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ThomasSauder

Quick Question!

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ThomasSauder    122
Hello, I''ve currently read Sams TeachYourself C++ in 21 days. And, unlike you guys, I think it did a good job! I understand Pointers, Arrays, Vector, Strings, Inheritance, Linked Lists (To some extent), Polymophism, Multiple Inheritance, etc.. Now I''m wondering, if that knowledge would be enough to read and understand the book OpenGL Game Programming. I''ve done some tutorials at NeHe and understood everything up to Texture Blending. (The ''glass'' tutorial.) I stopped to finish up the C++ book. Now I have a simple question. (I guess ) Would this knowledge be enough to read and understand that book? After I read that book, I''ll be heading onto Principles, Design, Math, and AI books, but I wanted to be able to have a base knowledge in opengl first. What are your inputs on this? And thanks! *I think i''ve overcome my horrendous<-sp? experience with Direct X That not only frightened me, but made me regurgitate everything i have learned in programming .... Sorry for the choice of words, just thought id type how i felt hehe. Thanks and Cheers!

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Zao Martyr    100
So far you sound like your off to a really good start. Im not familiar with the "OpenGL Game Programming" book, but I think having a pretty decent understanding of the win32 api will help you when learning Opengl regardless of what books you read.

Good luck!

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hplus0603    11347
Sounds good. I would recommend fully understanding 3D geometry and 4D linear algebra (vector/matrix math) before diving too deep into graphics, though. When you read things like "texture coordinate generation plane" for the parameters for glTexEnv(), you''re toast if you don''t :-)

Then once you know the language (C++) and the toolkit (OpenGL), what will you do with it? I find that a lot of people fall down on not understanding how the pieces can interact and come together to generate actual art on screen. You gotta know where you want to go, and then how to derive how to get there, before you can usefully apply the tools. Taking some sketching classes and knowing Photoshop pretty well, as well as a 3D modeler, is often useful for graphics programming, even if you''re not an artist at all.

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ThomasSauder    122
Ok. I understand 3D Algebra, for the most part. 4D? Never even herad of it. heh. But I''m pretty sure the book "OpenGL Game Programming has tutorials on all those subjects, from loading Models to making a world. I just want to know if I would be ready for that

Thanks

Cheers

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Chacha    138
OpenGL Game Programming is targetted at beginners, and so it sounds like you have enough programming knowledge to read through it. But in my opinion I would suggest you to take the time to learn C++ thoroughly before jumping into an API such as OpenGL, and know how to use the language properly and effectively, apart from just knowing the details of the language. These two books teach you exactly that:

Effective C++
More Effective C++

There is also Thinking in C++, which is available online for free, and the C++ FAQ Lite. All these books/faqs are excellent reads, they teach you how C++ SHOULD be used. I understand that it might be hard for you to spend more time learning plain C++ without graphics/APIs, but in the long run it will definitely help.

That is just my personal opinion, and if you want then go right ahead and read OpenGL Game Programming, but if you take the time to learn C++ *properly*, then you will be better off.

Just a suggestion.

[edited by - chacha on October 13, 2003 10:24:49 AM]

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superpig    1825
You might want to take a little break to consolidate your C++ knowledge - write some console-mode apps using the stuff you''ve learnt. It''d give the newly-assimilated knowledge some time to properly sink in before you begin the second onslaught (OpenGL).

Superpig
- saving pigs from untimely fates, and when he''s not doing that, runs The Binary Refinery.
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Guest Anonymous Poster   
Guest Anonymous Poster
Perhaps you should try and master 2D graphics before moving into 3D.

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oliii    2196
Take a break in the learning and make a 2D game (or basic 3D), like (wayhay!!!) a TeTris. No required artistic knowledge (), simple mechanics, and you can use your basic knowledge of OpenGL for that too. It won''t take you long, maybe 1-2 weeks for the gameplay basics, and 1 month/6 weeks for the polish (it''s what makes the difference between professional games and the other kind, so well worth doing). Making even a simple game will teach you a lot about programming games, or whatever you want to program (Drivers? databases? Accounting software? ).

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RaiLaN    122
quote:
Original post by ThomasSauder
No one has any inputs on how a noob would do reading OpenGL Game Programming?



Hi, i''ve been through about the first 15 nehe tutes, and a couple of other ones i found interesting.

I had a look at the book the other day, to me, it looked very basic, i found i knew the first half of the book allready.

I don''t think a ''noob'' would have any trouble understanding the book, it explained stuff very well, it was actually quite similar to the nehe tutes :/


my vote: get the book ;-)

-RaiLaN

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