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the games with the most influence on your life


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#21 AFS   Members   -  Reputation: 922

Posted 16 September 2013 - 07:21 AM

Civilization IV.

 

I have a love/hate relantionship with that game; I love its replay value, strong learning curve, great difficulty and complexity, but I hate the AI, the odds-based combat and the realization that you spend a significant amount of time just waiting between turns or fighting against the interface.

 

So, that said, it's not one of my favorite games, but it's definitely the one that had the most impact in my life: thanks to it I learned to be much more analytical and organized, and that improved my gameplay a lot in games in general. Now I think before I act instead of just doing something, and I try to be efficient.

 

It goes both ways, though; now I can't get into games with simplistic gameplay because there's not much to analyze, and I can't enjoy games if I'm not efficient; I always get pissed when I lose a soldier in the X-Com remake because I always try to archieve the "perfect run". But oh well, I prefer it that way.

 

*Maybe* the game also helped me to be more organized in real life, but I think that's stretching it.


Edited by AFS, 16 September 2013 - 07:22 AM.


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#22 fir   Members   -  Reputation: -460

Posted 16 September 2013 - 09:33 AM

Civilization IV.

 

I have a love/hate relantionship with that game; I love its replay value, strong learning curve, great difficulty and complexity, but I hate the AI, the odds-based combat and the realization that you spend a significant amount of time just waiting between turns or fighting against the interface.

 

So, that said, it's not one of my favorite games, but it's definitely the one that had the most impact in my life: thanks to it I learned to be much more analytical and organized, and that improved my gameplay a lot in games in general. Now I think before I act instead of just doing something, and I try to be efficient.

 

It goes both ways, though; now I can't get into games with simplistic gameplay because there's not much to analyze, and I can't enjoy games if I'm not efficient; I always get pissed when I lose a soldier in the X-Com remake because I always try to archieve the "perfect run". But oh well, I prefer it that way.

 

*Maybe* the game also helped me to be more organized in real life, but I think that's stretching it.

 

You would have a good talk with my friend Pete (fine fellow) he said to me that he is one of the best players in civ in my country and indeed he is for sure very god civ player - he could probably speaking about civilisiation for months I know he played civ4 a lot too, back in the times I remember he showed me its savegames in civ1 on amiga it was all dark from railways and the score plot was going through the top dege of the screen and go from bottom edge up - few times : O

I was always losing when playing with him and I do not like games when you must accumulate values in time it got me angry very much those days (but damn that were good times)



#23 farmdve   Members   -  Reputation: 194

Posted 17 September 2013 - 01:23 AM

That's probably Crysis 2 and Crysis 3, I was seeing hexagons everywhere afterwards. 



#24 FGFS   Members   -  Reputation: 202

Posted 18 September 2013 - 11:04 PM

Flightsimulator from 98 onwards, Doom 3 on Linux was huge fun and I still play Doom3BFG, Tomb Raider and FSX.



#25 mike656   Members   -  Reputation: 152

Posted 18 September 2013 - 11:32 PM

Civilization IV.

 

I have a love/hate relantionship with that game; I love its replay value, strong learning curve, great difficulty and complexity, but I hate the AI, the odds-based combat and the realization that you spend a significant amount of time just waiting between turns or fighting against the interface.

 

So, that said, it's not one of my favorite games, but it's definitely the one that had the most impact in my life: thanks to it I learned to be much more analytical and organized, and that improved my gameplay a lot in games in general. Now I think before I act instead of just doing something, and I try to be efficient.

 

It goes both ways, though; now I can't get into games with simplistic gameplay because there's not much to analyze, and I can't enjoy games if I'm not efficient; I always get pissed when I lose a soldier in the X-Com remake because I always try to archieve the "perfect run". But oh well, I prefer it that way.

 

*Maybe* the game also helped me to be more organized in real life, but I think that's stretching it.

 

Yeah, I've always been a fan of CIV but indeed it has been a love/hate relationship with me too. I'm right there with you, and I've been playing it for a long time now.



#26 Icebone1000   Members   -  Reputation: 1187

Posted 19 September 2013 - 05:07 PM

Rock n` Roll Racing (fun and style),

The Lost Vikings 2 (gameplay),

Fallout 1 (style, atmosphere and history),

Soul Reaver 1 (atmosphere, history and gameplay...and ozar midrashim),

GTA 3 (freedom and fun),

Super Metroid (style and gameplay),

Super Bomberman 4 (fun and gameplay),

AvsP 2 (atmosphere, gameplay),

Super Mario World (gameplay and fun),

Legend of Mana (art and style).



#27 L. Spiro   Crossbones+   -  Reputation: 15474

Posted 19 September 2013 - 07:23 PM

As a child, I gained a very deep sense about what makes games terrible via Atari 2600’s E.T. the Extra-Terrestrial.  The seeds of understanding a player’s frustration at not knowing what to do and trying to do it with awful controls were planted.  Many games would later be examples of both good and bad gameplay, but being so young and the sheer level of bad it had reached made this one of the lessons learned with greatest impact.

 

Super Mario World was the first game I owned for myself, and it was the first to get me thinking about technical details behind how the computer works.  It got me asking the important questions: “How does it know to jump when I hit the button?  How does it know I hit a block or fell into lava?”.  I was 8.

 

Mario Paint would likely end up being the single most influential.  When I was 10, it allowed me to get into the R&D side of game development that would later be my career.

I wanted to animate sprites growing, shrinking, and rotating, but without built-in tools you had to do it manually.

I wasn’t content with the imperfections in the manual way so I designed a visual mathematical way to do it.

Let’s say I wanted to shrink a sprite by 2 pixels, one on each side.  I took the line tool and draw a line above the sprite with exactly the same width, but 2 pixels raised from end-to-end.  The two pixels where it changed heights were the columns I would eliminate from the sprite via copying and pasting one pixel over.  Repeat for vertical reduction.

I was able to scale sprites up and down in such a way they looked as if they were running on the FX chip.  I eventually invented a similar technique for rotations.

 

It let me, at an early age, explore my ideas for “algorithms” and to see my results come to life, making it easily the most overall influential.

 

 

 

 

And yet somehow I still didn’t know I was going to be a game programmer or even be in the industry at all.

I was already brainwashed by family, teachers, and classmates, who all insisted I would be able to land a top job as an artist at Disney.  I would still need some more influence.

 

The Legend of Zelda: A Link to the PastChrono Trigger and Final Fantasy VII would be the main pushes in that direction (though not all at once of course, as Final Fantasy VII would contribute, but not until later), but initially making me think about being a designer, not a programmer.  They showed me games were more than just technology to be figured out, but that they could fully engulf a player into a new world when done correctly.

I started designing my own board games with strategy elements from The Legend of Zelda: A Link to the Past mixed with story elements from the others.

 

I could do the art and design, but if I wanted to actually get something made, I would have to be able to do the programming and music too.

 

At the age of late 13/early 14 I started learning programming with TI-BASIC on a TI-81 calculator, and I concurrently began learning piano on my own.

 

Finally, with Starsiege: Tribes’ script language, I was ready to go full-blast with programming.  I already had a few years’ worth of C++ experience by then and now I had an easy way to get real 3D results into a game that others could play.

I finally learned that I like programming even more than design, and as I kept making mods for the game as well as my own side projects such as Something Something VII Online, it slowly became clear what I was meant to do.

 

And that is how I became an actor on Japanese TV and movies.

 

 

The End,

L. Spiro

 

 

 

As a side note, GoldenEye 007 and Perfect Dark were also both huge influences.  After I learned more about game development I had a better understanding, and the way they put team heads and personal touches into their games blew my mind, and I wanted to work specifically for Rareware growing up.

That ended as soon as they were bought by Microsoft.


Edited by L. Spiro, 20 September 2013 - 05:29 AM.

It is amazing how often people try to be unique, and yet they are always trying to make others be like them. - L. Spiro 2011
I spent most of my life learning the courage it takes to go out and get what I want. Now that I have it, I am not sure exactly what it is that I want. - L. Spiro 2013
I went to my local Subway once to find some guy yelling at the staff. When someone finally came to take my order and asked, “May I help you?”, I replied, “Yeah, I’ll have one asshole to go.”
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#28 Extremophile   Members   -  Reputation: 168

Posted 19 September 2013 - 09:14 PM

Considering my "gaming peak" was in the mid 90s :

 

My favorite game of all time is Chrono Trigger.

 

Very close are :

Zelda : A link to the past

Super Mario World

Final Fantasy VI(III US)

Seiken Densetsu 3

 

The last game that really impressed me is Bioshock Infinite.

 



#29 TheChubu   Crossbones+   -  Reputation: 5213

Posted 20 September 2013 - 01:54 AM

Even if I do played many older classics like Mario, Duck Hunt, Contra, Ninja Gaiden, Megaman, Mortal Kombat, etc. And many PS1 classics like Gran Turismo, Resident Evil, Metal Gear Solid, Twisted Metal, Megaman X5, etc, (and many many more for GBA, SNES, and don't even start counting when I got my own PC to play with) my interest in computers began when I was 15 or 16 years old.

 

(holy hell I never thought before how many different games for different platforms I actually played!)

 

So I'd say that my actual tendency in "games I would like to make" was ignited by The Elder Scrolls 4 Oblivion. I was mildly interested in RPGs before but once I saw that RPG != dice roll/isometric view/party/point and click, I fell for that kind of game. I've been a big fan of whatever Bethesda does since then, even if I can say 800 things that went wrong on each of their games, I still like them a lot simply because those are the kind of games I'd like to make.

 

Btw OP, Gothic 3 was the buggiest thing I ever touched, but it has a very nice charm to it.


"I AM ZE EMPRAH OPENGL 3.3 THE CORE, I DEMAND FROM THEE ZE SHADERZ AND MATRIXEZ"

 

My journals: dustArtemis ECS framework and Making a Terrain Generator


#30 telso2   Members   -  Reputation: 102

Posted 27 September 2013 - 04:44 AM

Ocarina of time for sure, sucked me into a different world when i was playing that game






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