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      Download the Game Design and Indie Game Marketing Freebook   07/19/17

      GameDev.net and CRC Press have teamed up to bring a free ebook of content curated from top titles published by CRC Press. The freebook, Practices of Game Design & Indie Game Marketing, includes chapters from The Art of Game Design: A Book of Lenses, A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing, and An Architectural Approach to Level Design. The GameDev.net FreeBook is relevant to game designers, developers, and those interested in learning more about the challenges in game development. We know game development can be a tough discipline and business, so we picked several chapters from CRC Press titles that we thought would be of interest to you, the GameDev.net audience, in your journey to design, develop, and market your next game. The free ebook is available through CRC Press by clicking here. The Curated Books The Art of Game Design: A Book of Lenses, Second Edition, by Jesse Schell Presents 100+ sets of questions, or different lenses, for viewing a game’s design, encompassing diverse fields such as psychology, architecture, music, film, software engineering, theme park design, mathematics, anthropology, and more. Written by one of the world's top game designers, this book describes the deepest and most fundamental principles of game design, demonstrating how tactics used in board, card, and athletic games also work in video games. It provides practical instruction on creating world-class games that will be played again and again. View it here. A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing, by Joel Dreskin Marketing is an essential but too frequently overlooked or minimized component of the release plan for indie games. A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing provides you with the tools needed to build visibility and sell your indie games. With special focus on those developers with small budgets and limited staff and resources, this book is packed with tangible recommendations and techniques that you can put to use immediately. As a seasoned professional of the indie game arena, author Joel Dreskin gives you insight into practical, real-world experiences of marketing numerous successful games and also provides stories of the failures. View it here. An Architectural Approach to Level Design This is one of the first books to integrate architectural and spatial design theory with the field of level design. The book presents architectural techniques and theories for level designers to use in their own work. It connects architecture and level design in different ways that address the practical elements of how designers construct space and the experiential elements of how and why humans interact with this space. Throughout the text, readers learn skills for spatial layout, evoking emotion through gamespaces, and creating better levels through architectural theory. View it here. Learn more and download the ebook by clicking here. Did you know? GameDev.net and CRC Press also recently teamed up to bring GDNet+ Members up to a 20% discount on all CRC Press books. Learn more about this and other benefits here.
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I used to be a member here

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capn_midnight

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This was me back then, in the year 2002:
2002.jpg


And this is me now, 12 years later:

2014.gif



So what happened in between?

Well, after getting my degree in Computer Science, I ended up bouncing around between jobs. I've had--depending on how you count--6 to 8 jobs in the last twelve years. Most of them sucked. I got depressed from this, thinking it was my fault, that my work problems were because I didn't have the discipline to get out of bed in the morning. Turns out that there was a global conspiracy to give the middle class the shaft and I couldn't get out of bed in the morning because my bosses were universally assholes.

I flitted around the Mid-Atlantic region for a while. Living at home with my parents, renting a place with coworkers, living at home with my parents again, forcing myself out by moving to a completely different city, losing everything I owned in a flood, breaking up with almost all of my friends from childhood, getting fired for the first time from a job (for not looking like I was busy enough, despite the fact that my work provided most of the revenue to the company), living on friends couches and basements and spare rooms for a while, tusling with the decision of whether or not to become a fulltime alcaholic, experimenting with online dating--an experience that got too close to receiving violence on too many occasions for my liking--and just generally kissing the nose of complete destruction.

So I resolved I would always do things my own way and not have a boss ever again. I took about a 4 month sabbatical (and by that, I mean that is all the longer my unemployment benefits lasted, thus forcing me to find gainful employment) where I taught myself how to motivate myself for work. I sold t-shirts for a while. I made props for museums. I got some consulting gigs. I now have one major client who pays all my bills. I'm completely out of debt--no cars, no student loans, no credit cards.

And I got married to a woman who fills me with so much love and provides me with such an amazing base of rationality and sanity that it almost seems like the 10 years prior to her never even happened.

I now live with her just outside of our nation's capitol. I could be healthier, but overall, my life is really great now. I'm writing a lot lately, and I do a lot of photography and artwork when I'm not programming and actually finishing projects on a regular basis. I work from home, frequently not putting pants on all day. Most people in Northern Virginia either works for the government or works for a company that works for the government, people who I get to make extremely jealous with my beard, long hair, and carefree spirit. And that feels like winning.

So am I back? Sure, I guess you can call it something like that. Why am I here? I can't predict the future and know that I will post here regularly again. I only post this now because I see there are still some people here who would presumably remember my name and might have wondered what happened to me. I don't want to come in acting like "I'm an old, wisened master, bow before my wisening". I guess I'm here to learn again.

Here, this place, where I first learned.

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It's always nice to hear that someone is doing good. :)

 

Your beard makes me envious. ;) How long did it take -- 2, 3 years? Been working on mine for almost a year and it's no-where near as EPIC as yours.

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The picture is, uh, actually a couple of months old. So I guess that picture is about 6 months of growth.

 

It's good. It's been cold here. Not that I've gone outside anytime in the last 48 hours, but if I were to do such, I'd like to think my face would stay warm.

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Welcome back!

 

Sounds like you've had quite a journey, good to hear things are going well for you! :)

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I'm happy for you! I remember your "goodbye" post from a while back. Good to see things turned around for you.

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Actually, I never really wrote a "goodby from GameDev.net" post. I had a "good by from programming" post, but that lasted all of two weeks when I finally got some sunlight and vitamin D in me and went straight back into programming for myself. It's been THREE years since that happened.

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