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#Actualfrob

Posted 29 May 2013 - 09:42 PM

Your road is unique to you.

Remember that you are not in a vacuum. When you start talking about a job at a game company you need to consider what is around you.

Are you competing against very few people or are you competing against many?

Around here there are six major universities and another five minor universities with 4+ year CS programs within a 60 minute commute, several of them highly ranked globally and offering specialties in game development or specialties in game-related topics like computer graphics. The biggest of them, the University of Utah, has ties all over the game industry and the graphics world. Around here if you want to compete you need the degree AND the portfolio.

Around here we have a huge pile of job applicants for each rare opening, many applicants with portfolios of polished hobby games in addition to a four year degree, or occasionally even a few with masters degrees in the topics we need. In these cases the people with the degree and portfolio make the short list, the people with the 2-year trade school or simple high school diploma never get called in.


This of course varies based on location. All you mentioned is somewhere in Australia; game studios in a city like Melbourne will have different applicants than a game studio in Darwin or northern Australia generally. (I don't think there are any up there...)

When the local studio needs to fill a job opening, can you guess the credentials of those who apply? What do you expect their stack of applicants looks like?

What are you doing to ensure your application is the best of the lot?

That is what matters in your personal story.

#2frob

Posted 29 May 2013 - 09:38 PM

Your road is unique to you.

Remember that you are not in a vacuum. When you start talking about a job at a game company you need to consider what is around you.

Are you competing against very few people or are you competing against many?

Around here there are six major universities with CS programs within a 60 minute commute, several of them highly ranked globally and offering specialties in game development or specialties in game-related topics like computer graphics. The biggest of them, the University of Utah, has ties all over the game industry and the graphics world. Around here if you want to compete you need the degree AND the portfolio.

Around here we have a huge pile of job applicants for each rare opening, many applicants with portfolios of polished hobby games in addition to a four year degree, or occasionally even a few with masters degrees in the topics we need. In these cases the people with the degree and portfolio make the short list, the people with the 2-year trade school or simple high school diploma never get called in.


This of course varies based on location. All you mentioned is somewhere in Australia; game studios in a city like Melbourne will have different applicants than a game studio in Darwin or northern Australia generally. (I don't think there are any up there...)

When the local studio needs to fill a job opening, can you guess the credentials of those who apply? What do you expect their stack of applicants looks like?

What are you doing to ensure your application is the best of the lot?

That is what matters in your personal story.

#1frob

Posted 29 May 2013 - 09:37 PM

Your road is unique to you.

Remember that you are not in a vacuum. When you start talking about a job at a game company you need to consider what is around you.

Are you competing against very few people or are you competing against many?

Around here there are six major universities with CS programs within a 60 minute commute, several of them highly ranked globally and offering specialties in game development or specialties in game-related topics like computer graphics. The biggest of them, the University of Utah, has ties all over the game industry and the graphics world. Around here if you want to compete you need the degree AND the portfolio.

Around here we have a huge pile of job applicants for each rare opening, many applicants with portfolios of polished hobby games in addition to a four year degree, or occasionally even a few with masters degrees in the topics we need. In these cases the people with the degree and portfolio make the short list, the people with the 2-year trade school or simple high school diploma never get called in.


This of course varies based on location. All you mentioned is somewhere in Australia; game studios in a city like Melbourne will have different applicants than a game studio in Darwin or northern Australia generally. (I don't think there are any up there...)

When the local studio needs to fill a job opening, can you guess what does their stack of applicants look like?

What are you doing to ensure your application is the best of the lot?

That is what matters in your personal story.

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