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    1. Past hour
    2. Rutin

      Texture tools

      Yea, I use such tools all the time. When I create procedural textures for ground it's great when using in 3D but for 2D I have to bridge the four sides and use healing brush for blending so it will look seamless when tiling. Looking forward to your next update.
    3. lawnjelly

      Texture tools

      Oh that's just colour manipulation, I haven't even got to the healing! It is awesome and should help with auto tiling the image, as well as blending different layers.
    4. Scouting Ninja

      Healing during travels in RPG?

      Darkest Dungeon solved the problem by having two types of health. Mental health and Physical health. It's a lot like you mentioned here. So maybe call it something more common like "morale" and see if you can expand on what games like Darkest Dungeon is doing. Lots of room for improvement on this system. Another way old games worked was with money. The traveler needed money to do things but could only obtain money from towns. A more strict wealth system with drains as the player explore, travel fees and the like, and the only means of money near inns and towns.
    5. Rutin

      Texture tools

      Nice healing brush!
    6. lawnjelly

      Texture tools

      After attempting to texture some models recently, using projection painting in 3d paint, the new healing brush is proving fantastic at healing up those edges between projections, but I must admit I get very frustrated trying to find suitable reference images. Part of the problem I have decided is that I'd often like to be able to have larger, more homogeneous areas of texture to clone from. Given that I have a reasonable healing implementation working, it struck me I should be able to have some algorithms for doing this little job for me, to provide better source material for painting. I thought about putting this ability directly into 3d paint, however, it seemed to make more sense to do a separate small utility app for this kind of thing, which might be useful to more people. So, eager to not make the major mistake I made with 3d paint, that of under-engineering the initial program, I decided to make a positive effort and spend a few days building a solid backbone to the texturing program, so it will be easy to maintain and add to in the future. Instead of making a photoshop like affair, this will be a very focused app, and at the moment I'm thinking in terms of a node based editor with some input textures, and methods, producing intermediate and final textures for export. I'm planning for you to be able to move the nodes in the UI, assign inputs and outputs and parameters. Although the UI is not yet operational, the framework is getting there and I've implemented a first test method. I decided one useful first pass before other methods would be to equalize the colours across an image. Here is an example I have run it on a skin photo, left is before, right is after. Bland and boring on the right, but that is what I am going for, it should be easier to clone etc. The way the method works is it first finds the average colour in the entire image, then gaussian blurs the image. For each pixel it then finds the difference between the blurred colour and the average colour, then adds this difference (with a multiplier) to the original pixel colour. This has the effect of reducing local colour contrast, or increasing colour contrast depending on the sign of the multiplier. Anyway, obviously loads more methods to come, maybe some using variations of the healing technique from Georgiev's paper. All colours are converts to floats, and can be converted to linear, and HSL or LAB colour spaces.
    7. You won't find better than Godot. It is only 50MB after extract, with almost the same power as Unity. You can use C# with Godot, but it's own language is like Python making it a hundred times easier. Small engine, massive power, easy to use scripting language that is still fast and Open Source; it is easy to see why this engine is growing in popularity. There litierly isn't anything better than Godot at that scale. I really recommend you try it again; maybe after a few python for beginner tutorials. The only thing easier than Godot that is still small and has some power is: http://www.stencyl.com/
    8. nsmadsen

      Copyright question

      Yeah, I saw that. Your post was edited - I'm assuming not by you. Have you changed your user credentials? I think your account may have been hacked. I fixed it back to what you had originally posted.
    9. jkuehlin

      Copyright question

      WTF??? Is this what everyone else is seeing or is my browser bugging out?
    10. I'm working on an ECS model for a C++ game I'm developing. I feel like I've gotten a good grasp on the ECS model, however, I'm struggling to determine how I should actually organize and store the components. This question has been raised by the dilemma of how I want my engine to iterate over my components and systems. Here are two routes I could see myself going: 1) Store all components within entities themselves. This model would involve me creating an object pool of an entity type. Each entity type would contain a specific set of components relevant to that entity (e.g. graphics component, physics component, health component, etc.) I would then register this object pool with the appropriate system (e.g. physics system) which would then iterate over the objects as necessary. Pros: My systems would only have to iterate over entities that are known to have relevant components. Since the entities contain the actual components, the act of initializing each entity is (subjectively) easier. Cons: I need to register multiple object pools with each system (e.g. projectiles and enemies both have health components, thus I would need to register each object pool to the health system). 2) Store all components of the same type in a container and then give my entities references to these components. I would then register a single component container with a system (e.g. give the physics component array to the physics system). The system would then only need to iterate over a single container instead of multiple containers. I'm envisioning that all components are held within their respective system (e.g. physics system contains an array of physics components). Each entity would then contain a reference (pointer or ID handle) to an individual component. My entities would then essentially become objects that just contain references to components, but not the actual components themselves. Pros: The entire concept or register object pools to each system becomes obsolete, and each system only has to iterate over a single container. Cons: The process of initializing an entity becomes (subjectively) difficult. For example, to create a projectile, I would need to request individual components from each system. It then becomes possible that during the creation of an entity, I'm able to obtain one component but obtain another. Thus the entity is only partially created. I would need to account for all of these fail cases. I'm curious what your thoughts are on either option?
    11. You only need 1 scene info at a time. Triangles are counted by scene. You can also load all scenes at the same time, to see all stats: Scene 1: +/-4 800 tris Scene 2: +/-1 700 k Drag both scenes in, now you see the Triangle count is wrong. This is because of extra camera. Delete camera to get right count. Scene 1 + Scene 2 -> +/- (4 800 + 1 700 k) = +/- 7 200 triangles. Extra triangles is from shadows. Note: Removing 100 - 1000 triangles doesn't matter. You need to remove at least 24 000 to get better performance. That is why Unity doesn't tell you about every triangle.
    12. There is a big difference between "knowing" a language in the sense of how to create basic data types, control structures, classes, memory management, ect... and knowing how to put the pieces together and actually create solutions for your problems. Also, how are you defining "learned"...? People can throw around years, and how much they know all day, but if you cannot produce anything it means nothing. If you're not able to utilize the tools given to you, then having those tools (languages) is pointless. The fact that you're unwilling to change from VC++ 6 to something more modern tells everyone that you're unwilling to do what is necessary to complete your objective: Making a Multiplayer FPS Game. Or is your objective to make a Multiplayer FPS Game using only DirectX 9 as some sort of challenge? I don't know... As @Gnollrunner stated prior, there are other options: Unreal Engine 4, and Unity. If you're not at a level in which you can read API documentation to help create an engine using DirectX, maybe you're heading off the correct path here. Engine programming from the ground up isn't the same as picking up something like Unity and making your game. What games have you made using the above languages and APIs you listed? I'm curious because doing such a project without any prior projects under your belt using that API really doesn't make sense, on-top of staying in the past. If you're just going to use the source code from Quake, why not just pick up Unreal Engine 4 then? Or maybe look into creating Mods for FPS games instead of engine programming. Either way, I wish you the best in finding whatever solution you're looking for to complete this project.
    13. Today
    14. Hello! I'm been working in game audio since 2005 providing music, sound design, VO and implementation. Take a look at my demo reel and let me know how I can help make your next game come to life with great audio! I'm eager to work with creative, interesting projects. Hit me up! nate (AT) madsenstudios (DOT) com
    15. I once asked this question because I wanted game making software similar to Unity with an easy scripting language but with a small file size. I like Unity but its installation size is around 1GB and it's cluttery and overcomplicated in its file and project management. Some people suggested Urho3d and coppercube. I like something like Blitz3d with its very simple scripting language but it's discontinued and lacks a world/level editor, and Godot engine has a neat editor but its scripting language is too difficult, requiring confusing multiple lines for a simple collision, and very bad documentation. So, are there any other neat editors with simple scripting language and good capabilities as Unity but with a small file size? Both well known and not so well known? and free? And with good documentation.
    16. Dramolion

      Healing during travels in RPG?

      Why is there a "cost" to healing ? is skilling towards having a lot of hitpoints so overpowered it needs a debuff ??
    17. Scouting Ninja

      Project Spark [Programmer, Designer, Artist]

      It would be a good idea, to describe some of the things the team has done. This will get you both attention for the game and should help gather members. People like to join projects that is advancing.
    18. Here's the thing..... Learning languages doesn't mean that much. I'm not saying anything about your abilities, I'm just pointing out that if you are having major problems getting stuff working, then perhaps there are some areas you need to improve upon. The primary thing you need as a programmer is knowledge of algorithms and data structures. THIS IS #1. I've learned many langues over the years and I've forgotten half of them. I'm sure I'll never program in IBM 370 assembly language again in my entire life. In any case beyond algorithms and data structures, there are debugging skills and in a broader sense that includes finding information on the internet on how to get your job done without running to forums and asking people to fix your problems constantly. Yes forums are useful for certain things. They are great for discussing ideas and getting feedback, and sometimes people can point you in the right direction, but when it comes down to it you have to develop skills that let you solve your problems independently. So again if you are going to take some old existing code you should at have a strong understand of how it works. Otherwise it's going to be tough. However IMO it's much easier if you start from something basic, and build it up yourself to achieve your goal. You will learn a lot more. The fact that you have come here several times and asked the same basic question should tell you something.
    19. khawk

      GDC 2019 Call for Submissions

      UBM Tech Game Network, the organizers of the Game Developers Conference (GDC) 2019, are accepting submissions to present lectures, roundtables, panels and tutorials from now until Thursday, August 16th at 11:59 PM PT. This will be the 33rd edition of GDC, the world’s largest and longest-running event for game developers, and organizers are keen to feature cutting-edge insights from experts across the game industry. GDC 2019 is returning to the Moscone Center in San Francisco, March 18-22, 2019. This is the initial call for submissions, which encompasses everything intended for the Main Conference Tracks on Wednesday-Friday, as well as day-long tutorials taking place Monday and Tuesday at GDC 2019. Proposals can be submitted via the official GDC website. Those interested in submitting for any of the GDC Summits (AI, Community Management, Educators, Game Narrative, Mobile, Indie, or UX) or VRDC (all of which take place on the Monday & Tuesday of the event) or Friday’s Game Career Seminar should know that the call for submissions will open later: August 30 through October 10, 2018. Select call for submissions for other Tutorials will also be open later in the year. The GDC Advisory Board is currently seeking submissions from game developers with expertise in any of the following tracks: Advocacy; Audio; Business & Marketing; Design; Production & Team Management; Programming; and Visual Arts. Those interested should first review the submission guidelines and track topics prior to submitting. They should also know that the submission process is divided into a three-phase system: Phase I – open call for submissions and initial advisory board review Phase II – submission declines or conditional Phase 2 acceptances sent, pending the submission of additional requested materials for advisory board review Phase III – review of Phase 2 resubmissions and final acceptances and declines sent The GDC Advisory Board will review and determine submissions based on the criteria of concept, depth, organization, credentials and takeaway. GDC organizers aim to achieve diversity of voice, experience and perspective. When considering who would be best to speak on behalf of a company or department, it is strongly encouraged to take this goal into consideration. For more details on the submission process or GDC 2019 in general visit the show’s official website, or subscribe to regular updates via Facebook, Twitter, or RSS. The GDC Vault website - www.gdcvault.com - offers access to a wide variety of GDC and VRDC@GDC 2018 lectures and sessions, including speaker slides, synchronized video and presentations for select sponsor lectures, as well as a broad range of free conference videos. GDC All Access Pass holders and individual Vault subscribers will get access to hundreds of video sessions from this and previous GDC shows. Official photos are available via the Official GDC Flickr account: www.flickr.com/photos/officialgdc/. View full story
    20. khawk

      GDC 2019 Call for Submissions

      UBM Tech Game Network, the organizers of the Game Developers Conference (GDC) 2019, are accepting submissions to present lectures, roundtables, panels and tutorials from now until Thursday, August 16th at 11:59 PM PT. This will be the 33rd edition of GDC, the world’s largest and longest-running event for game developers, and organizers are keen to feature cutting-edge insights from experts across the game industry. GDC 2019 is returning to the Moscone Center in San Francisco, March 18-22, 2019. This is the initial call for submissions, which encompasses everything intended for the Main Conference Tracks on Wednesday-Friday, as well as day-long tutorials taking place Monday and Tuesday at GDC 2019. Proposals can be submitted via the official GDC website. Those interested in submitting for any of the GDC Summits (AI, Community Management, Educators, Game Narrative, Mobile, Indie, or UX) or VRDC (all of which take place on the Monday & Tuesday of the event) or Friday’s Game Career Seminar should know that the call for submissions will open later: August 30 through October 10, 2018. Select call for submissions for other Tutorials will also be open later in the year. The GDC Advisory Board is currently seeking submissions from game developers with expertise in any of the following tracks: Advocacy; Audio; Business & Marketing; Design; Production & Team Management; Programming; and Visual Arts. Those interested should first review the submission guidelines and track topics prior to submitting. They should also know that the submission process is divided into a three-phase system: Phase I – open call for submissions and initial advisory board review Phase II – submission declines or conditional Phase 2 acceptances sent, pending the submission of additional requested materials for advisory board review Phase III – review of Phase 2 resubmissions and final acceptances and declines sent The GDC Advisory Board will review and determine submissions based on the criteria of concept, depth, organization, credentials and takeaway. GDC organizers aim to achieve diversity of voice, experience and perspective. When considering who would be best to speak on behalf of a company or department, it is strongly encouraged to take this goal into consideration. For more details on the submission process or GDC 2019 in general visit the show’s official website, or subscribe to regular updates via Facebook, Twitter, or RSS. The GDC Vault website - www.gdcvault.com - offers access to a wide variety of GDC and VRDC@GDC 2018 lectures and sessions, including speaker slides, synchronized video and presentations for select sponsor lectures, as well as a broad range of free conference videos. GDC All Access Pass holders and individual Vault subscribers will get access to hundreds of video sessions from this and previous GDC shows. Official photos are available via the Official GDC Flickr account: www.flickr.com/photos/officialgdc/.
    21. The documentation actually covers this: https://docs.unity3d.com/Manual/FormatDescription.html https://docs.unity3d.com/Manual/YAMLSceneExample.html https://docs.unity3d.com/Manual/ClassIDReference.html Projects used to default to binary files, but I think text is the default now. If your files are binary, you can switch them to text: https://docs.unity3d.com/Manual/class-EditorManager.html See: "Asset Serialization Mode".
    22. No, no announcements of any kind are necessary; the only requirement is that the source code needs to be from the same place as the binary. Just include it in a subdirectory with the binary and you'll be good. Or if you want to separate it (maybe because the source code is too large), just put a "source code" link next to the binary download (exact details will depend on how your customers pay for the game). Of course, I'm still not a lawyer, and this is still not legal advice, just my understanding of the license.
    23. Do I have to publicly announce the source code, or can I put it safely in a folder and not tell anyone about it?
    24. @Time4Tea have you looked into SmartFoxServer, since you mentioned you prefer to work in Java?
    25. I have learned a number of languages and libraries over the years. Languages Java Late 2014 Python Mid 2014 C++ Late 2015 HTML Mid 2017 Javascript Mid 2017 Graphics MS-DOS Graphics.h Early 2017 OpenGL (LWJGL) - Early 2016 OpenGL (C/C++) - Mid 2016 DirectX 12 - Late 2016 (Quit all projects and basically stopped using it) DirectX 9 - Early 2017 DirectX 11 - Late 2017 DirectX 10 - Early 2018 (Quit all projects) Nintendo 64 SDK - Mid 2018 (Deemed annoying due to the lack of a model loader... had to draw out data on a spreadsheet and it took too long) I have been doing computer programming for 4 years and graphics programming for 2 years...
    26. It seems a big shame to abandon it. You've got so much done compared to how much appears needed to improve it. At the very least you could put it out for free to get some fans, if it took off you could release a sequel. Or release a cut version for free and sell tracks for a few bucks like old shareware. Or a mobile version could be neat.
    27. I'm sorry, I don't entirely understand your comment. I know that my skills in the math required for game programming are not my strongest point, and so I am legitimately asking if anyone here knows of good resources for developing that skill.
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