perhaps, but that goes for any platform.

Also check out the (sadly now locked) post about earning $12,000 a year in game development, to put things into perspective. Is this just for extra pocket money on the side, or do you believe you can set up a business to do better than what you currently earn in game development?


I am a programmer, about 4 years ago I was introduced to internet marketing and I liked it, invested some time and effort in it and the ROI was great for 3 years, but as the other members mentioned it's a rapidly changing environment and things don't last forever, and now I am trying to create something and sell it, something small, I am not talking about a project that will take me years!, I would like to start small and grow. currently I have a day job, but I am not a "day job" guy at all, I like to be my own boss eventually.




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