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Italian girl wants to be a game designer


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#21 rAm_y_   Members   -  Reputation: 481

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Posted 14 August 2014 - 02:11 PM

As I said in my first post, certificate courses are late high school level, diploma courses are HNC(1 year) and HND(2 years) at college(not university). If you did an HNC that would allow you into 2nd year of an HND, if you did and HND that would allow you into either 2nd or 3rd year of a Bachelors degree, it just depends on course.

 

Degree courses are Bachelors degrees, either a 3 year ordinary Bachelors degree, or a 4-5 year Honors Bachelors  degree.

 

Master degrees are post graduate degrees, usually 1 year courses, they are either taught or research based, usually taught, it is also possible to combine a Bachelors degree and masters degree into one.

 

So it goes, certificate -> HNC -> HND -> Bachelors Degree -> Master degree.-> Phd -> DSc -> Guru -> Obi-Wan Kenobi.

 

Ok a Dsc(Doctor of Science) will not count for arts I was just joking about, I only ever met one lecturer at University that had a DSc, quite a top accolade.


Edited by rAm_y_, 14 August 2014 - 02:17 PM.


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#22 DeveloperXS   Members   -  Reputation: 111

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Posted 14 August 2014 - 02:55 PM


So it goes, certificate -> HNC -> HND -> Bachelors Degree -> Master degree.-> Phd -> DSc -> Guru -> Obi-Wan Kenobi.

 Ahahahah biggrin.png

 

Thank you all for the informations

smile.png

 

It's more complicated than I expected :/ 


Edited by DeveloperXS, 14 August 2014 - 03:19 PM.


#23 walsh06   Members   -  Reputation: 662

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Posted 14 August 2014 - 04:15 PM

I'm Irish, but not in the game making business. I'm not aware of any major game development studios in here, most software companies in general seem to use Ireland more as a convenient tax beachhead than a place to actually make things. There does seem to be a smattering of smaller studios.

 

That said, I am vaguely aware of several courses in game design that have sprung up in some of the third level institutes here - I know this because they sprung up after I entered college on a more general course! I can't personally vouch for/against them, but if you like living here for whatever reason, there certainly are options to study here. I don't know how highly such game specific courses are thought of (regardless of where you study), I'd definitely recommend researching that.

 

For reference, I believe that "standard" 4 year university degree here are typically FETAC level 8, so a level 6 would probably not be considered on par with this.

They dont make their own games but certainly without Demonware there is a certain FPS franchise that probably wouldnt be as succesful as it is. They are probably the largest company in the gaming industry in Ireland, that develop anyway. We have a number of support centres here.

 

In terms of the course, Im in UL doing the games development course there and its quite good. Certainly gives me a good grounding and the work experience program is very useful. Carlow has a good course too. Also Queens university belfast has some really good courses. I know this from meeting the guys at events like Games Fleadh. There are others too but those would be the ones Im most familiar with.



#24 rip-off   Moderators   -  Reputation: 8727

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Posted 14 August 2014 - 04:46 PM

Speaking of middleware, I've read that the Havok physics engine was originally Irish, though some light Googling indicates they have since been bought by Intel.



#25 Buster2000   Members   -  Reputation: 1775

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Posted 15 August 2014 - 01:52 AM


i have got 24 years old and I live in a Country where Game Dev is still something "mysterious"...

 

I'm from the UK and my first game programming job was in Italy.  Crotone to be exact.



#26 DeveloperXS   Members   -  Reputation: 111

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Posted 15 August 2014 - 03:41 AM


In terms of the course, Im in UL doing the games development course there and its quite good. Certainly gives me a good grounding and the work experience program is very useful. Carlow has a good course too. Also Queens university belfast has some really good courses. I know this from meeting the guys at events like Games Fleadh. There are others too but those would be the ones Im most familiar with.

 I'll keep in mind these universities, but i think that i'll opt for a course with less access requirements mellow.png

 

 

 


I'm from the UK and my first game programming job was in Italy.  Crotone to be exact.

Really? blink.png This surprised me biggrin.png


Edited by DeveloperXS, 15 August 2014 - 03:42 AM.


#27 DeveloperXS   Members   -  Reputation: 111

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Posted 17 August 2014 - 06:56 AM

Hi,

can i ask you what's the real difference between a Computer Games Art degree and a Computer Games Animation degree?

I found these courses at Teesside University 

http://www.tees.ac.uk/prospectus/ug/UG_course.cfm?courseid=11&fos=1&fossub=2#coursecontent

 

and

http://www.tees.ac.uk/prospectus/ug/UG_course.cfm?courseid=205&fos=1&fossub=2#coursecontent

 

I can't understand why Games art and Games animation are in two different courses..


Edited by DeveloperXS, 17 August 2014 - 07:24 AM.


#28 Tom Sloper   Moderators   -  Reputation: 10159

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Posted 17 August 2014 - 07:28 AM

Art is stationary. Animation moves. That's why the courses are different.
-- Tom Sloper
Sloperama Productions
Making games fun and getting them done.
www.sloperama.com

Please do not PM me. My email address is easy to find, but note that I do not give private advice.

#29 rip-off   Moderators   -  Reputation: 8727

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Posted 17 August 2014 - 07:35 AM

Looking at the details, they appear to share many common modules, so there are similarities. However, it is a question of emphasis. For example, a gameplay animator will focus on living, moving content that will be included in the final game, where as a concept artist will generally be involved in early stages with static images as the art style is being established. The bigger the studio, the more specialised you're likely to be, in a smaller studio there could be just a single "art" person that does all these things and more.

 

I'd recommend you watch Double Fine's documentaries about their various projects "Massive Chalice" (free on Youtube), "Broken Age" (available if you back the project) or "Amnesia Fortnight" (free on Youtube), these will give you some sense of the different disciplines and how involved they are at different stages of a project, as well as being entertaining to watch.






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