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    1. Past hour
    2. Alberth

      I think my game is so terrible

      So your game is not bad, only the graphics are not so nice (A bad game would be a game that is not fun to play.) Assuming you use Pygame, did you have a look at the tutorials? https://www.pygame.org/wiki/tutorials The first entry "Tutorials by DR0ID" looks useful. At least https://dr0id.bitbucket.io/legacy/pygame_tutorial01.html draws an image to the screen, and flips the display (ie the back surface thingie).
    3. Ben Walker

      Home: Shellfish

      Home: Shellfish As part of our final project for Studio 2, we had to create a game based on one thing. Home. Home Project This was the second Home Project I was coding for, my creative input in this project was less than Coming and Going. Shellfish is about how it is okay to put your own well-being first, and as a result of that cut off any relationships that do more harm than good. Even if they happen to be family or your best friend. What went right 1. Art Design I can take no credit for this, the designer for this project is incredibly talented (at least in my eyes) at creating unique backgrounds and characters. Very quickly all of these was designed and implemented into the project. 2. Work Mini Game The designer wanted a monotonous work mini game, in which the player had to write out paper work on the computer to earn money. After elaborating on design documents and taking notes of what was needed, I was able to make a system which turned out to be pretty fun. I think part of the charm once again was the great accompanying visual aid. 3. Pivot In the last week the game took a design pivot, this didn’t alter any of the existing systems that were built but it did make more sense from a goal point of view. Previously a house was filled with items that you purchased, now you work to build a Rocket ship to take you away from your temporary home. Personally, I think this turned out much better, I really am invested in Goldie going to the moon 4. Audio The audio in this project was well sourced and came together quickly, the designer also made a bunch of their own, including music and sound effects. It adds a certain character to the game, which I think is designer personality in game form, which is something to celebrate. What went wrong 1. Planning As I mentioned previously, my involvement in this project was more of a when I’m needed basis. Which doesn’t mean I wasn’t available, it’s more like, information was trickled down to me over time about what was needed at that exact point. This made planning for this project difficult for me, especially as the designer was also doing some coding bits and pieces in-between points of communication. This wasn’t mine finest work from a coding standard point of view. 2. Communication Communication in work hours was fine, we would both actively seek each other if we wanted something or needed answers, which was great. However outside of class time, getting a hold of them was an issue which definitely slowed down progress. What can I learn from this? 1. Planning While information was sometimes limited, I could have definitely planned out my systems better, especially when modifications were needed for other functionality. Creating solid systems could avoid things becoming hacky in the end. 2. Communication I’m not really sure what I can learn here, as I mentioned before in class it was fine, outside I made my best efforts to communicate and update the designer what I was doing but it felt like a one-way street. I guess I could have communicated this better in class and come to an agreement or understanding of why this was. Conclusion This project has had its up and downs, but I certainly think its in a great spot now, the game is a delight. I’m pretty disappointed in my coding standards on this project but I’m taking this as a learning experience and strive to do better. Look forward to working with them again. Thanks for reading! Development stats · Developers: Jamison Bolling, Ben Walker · Link to Game: https://slemhosta.itch.io/shellfish · Length of development: 4 weeks · Development tools: Unity, visual studio, audacity, 3ds max,
    4. Ben Walker

      Home: Coming and Going

      Home: Coming and Going As part of our final project for Studio 2, we had to create a game based on one thing. Home. Home Project So we thought about what home meant to us all individually, in the end we came up with the concept that home can be many places, its about what’s comfortable to us. Home could be family, home could be a bed after a long day. We decided to focus on a family event and how it’s good to be back home but over time you feel less comfortable because its not your home anymore. We wanted to merge 3D environment and 2D art to help create a more pleasing environment, as 3D models can sometimes come across as quite alien by themselves and have no references to actual people being there, leaving that open allows the player to make their own assumptions or put themselves into that position. What went right 1. Initial Design Our design process was fast, within two days we had the feel for the game and some of the mini game mechanics planned out. All design documents were started soon after and by the end of the week we had already made a start on systems and building the game. This was possible due to a few reasons; · We were all passionate about the project · We clearly defined roles and tasks early · We communicated often and effectively Considering our time to develop was short, managing our time and creating things quickly was important. It meant we could then see our ideas play out and update anything that didn’t seem like it fit. 2. Mini games The mini games were planned early as well as the art for them, this gave us time to effectively make the main mechanics and also a large amount of time to polish them. Only the drinking games were designed later, and they went through a couple of stages before making a final decision on what they should look like. Here are some examples of the mini games: Drinking: Dishes: Dinner: 3. Core systems design As mentioned previously, we had great communication about the things we needed. Either things were designed as a group, or the designers would brainstorm ideas externally. I would sit down with both of them later and take a large number of notes of all the functionality and systems that I would need to make. The key here was clarity, sure I can read design documents all day, but somethings can be missed or lost in translation in a document. It’s important to work as closely as you can to make sure things are as intended. This resulted in solid modular main systems that could be used easily and effectively. //activity What went wrong 1. Complexity This came in two forms: System Complexity: After a couple of play tests, further functionality and new systems were wanted. As much as I tried to plan in advance all of the systems, there was things that I could never anticipate. I tried to separate the systems as much as possible but sometimes things had to get a little messy. Saying that though, none of the issues were massive and most just took a little problem solving. The largest issue we had was a Unity bug, which previously worked and then just decided not to. Project Complexity: We had a LOT of assets in this project which as things started piling up could become quite confusing. Objects were separated into their own sections but some of these sections had multiple sub sections of objects depending on what day it was in game and if it was night or not. 2. Merging of games One the designers implemented one of their previous games into the game, by copy and pasting all of it in...I think it goes without saying but don’t do this. Review and remove all the unnecessary scripts and assets first. It did turn out looking pretty good, it just took a bit to work out all of the kinks. 3. Collaboration with audio Audio was always going to be a major part of this project, as we don’t have physical people in the world, we have to tell stories through the environment. Unfortunately, none of the audio students wanted to collaborate with the home projects which was disappointing. This just meant we had to source our own audio. What can I learn from this? 1. Complexity This is kind of an inevitability, projects will become large and sometimes complex. The best we can do is plan out all systems to be modular and to cut interactions down to less systems. Also organising everything logically and according to a standard decided by the team. Its important everyone is on the same page. 2. Merging of Games If I have control over this, review and remove all the unnecessary scripts and assets first before putting it into the project otherwise making sure that its understood that large changes need to be discussed before being implemented. 3. Collaboration with audio This is an unfortunate fact of life, sometimes things don’t go to plan. I think the best steps we can take to avoid this again is to network more with audio students, either talking to this particular cohort that doesn’t want to collaborate with the projects or making new friends in different cohorts. Conclusion This project has been great, overall, I think Home really portrays the feeling and message we wanted, and the project was well managed and delivered on time. Another reason this has been so great is in part to do with the people I have been working with. Working with talented, passionate, like minded people, makes for easy work and a great working environment. 10/10 would work with them again. Thanks for reading! Development stats · Developers: Ben Walker, Brynn Clayton, Rebecka Jansson · Link to Game: https://mercworm.itch.io/coming-and-going · Length of development: 4 weeks · Development tools: Unity, visual studio, audacity, 3ds max,
    5. Today
    6. GWDev

      I think my game is so terrible

      Are you looking for help with your code or just general python tutorials? Maybe you can show us some example of your rendering code? Are you using a library?
    7. HunterGaming

      Unreal Engine 4: Level Streaming Demystified

      So I have finally got some level streaming to work in the project I'm working on. The next blog might be progress on it. But for now I want to explain quickly how level streaming is designed to work and how to get it to work for streaming just a single level. I have a small level that is too small to be broken into smaller pieces but large enough to take few seconds to load it. Like a lot of things the official docs are good but doesn't help for situations like mine. Level streaming is normally used to load and unload one level into another level. Making it easy to have large levels broken into pieces. You have just a small, whats referred to as a persistent level, to start and load other levels into and out of your persistent level as needed. So you set up a trigger so when the player walks through another part of the level is loaded. Is it a process that can be seen so you must take care to make sure the player can't see that level until its completely loaded. You have the option to load the level asynchronously or not by checking Should Block on Load. In order to set up level streaming you must add the level you want to stream to a list of levels. The level that is currently open at this point will automatically be chosen as the persistent level. The level that is currently loaded will automatically be selected as the persistent level. Once there you can click the Levels drop down menu to either create a new level, or load an already existing level, to add to the list. Levels added here will be the sub levels you want to load. For me right now its just one level called Downtown_L. Now there is a lot of good tutorials and documentation available on the internet but they all explain it from a standpoint of having large levels broken into small levels and loading/unloading as needed. There is not much out there explaining from the standpoint of a single level that is too large to just load using OpenLevel because it takes too mush time to load and blocks the main thread until its done loading. Which I think is where a lot of one-man-band indie developers are coming from as being the only person working on a game limits,somewhat how large levels can be. Unless your willing to spend large amounts of time on it. So how do you go about using this technology to load smaller single levels? Well what I did was create a completely empty level to use as the persistent level. So it loads super quickly. In begin play of that persistent level I show a loading screen. I should be able to eventually make the loading screen animated as level loading shouldn't be a blocking task now. After the loading screen is shown I immediately call LoadStreamLevel to load my single level into the empty level. Now it work. The empty level is loaded super quickly and shows the loading screen. Which currently is just text that says loading. But it stays there as the level is loaded and is removed once the level is finished loading. As its not blocking and I don't yet have a loading screen that blocks the whole screen, I can see the level being put together. It's kinda cool. I will be updating my loading screen next to make sure it blocks the whole screen and looks pretty to the player. Here is my begin play from the persistent level's level blueprint.
    8. Looks promising! Will try and integrate with my (entity based) engine as I do not want to spent a lot of time on the renderer part. Any MinGW support planned?
    9. In MonoGame I'm writing a shader for lighting and shadows in a 2D Platformer. A shadow will be drawn for each character for each light that hits said character. Because shadows from different lights can overlap the shadows are drawn to a texture where each pixel is a bitfield where each bit tells you if the pixel was reflected by a given light. In the lighting shader for each light, it only applies light if the bit for that light is not set at the given pixel. In order to not make for example 40 draw calls to draw 40 shadows if 40 lights overlapped a character, I batch shadows together into a VertexBuffer with the data specifying which light created the given shadow. In the shadow shader, it samples the render target I am drawing the shadows to and sets its own bit. My problem is that the changes from the previous shadows in the same batch aren't applied to the render target until after the draw call has completed. This results in the bitfield getting overwritten by shadows from other lights. If I could somehow sample the back buffer this wouldn't be a problem. Is there any way I can fix this without making a draw call for each shadow?
    10. Hello everyone, This is my first home project and it's now on beta stage. Comments, suggests, feedbacks would be very much appreciated! Ever played marbles when you were a kid? AR Marbles simulates the real-world marble shooter, combined with immersive Augmented Reality, unlimited playback, scene editor, global/custom leaderboard, and more. Explore a variety of feature enhancements. Enjoy cheers, trophies, and applauds. Claim your position on the daily leaderboard. Make your own playgrounds and share with friends. FREE TO PLAY! This game supports ARKit on iOS devices and ARCore on Android. It works on non-ARxxx enabled phones with classic 3D mode. Minimal Requirement: iOS 9.3+ and Android 5.1+ DOWNLOAD iOS If you like App Store: https://itunes.apple.com/us/app/ar-marbles/id1256955197?ls=1&mt=8 If you prefer Testflight: https://testflight.apple.com/join/3UAlFq4Q Android Beta test link (Google Play): https://play.google.com/apps/testing/com.gtt.marbles SCREENSHOTS
    11. I did write another post yesterday but decided to leave it because I was sure someone with more (a little) knowledge of this would pop up, anyway a bit more discussion because I am interested to know the answer myself: If you watch the movie 'hidden figures' one of the things that popped out is that they figured out using the euler method (which is what we use in game physics) was the key to solving the complex calculations needed for their problem. There is a more in depth discussion here (I don't understand any of it because I don't speak math). Whether they still use the euler method in the same way now I don't know, but it is a potential way of solving complex scenarios like interacting gravity from different planets (as long as you take into account the downside of euler method being the step sizes and inaccuracy due to this). Anyway, one possible way of deciding the most efficient trajectory to get towards a desired destination is simply to run a load of simulations. If you consider the closeless to the desired destination as a measure of success (and maybe time taken / fuel used), you can essentially do a shedload of simulations firing off your rocket in all possible directions / velocities and find out which gets you closest to your destination (goodness of fit). If you could do infinite simulations, you would be guaranteed to find the best answer. This is very inefficient, so for these kinds of problem there is often an optimization strategy to shortcut through the search space. You might for example run a very rough version of the simulation get a rough answer, then run more accurate versions around the rough answer etc. It is important to note that this type of optimization method doesn't guarantee you the 'best' solution, because often the strategy ends up getting stuck in local peaks of goodness of fit. This is actually analogous to the same thing which happens in evolution, and can lead to evolutionary dead ends and extinctions. Your optimization strategy may for example end up with a direct route to the destination, when the actual best method is to slingshot around another planet. I like to think this is what happens when han solo is making the calculations to make a jump to lightspeed: Anyway of course the potential trouble with this sort of approach of making calculations beforehand is both one of a potential performance blip, and the inability to cope with changing scenarios (perhaps an alien controlled asteroid, like in the Expanse). Whereas the feedback I originally suggested might result in a slightly suboptimal path but has no performance blip, and can deal with dynamic situations.
    12. When I use graphics in my Python , they look really nasty, and they flicker. I know that I am supposed to use a back surface or something, but I don''t know how to do it. I also need to know how to use bitmaps or some other graphics. Thanks
    13. Cool! Thanks for sharing!
    14. Gilles Meiresonne

      Inspiration for citybuilder game

      This sounds really nice, this gave me lots of ideas for the game. Thank you
    15. L. Spiro

      Yet another graphic engine

      You can’t kill Unity or Unreal Engine 4 with OpenGL * and DirectX 11. But if you have fun trying then go for it. L. Spiro
    16. Guy Fleegman

      Inspiration for citybuilder game

      Hey Gilles, From your screenshot and what you've described, I see a very simplistic city builder as the foundation for the game. At first, your people just go out and gather/scavenge for food and water, but then those things become integrated into the city as farms and wells. Traffic would be the people walking to and from, delivering the resources around... as well as patrolling guards, builders, etc. You'd need homes, farms, walls, barracks, etc. Paths (roads) take time to make, but allow for faster travel, otherwise people walk slowly through the landscape as they see fit. Players get to control how many people are recruited for certain jobs, but you never directly control them. You choose what and where to build things, but how effective they become depends on the availability of resources and the traffic congestion levels. I think if players controlled the people, it might be too similar to classic Warcraft, but keeping the game-play similar to SimCity with a simple resource gathering component, might be more interesting. And then, of course, there would be dealing with attacks on your city. These moments would create the chaos needed to make city design and upgrade choices a constant mix of do I build/layout for defense or expansion. Build too much and your hard work is destroyed, but defend too much and the strength of the attacks become overwhelming. These attacks would take the form of tribal warfare, resource stealing, sabotaging your paths and buildings, poisoning grain and water, mother nature, etc. The frequency of conflict is key. As far as a post-apocalyptic setting goes, would people be inhabiting old ruined cities? How much technology survived? Is it back to the stone age, but with mohawks and sunglasses? Would vehicles play into it, like Mad Max? Do the people need entertainment, like brothels and gladiator arenas? Are you the "mayor" of this city? Anyway, this is all just food for thought. Personally, I like the idea of a simulation over a typical RTS. Watching a city evolve in somewhat unpredictable ways on it's own has a lot of appeal to me, especially if the remnants of certain things lingered long afterwards. Dead bodies littering the fields, burnt farm lands and forests, land turn up a bit from an earthquake. Seeing the story of your survival in the landscape itself, basically. And that's all I got.
    17. You can somehow using reflection as mentioned above but I don't recommend to do that because runtime performance would be terrible. You can also put all of those functions into a Dictionary<string, Delegate> and use that to maybe do things like RunSomething["action"](); but again, runtime performance would be terrible. The closest you can come to is using another class to wrap your functions into so you end up with MyClass.RunSomething.Action(); Anything else is reserved for runtime resolved scripting languages
    18. DiligentDev

      Yet another graphic engine

      I can't really tell you much about LLGL, but my impression is that it is mostly an experimental project. You can take a look at the code samples, compare it to Diligent samples and figure out what works best for you. Speaking about Diligent, all its 5 rendering backends are feature complete at this point on all 6 supported platforms. The engine is thoroughly tested and optimized. What to shader converter, it is only really used on OpenGL backend. On Vulkan, HLSL is compiled directly to SPIRV using glslang (or you can use any other compiler such as DXC). You can really supply compiled HLSL or SPIRV bytecode directly. Or you can use GLSL with OpenGL/Vulkan backends. I am not sure what you mean by using "c preprocessor for more transparent compilation". If you are talking about using macros to produce HLSL and GLSL from the same file, then believe me this is not going to be transparent. I am not really sure what your goal is. If you want to learn the APIs and figure out why the industry moved away from DX11 and OpenGL to DX12 and Vulkan, you can find your own way. If you want to build a renderer and concentrate on rendering part, then using existing low-level library, being it Diligent, LLGL, bgfx or any other framework will save you a lot of time.
    19. Sure you can. The key word here is Reflection. You can inspect all your classes, members, etc. You're looking for invoking a method. Lookie here: https://docs.microsoft.com/en-us/dotnet/api/system.type.invokemember?view=netframework-4.7.2
    20. lukash

      Yet another graphic engine

      Hi DiligentDev! Very interesting project, but let we ask some questions. How does it relates to LLGL (https://github.com/LukasBanana/LLGL)? What is difference, pros, cons? Also what is the endpoint goal of this project? Is there some engines that use these API? I see that you use a shader converter for targeting to different API, but I do not like this approach and prefer c preprocessor for more transparent compilation. I agree that dx 11, opengl 4.5 rather old-school, but for my purposes I don't see any restrictions in these API for implementing all graphics techniques.
    21. I'm very interested in the snow physics in Red Dead Redemption 2. Here is a demo video from YouTube. Does anyone know the techniques behind this snow physics? For example, What is the shading model of the snow? How do they create snow deformation?
    22. Gnollrunner

      Newtonian physics & spacecraft control

      Yeah I'm getting the idea that this is pretty good advice. Thanks.
    23. Zakwayda

      which should i select first

      I agree with 1024 that more info might be useful (for example what platforms you want to target). But, I'll go ahead and say that of the options you listed, I think option 2 (JS) may have the lowest barrier to entry. That's subjective of course, and others may disagree. But, I do think in-browser development using JS can be a reasonable starting point, and you can always branch out to other libraries/platforms/languages as you progress.
    24. babaliaris

      AMD ATI atioglxx.dll access violation (Bug???)

      Obviously I don't know anything about image formats and what a channel is. Do you know a good place to learn more about that? Does this relates to what you said about the channels (stb_load last parameter).
    25. Yes, the width, height and format (RGB is 3 byes, RGBA is 4 bytes). Your code might be incorrect if you load a greyscale image -- it would load one byte per pixel, and then GL would try to read 3 or 4 bytes per pixel. The final parameter of stbi_load (0 in your code) tells it how many channels that you want the loaded data to have -- you should probably be using something like "trans ? 4 : 3" instead of "0" there.
    26. ArcanaDragon

      New Hero Added 12-11-2018

      New hero added: Classic Sylv MC Game Link: Click here
    27. babaliaris

      AMD ATI atioglxx.dll access violation (Bug???)

      Texture::Texture(std::string path, bool trans, int unit) { //Reverse the pixels. stbi_set_flip_vertically_on_load(1); //Try to load the image. unsigned char *data = stbi_load(path.c_str(), &m_width, &m_height, &m_channels, 0); //Image loaded successfully. if (data) { //Generate the texture and bind it. GLCall(glGenTextures(1, &m_id)); GLCall(glActiveTexture(GL_TEXTURE0 + unit)); GLCall(glBindTexture(GL_TEXTURE_2D, m_id)); //Not Transparent texture. if (!trans) { GLCall(glTexImage2D(GL_TEXTURE_2D, 0, GL_RGB, m_width, m_height, 0, GL_RGB, GL_UNSIGNED_BYTE, data)); } //Transparent texture. else { GLCall(glTexImage2D(GL_TEXTURE_2D, 0, GL_RGBA, m_width, m_height, 0, GL_RGBA, GL_UNSIGNED_BYTE, data)); } //Texture Filters. GLCall(glTexParameteri(GL_TEXTURE_2D, GL_TEXTURE_WRAP_S, GL_REPEAT)); GLCall(glTexParameteri(GL_TEXTURE_2D, GL_TEXTURE_WRAP_T, GL_REPEAT)); GLCall(glTexParameteri(GL_TEXTURE_2D, GL_TEXTURE_MIN_FILTER, GL_NEAREST_MIPMAP_NEAREST)); GLCall(glTexParameteri(GL_TEXTURE_2D, GL_TEXTURE_MAG_FILTER, GL_LINEAR)); //Generate mipmaps. GLCall(glGenerateMipmap(GL_TEXTURE_2D)); } //Loading Failed. else throw VampEngine::EngineError("The was an error loading image: " + path); //Unbind the texture. GLCall(glBindTexture(GL_TEXTURE_2D, 0)); //Free the image data. stbi_image_free(data); } The thing is that never happened before using the above code. Can it be the fault of the image file? Maybe some corrupted bytes? Now that you mentioned that, GlTexImage2D() takes the data pointer, the width and the height of the image. How does this function know how many bytes to read from the data buffer? Can it calculate it using the width and the height? GlTexImage2D Doc
    28. I'm sorry I can not find that... All I see is a LINK icon near the quotes that only takes text and a button at the bottom of the post box "insert other media" and it only has two options.. neither of which is "display as link"... can you please try explaining again for me? - EDIT - Oh if I paste the image url directly into the edit window this comes up... but clicking it sets it to a text url link instead of seeing the image. Solution To be clear I want to see the image.. but when they click on it I want them to load a Link... (edited OP for clarity) Worked it out.. pasting directly into the post body was the trick... Paste your image URL directly into the post body. There is a small popup, click the X to dismiss. Double click on the image. This has now loaded a new window, different from the manual insert image window, that allows you to set URLs for linking.
    29. You should get the option under the input box after posting an image link... "Your link has been automatically embedded. Display as a link instead"
    30. Hi there.... I can make links on my GameDev.net Blogs... I can insert an image into the blog using a offsite URL BUT...Is there a way to insert an image but have it as a clickable link? So you see the image and if you click on it, it loads a link. Solution Worked it out.. pasting directly into the post body was the trick... Paste your image URL directly into the post body. There is a small popup, click the X to dismiss. Double click on the image. This has now loaded a new window, different from the manual insert image window, that allows you to set URLs for linking. (thanks to : fleabay)
    31. Hello!! I like blogging and generally assuming people are listening to me... but I also like things to look cool. I wanted a quick and easy way to make Banner Images for my new GameDev.Net Blog... so I created a PSD Template for that. Basically there are two safe frames... One is for Thumbnail and the other is for Banner. Just make sure your final image looks good with both those layers turned on and you are fine!. There is also a hidden layer called "copy". This is just a simple way to save a selection set. Ctrl+Click on it to select the actual area you need to save an upload. Load up PSD Paste in your Art under the BANNER SAFE and THUMBNAIL SAFE layer.... then scale and arrange it to look cool Turn on the THUMBNAIL SAFE layer to see how it looks as a thumbnail. Turn off the THUMBNAIL SAFE layer Hold Ctrl+Click on the COPY layer tp set the correct selection. CTRL+SHIFT+C (copy all) CTRL+N (New Document) CTRL+S (Save) Hope you like it! --A4L Download the PSD from my Google Drive
    32. Septopus

      Hello Unity + WebGL + Kongregate, goodbye sanity.

      Hmm, guess I just needed to sleep on it.. First change I made and I'm now saving and loading race courses on Kongregate!! WOOOO!! okay.. now.. Lots of tweaks still need to happen before I give out the link to anybody.. This is going to be awesome!! Their system already has a rating system and social sharing for all of the shared content. Perfect!
    33. xic777

      first game ever made

      thanks alot man means a ton, i hope not to make the same mistakes for the next one and add in the flavour i was missing in there cuz if i don't i'll be making the same repetive mistake
    34. NikitaSadkov

      I hate dialogue systems

      Check out https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Façade_(video_game) That is an unique game, in that it uses natural language processing, so player can refer to any object in the scene. Although in many cases it fails: for example when player types "watermelon", game characters treat that as reference to boobs and get insulted.
    35. I don't think so... That being said, I'm not really well versed on anything but day-to-day practical c#.. so, maybe I'm wrong.? In order for this to work it would have to be a HUGE feature of the compiler. The only circumstance that I know of where object names are altered is in the compile stage when Obfuscation is used to hide the names/purposes of the code to make de-compilation harder..
    36. Septopus

      Hello Unity + WebGL + Kongregate, goodbye sanity.

      I'm incredibly surprised so far, after killing the dynamic lighting and reducing the numbers of objects in the scene(trick glitter, excessive numbers of course barriers), which I needed to do for PC anyhow, I'm hitting 30+fps. I have it capped there to save cpu/etc.. so I dunno how fast it will go, but no issues.. It plays at least as well as it does compiled for win32, in a browser tab... haha. Same performance running locally vs. on Kongregate too, fwiw.(not considering load times that is).. Hoping I can figure out the JavaScript API bits I'm struggling with and get it published for y'all to check out sometime tonight. With how well it's performing so far, I'm thinking that instead of releasing several platforms at once, I'm just going to focus on getting WebGL going with the Kongregate API, then I'll be able to focus more on a solid social gaming experience with one platform and see how successful I can make it. Then when I get MY server up and running I can update it with some full client/server goodness that I can make work across all platforms seamlessly.
    37. If you get a crash inside a dll with a name like "nv something gl something dll" or "amd something gl something dll", then yeah, that's inside your GL driver. 99% of the time, it's your bug that's caused the crash, not theirs. For example, if you've passed a pointer to a buffer into the driver (e.g. to tell it to copy some pixel data out of that buffer), but the pointer isn't actually valid to read from, then the driver will crash when it tries to read from it. The crash occurs in the driver, but the bug is in your code (passing invalid pointers to the driver). Seeing this is to do with texture loading, I would guess that you've somehow asked the driver to read more pixel than actually exist within your memory allocation.
    38. Yesterday
    39. Is it possible to use variables strings to change member calls in your code? For example... say you have a few members in your class called RunSomthing_Start() RunSomthing_Process() RunSomthing_End() is there a way to call them with somthing like this in code elsewhere in your project? action = "_Start"; classObject.RunSomething+action(); action = "_Process"; classObject.RunSomething+action(); action = "_End"; classObject.RunSomething+action(); I know you can use parameters.. like action = "_Start"; classObject.RunSomething(action); action = "_Process"; classObject.RunSomething(action); action = "_End"; classObject.RunSomething(action); This is more just a curiosity question... like can you use string functions like you have in Console.Write(); to append stuff onto the name of Functions and Variables? int object_+getObjectID() = someValue. So the actual variable has a unique name based on the object.. not just the value in the variable.
    40. Vesnican

      Heroes of Flatlandia

      Want to play an epic turned based strategy inspired by games like Heroes of might and magic or Age of Wonders? Enter a fantasy world of Heroes of Flatlandia, where you lead your kingdom of noble elves or dreadful undeads as one of several powerful heroes. Raise mighty armies and crash your enemies in detailed tactical battles. Use variety of spells and abilities to gain advantage, explore the world, and conquer your enemies. The game contains plenty of maps and allow you to play either against computer AI or against your friends in hot-seat multiplayer.Game Features• Fantasy turned based strategy• Detailed tactical battles• Two distinct races of elves and undeads• 14 different units and 4 playable heroes• Cunning AI to outsmart• Hot-seat multiplayer• Tens of spells and special abilities• Stunning fairy tale graphics• No microtransactions Trailer Google Playdemo version - https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.HighlandStudio.HeroesOfFlatlandiafull version - https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.HighlandStudio.HeroesOfFlatlandia1App Store(only full version) https://itunes.apple.com/us/app/heroes-of-flatlandia/id1445838121?ls=1&mt=8
    41. Rutin

      Hello Unity + WebGL + Kongregate, goodbye sanity.

      I never tried Unity WebGL, let me know how the performance is.
    42. Hello! I was trying to load some textures and I was getting this access violation atioglxx.dll access violation stb image which i'm using to load the png file into the memory, was not reporting any errors. I found this on the internet explaining that it is a bug from AMD. I fixed that problem by changing the image file which i was using. The image that was causing this issue was generated by this online converter from gif to pngs. Does anyone know more about it? Thank you.
    43. Vesnican

      Heroes of Flatlandia

      Want to play an epic turned based strategy inspired by games like Heroes of might and magic or Age of Wonders? Enter a fantasy world of Heroes of Flatlandia, where you lead your kingdom of noble elves or dreadful undeads as one of several powerful heroes. Raise mighty armies and crash your enemies in detailed tactical battles. Use variety of spells and abilities to gain advantage, explore the world, and conquer your enemies. The game contains plenty of maps and allow you to play either against computer AI or against your friends in hot-seat multiplayer.Game Features• Fantasy turned based strategy• Detailed tactical battles• Two distinct races of elves and undeads• 14 different units and 4 playable heroes• Cunning AI to outsmart• Hot-seat multiplayer• Tens of spells and special abilities• Stunning fairy tale graphics• No microtransactions
    44. Septopus

      Inspiration for citybuilder game

      What if you treated the "inside city walls" and "outside city walls" as separate game simulations unless the walls get torn down or damaged. Then you could more or less allow the player to decide which game-play they feel like participating in at the moment. If they want to fight and gather resources then they can go outside the city. Of they want to focus on building, stay inside. Then you could have breaches and wall damage act like natural disasters in SIM games. Forcing the player to respond at random times. Just some ideas.
    45. Gilles Meiresonne

      Inspiration for citybuilder game

      Kind of. I was thinking to do something like Clash of Clans, or like They are Billions. But need to find a right way of implemening it to keep a balance between defence and general city simulating.
    46. Hi everybody, Xilvan Design building 3D games since 2004 in Blitz3D, we now present you our kindly official gaming related pages. (please click on each links, download games & bookmark the pages): Lights of Dreams IV: Far Above the Clouds v10.27. Candy World II: Another Golden Bones v10.27. Candy Racing Cup: The Lillians Rallies v3.57. Candy World Adventures IV: The Mirages of Starfield v7.97. Candy to the Rescue IV: The Scepter of Thunders v7.97. Candy's Space Adventures: The Messages from the Lillians v18.27. Candy's Space Mysteries II: New Mission on the earth-likes Planets v8.57. New Xilvan Design Websites. Xilvan Design's Youtube Channel. Friendly, Alexandre L., Xilvan Design.
    47. We currently are a team of 2 C-Sharp programmers, An experienced 3D modeler/Level Designer, 1 2D Artist/Writer (talking to one more to join) and and a Sound Designer.I alone will be handling some of the 3d design, level design, writing, audio, particle systems, publishing, marketing and managing the entire project. First a little about me. I'm mainly a 3D Designer/ Level Designer that also knows how to code in C-Sharp a little (basic stuff, triggering events, animations, moving objects etc). I've made 2 games with unity, A fairly complex block breaker that I took down and this https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.testing.colorvfour&hl=en. I've attached a pic from the developmental stages of the block breaker. It will be a first person game where the player explores their surroundings and has objectives that they need to complete to progress. A little similar to "Life is strange".I do not want to give out a lot of details right now but rest assured its an authentic and interesting idea. Hmu if you are interested and then we can discuss the details. We'll be using Unity 3D and C-Sharp. 3D Designers can use any software they like but Blender 3D is preferred ps. This project will take time so please only apply if you think you can do it, I do not want team members leaving the project midway as that can be devastating. Once we raise funds from the kickstarter we can start outsourcing tasks and start working fulltime(paid) on the project. I hope that this will be a great learning experience and a profitable endeavor for us all. Needed: 2 Experienced 3D modelers/Level Designers for characters and environments (This also includes Animation) 2 Experiended C-Sharp programmers. (This will include making inventory systems, character controllers and basically everything related to programming) These are just some pictures from a practice scene I did a while back in my free time obvs didn't put in much effort
    48. Organizers of the 19th Annual Game Developers Choice Awards, the premier accolades for peer recognition celebrating the industry’s top games, studios and developers, will be honoring esteemed writer and director Amy Hennig with the Lifetime Achievement Award. The Game Developers Choice Awards ceremony takes place on Wednesday, March 20, 2019 at 6:30pm at the San Francisco Moscone Center during the 2019 Game Developers Conference, and in conjunction with the Independent Games Festival (IGF). The ceremonies are available to attend for all GDC 2019 pass-holders. Over the course of more than three decades, Amy has established a multifaceted career in game development, starting with development on the Atari 7800 up to the modern PlayStation 4 platform. Amy’s expertise is as deep as it is varied, with professional experience as a digital artist, animator, game designer and especially in the last two decades, as a writer and director of acclaimed adventure titles with strong narrative and character elements. Serving as the creative director and writer of Naughty Dog’s Uncharted game series, her contributions helped that series become one of the most acclaimed and beloved in the modern gaming era. Before that, Amy served as writer and director of the groundbreaking Soul Reaver / Legacy of Kain series at Crystal Dynamics during her more than eight year tenure with the company. Amy has earned countless accolades for her writing from prestigious organizations including the WGA Videogame Writing Awards and BAFTA, the latter of which also rewarded Amy with a Special Award in recognition for her contribution to the video game industry. “Amy Hennig is a powerful figure in the game world; her work exemplifies what good game narrative can be, with pathos, humor, suspense and energy. She is truly one of the most influential developers in the games industry,” said Katie Stern, general manager of the Game Developers Conference. “These past accomplishments are just milestones in a career that we’ll be following for years to come, but for one night at the GDCAs, we’ll reflect on the hard work and artistry that makes game developers like Amy the heart of the industry.” Previous recipients of the Lifetime Achievement Award recipients include Tim Schafer, Tim Sweeney, Shigeru Miyamoto, Warren Spector, John Carmack, Hironobu Sakaguchi, Hideo Kojima, Sid Meier, Ken Kutaragi, Dr. Ray Muzyka and Dr. Greg Zeschuk and Peter Molyneux, among others. The recipients of the Lifetime Achievement are chosen by the Game Developers Choice Special Awards Jury, which includes notable game industry leaders such as Chris Charla (ID@Xbox), Laine Nooney (New York University), Brian Reynolds (Big Huge Games), Brandon Sheffield (Necrosoft Games) and Mare Sheppard (Metanet Software). For more information about the 19th annual Game Developers Choice Awards, visit: http://www.gamechoiceawards.com/. For more details on the Game Developers Conference, please visit the GDC’s official website, or subscribe to regular updates via Facebook, Twitter, or RSS. Official photos are available via the Official GDC Flickr account: www.flickr.com/photos/officialgdc/. Both the Game Developers Choice Awards and IGF ceremonies are available to attend for all GDC 2019 pass-holders.
    49. Organizers of the 19th Annual Game Developers Choice Awards, the premier accolades for peer recognition celebrating the industry’s top games, studios and developers, will be honoring esteemed writer and director Amy Hennig with the Lifetime Achievement Award. The Game Developers Choice Awards ceremony takes place on Wednesday, March 20, 2019 at 6:30pm at the San Francisco Moscone Center during the 2019 Game Developers Conference, and in conjunction with the Independent Games Festival (IGF). The ceremonies are available to attend for all GDC 2019 pass-holders. Over the course of more than three decades, Amy has established a multifaceted career in game development, starting with development on the Atari 7800 up to the modern PlayStation 4 platform. Amy’s expertise is as deep as it is varied, with professional experience as a digital artist, animator, game designer and especially in the last two decades, as a writer and director of acclaimed adventure titles with strong narrative and character elements. Serving as the creative director and writer of Naughty Dog’s Uncharted game series, her contributions helped that series become one of the most acclaimed and beloved in the modern gaming era. Before that, Amy served as writer and director of the groundbreaking Soul Reaver / Legacy of Kain series at Crystal Dynamics during her more than eight year tenure with the company. Amy has earned countless accolades for her writing from prestigious organizations including the WGA Videogame Writing Awards and BAFTA, the latter of which also rewarded Amy with a Special Award in recognition for her contribution to the video game industry. “Amy Hennig is a powerful figure in the game world; her work exemplifies what good game narrative can be, with pathos, humor, suspense and energy. She is truly one of the most influential developers in the games industry,” said Katie Stern, general manager of the Game Developers Conference. “These past accomplishments are just milestones in a career that we’ll be following for years to come, but for one night at the GDCAs, we’ll reflect on the hard work and artistry that makes game developers like Amy the heart of the industry.” Previous recipients of the Lifetime Achievement Award recipients include Tim Schafer, Tim Sweeney, Shigeru Miyamoto, Warren Spector, John Carmack, Hironobu Sakaguchi, Hideo Kojima, Sid Meier, Ken Kutaragi, Dr. Ray Muzyka and Dr. Greg Zeschuk and Peter Molyneux, among others. The recipients of the Lifetime Achievement are chosen by the Game Developers Choice Special Awards Jury, which includes notable game industry leaders such as Chris Charla (ID@Xbox), Laine Nooney (New York University), Brian Reynolds (Big Huge Games), Brandon Sheffield (Necrosoft Games) and Mare Sheppard (Metanet Software). For more information about the 19th annual Game Developers Choice Awards, visit: http://www.gamechoiceawards.com/. For more details on the Game Developers Conference, please visit the GDC’s official website, or subscribe to regular updates via Facebook, Twitter, or RSS. Official photos are available via the Official GDC Flickr account: www.flickr.com/photos/officialgdc/. Both the Game Developers Choice Awards and IGF ceremonies are available to attend for all GDC 2019 pass-holders. View full story
    50. Guy Fleegman

      Inspiration for citybuilder game

      Are you suggesting a city builder with tower defence mechanics?
    51. Dialogue systems suck. I hate them. I have been working on one for a project and it is just so frustrating! I finally got it just barely working, but it's the most hacked together bullshit dialogue system possible and I don't even really understand how it works. I'm just glad I can forget about it for a while, and work on the rest of the game.
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