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      Download the Game Design and Indie Game Marketing Freebook   07/19/17

      GameDev.net and CRC Press have teamed up to bring a free ebook of content curated from top titles published by CRC Press. The freebook, Practices of Game Design & Indie Game Marketing, includes chapters from The Art of Game Design: A Book of Lenses, A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing, and An Architectural Approach to Level Design. The GameDev.net FreeBook is relevant to game designers, developers, and those interested in learning more about the challenges in game development. We know game development can be a tough discipline and business, so we picked several chapters from CRC Press titles that we thought would be of interest to you, the GameDev.net audience, in your journey to design, develop, and market your next game. The free ebook is available through CRC Press by clicking here. The Curated Books The Art of Game Design: A Book of Lenses, Second Edition, by Jesse Schell Presents 100+ sets of questions, or different lenses, for viewing a game’s design, encompassing diverse fields such as psychology, architecture, music, film, software engineering, theme park design, mathematics, anthropology, and more. Written by one of the world's top game designers, this book describes the deepest and most fundamental principles of game design, demonstrating how tactics used in board, card, and athletic games also work in video games. It provides practical instruction on creating world-class games that will be played again and again. View it here. A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing, by Joel Dreskin Marketing is an essential but too frequently overlooked or minimized component of the release plan for indie games. A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing provides you with the tools needed to build visibility and sell your indie games. With special focus on those developers with small budgets and limited staff and resources, this book is packed with tangible recommendations and techniques that you can put to use immediately. As a seasoned professional of the indie game arena, author Joel Dreskin gives you insight into practical, real-world experiences of marketing numerous successful games and also provides stories of the failures. View it here. An Architectural Approach to Level Design This is one of the first books to integrate architectural and spatial design theory with the field of level design. The book presents architectural techniques and theories for level designers to use in their own work. It connects architecture and level design in different ways that address the practical elements of how designers construct space and the experiential elements of how and why humans interact with this space. Throughout the text, readers learn skills for spatial layout, evoking emotion through gamespaces, and creating better levels through architectural theory. View it here. Learn more and download the ebook by clicking here. Did you know? GameDev.net and CRC Press also recently teamed up to bring GDNet+ Members up to a 20% discount on all CRC Press books. Learn more about this and other benefits here.
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It Just Works(TM) (for the most part)

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Schmedly

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So I took a chance and upgraded my Ubuntu installation from 5.10 to 6.6. And by upgraded ladies and gents, I mean a clean install, as there truly is no other way to install an OS. Maybe it's just that I'm fractionally more familiar with it, and conscious of the fact that I'm going to HAVE to open a shell to issue a half dozen commands, but this install was by far the quickest from blank partition to working development environment.

The default setup provides a good base, and the subsequent updates were painless. I still dislike searching through innumerable packages with Synaptic, but and once the basic dev tools (gcc, g++, headers, etc) were installed the only imperative that remained was the video drivers. Been there done that, wrote it down. Nvidia driver install was not an issue, but that's not to say it can't be greatly improved upon.

After the miserable failure of MinGW Dev Studio to do anything whatsoever on 5.10 without crashing, I had downloaded and installed Borland's C++ IDE. Atrocious interface aside, it worked. But before I went that route again, I wanted to give Code::Blocks a try. Last time an install would have required compiling it from source, which is not something I was (or am) willing to sacrifice any of my time for. Let's face it, life is too short and my family is too important for me to waste time compiling something which amounts to a trivial pursuit.

I looked... lo and behold, there was a recent nightly build in a Debian package. What happened next was beyond my wildest dreams. I downloaded it, the Debian package installer opened, Code::Blocks landed on the hard drive and was added to the development tools menu. I opened the IDE up, converted a simple Visual Studio solution and the thing just worked. Amazing.

Suffice to say I'm impressed, as it basically Just Works(TM). This environment is very livable if not slightly more compelling than it has been in the past. Mind you, I still think Linux has a 'slapped together' feel about it, but for now I'll say that if I HAD to work with it, I would consider it far less painful (maybe even enjoyable) than it has ever been.

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Ubuntu dist-upgrade is really easy. It's one of the biggest reasons I use Ubuntu; it's easy as all hell moving from 5.x to 6.x. A fresh install is utterly unnecessary.

GNOME is making leaps and bounds in usability; just wait until GNOME 3.0 and it'll practically be as nice as OS X is right now (rather than a poor Windows clone). Code::Blocks is also making some progress, and I'd be surprised if it didn't become one of the more prominent non-Windows development environments.
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Original post by Ravuya
Ubuntu dist-upgrade is really easy. It's one of the biggest reasons I use Ubuntu; it's easy as all hell moving from 5.x to 6.x. A fresh install is utterly unnecessary.

But does it flush out all of the unnecessary crap I may have installed when "trial-and-error"ing it last time around....
Quote:
GNOME is making leaps and bounds in usability; just wait until GNOME 3.0 and it'll practically be as nice as OS X is right now

You mean it'll be very polished yet ever so slightly slow on the repaint? :)
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I was "Stumbling" recently and came across yet another Linux distribution. I thought to myself "stay away... Linux always sounds like a good idea, but it's just going to piss you off." Anyway, long story short, that distro I stumbled upon just happened to be Ubuntu 6.06 and I can't believe how far Linux has come over the last few years. I was able to repartition my HD (with XP on it) without any problems, all of my hardware worked immediately, etc, etc. Absolutely incredible. I used to always use Linux + KDE so I installed kubuntu-desktop from Synaptic. Ugh! I used to dislike gnome but now I love it. It feels much more stable than KDE and just seems more "mature" overall.

I can't believe I'm using Linux again... Ubuntu just makes the entire experience quite nice.
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