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      Download the Game Design and Indie Game Marketing Freebook   07/19/17

      GameDev.net and CRC Press have teamed up to bring a free ebook of content curated from top titles published by CRC Press. The freebook, Practices of Game Design & Indie Game Marketing, includes chapters from The Art of Game Design: A Book of Lenses, A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing, and An Architectural Approach to Level Design. The GameDev.net FreeBook is relevant to game designers, developers, and those interested in learning more about the challenges in game development. We know game development can be a tough discipline and business, so we picked several chapters from CRC Press titles that we thought would be of interest to you, the GameDev.net audience, in your journey to design, develop, and market your next game. The free ebook is available through CRC Press by clicking here. The Curated Books The Art of Game Design: A Book of Lenses, Second Edition, by Jesse Schell Presents 100+ sets of questions, or different lenses, for viewing a game’s design, encompassing diverse fields such as psychology, architecture, music, film, software engineering, theme park design, mathematics, anthropology, and more. Written by one of the world's top game designers, this book describes the deepest and most fundamental principles of game design, demonstrating how tactics used in board, card, and athletic games also work in video games. It provides practical instruction on creating world-class games that will be played again and again. View it here. A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing, by Joel Dreskin Marketing is an essential but too frequently overlooked or minimized component of the release plan for indie games. A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing provides you with the tools needed to build visibility and sell your indie games. With special focus on those developers with small budgets and limited staff and resources, this book is packed with tangible recommendations and techniques that you can put to use immediately. As a seasoned professional of the indie game arena, author Joel Dreskin gives you insight into practical, real-world experiences of marketing numerous successful games and also provides stories of the failures. View it here. An Architectural Approach to Level Design This is one of the first books to integrate architectural and spatial design theory with the field of level design. The book presents architectural techniques and theories for level designers to use in their own work. It connects architecture and level design in different ways that address the practical elements of how designers construct space and the experiential elements of how and why humans interact with this space. Throughout the text, readers learn skills for spatial layout, evoking emotion through gamespaces, and creating better levels through architectural theory. View it here. Learn more and download the ebook by clicking here. Did you know? GameDev.net and CRC Press also recently teamed up to bring GDNet+ Members up to a 20% discount on all CRC Press books. Learn more about this and other benefits here.
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Mobile App Development: The Struggle to keep it Simple

Unlike some of the Hollywood flicks these days, where the mindless comedies are dwindling away at their attempts at getting famous, a mobile application does as good as less the user would have to use their mind on it. Introducing a lot of complexities in a mobile application might not be the best course of action to get your more users.

Let’s take a look at some of the reasons, why you should work on keeping your application as simple as possible.

Complex Technology Could Pose a Problem

Making a mobile application is about creating an impeccable combination of technology and content that works beautifully. At least at the simplest level, a mobile application is just that. The perfect combination is what makes the business end of the deal possible. But when the balance in this combination gets disturbed, it creates problems. While technology makes the idea behind the application possible, it wouldn’t bode well with the end users if they have to deal with the complexity that comes with that technology. As a developer, you have to make your application simple enough for the users to not just understand, but really be interested in using the app. In order to make the app look less confusing, keep it simple.

Simplicity Gains you More Time

Or, you lose less time. Too many windows to open, too many tasks to get done - all in one app - it gets confusing, it seems like an eternity before the users see things actually getting done, and it looks messy too. And so, a clean interface always means an effective use of time and energy both, on the part of your end users. Simplicity is what brings efficiency to the whole experience of using any mobile application.
When You Need to Keep Multiple People on the Same Page

There are many applications out there which are usually used in groups of users - like the application Splitwise, which allows a group of friends to split money equally, telling each of them how much they owe every other friend, and how much everyone else owes them. These are classic examples of applications which need to be simple, because the chances of confusion here are abundant. The apps that are meant to bring about a level of organization into people’s lives - these are the kinds of apps that should never be complex. These are the apps that especially thrive on simplicity.

To say that mobile applications have changed the way people operate today in their day-to-day lives, would be just about right. That makes it even more necessary for the developers to work harder on making simplicity on of the top features of every application that they design. Because not just the understanding, but the accessibility and more than a certain amount of usage too comes from how simple and clear the structure of the applications is. The road to success, undoubtedly starts with simplicity.


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