• Announcements

    • khawk

      Download the Game Design and Indie Game Marketing Freebook   07/19/17

      GameDev.net and CRC Press have teamed up to bring a free ebook of content curated from top titles published by CRC Press. The freebook, Practices of Game Design & Indie Game Marketing, includes chapters from The Art of Game Design: A Book of Lenses, A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing, and An Architectural Approach to Level Design. The GameDev.net FreeBook is relevant to game designers, developers, and those interested in learning more about the challenges in game development. We know game development can be a tough discipline and business, so we picked several chapters from CRC Press titles that we thought would be of interest to you, the GameDev.net audience, in your journey to design, develop, and market your next game. The free ebook is available through CRC Press by clicking here. The Curated Books The Art of Game Design: A Book of Lenses, Second Edition, by Jesse Schell Presents 100+ sets of questions, or different lenses, for viewing a game’s design, encompassing diverse fields such as psychology, architecture, music, film, software engineering, theme park design, mathematics, anthropology, and more. Written by one of the world's top game designers, this book describes the deepest and most fundamental principles of game design, demonstrating how tactics used in board, card, and athletic games also work in video games. It provides practical instruction on creating world-class games that will be played again and again. View it here. A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing, by Joel Dreskin Marketing is an essential but too frequently overlooked or minimized component of the release plan for indie games. A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing provides you with the tools needed to build visibility and sell your indie games. With special focus on those developers with small budgets and limited staff and resources, this book is packed with tangible recommendations and techniques that you can put to use immediately. As a seasoned professional of the indie game arena, author Joel Dreskin gives you insight into practical, real-world experiences of marketing numerous successful games and also provides stories of the failures. View it here. An Architectural Approach to Level Design This is one of the first books to integrate architectural and spatial design theory with the field of level design. The book presents architectural techniques and theories for level designers to use in their own work. It connects architecture and level design in different ways that address the practical elements of how designers construct space and the experiential elements of how and why humans interact with this space. Throughout the text, readers learn skills for spatial layout, evoking emotion through gamespaces, and creating better levels through architectural theory. View it here. Learn more and download the ebook by clicking here. Did you know? GameDev.net and CRC Press also recently teamed up to bring GDNet+ Members up to a 20% discount on all CRC Press books. Learn more about this and other benefits here.
Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0
way2lazy2care

Resume Critique Please? : Updated February 1, 2010

9 posts in this topic

Hello all, I've been working on my resume for a while. Just wondering if I can get a critique. I'm especially concerned about my Skills section as I'm not sure what is relevant, what is given, and what else might need to be added/reworded. My portfolio link is in it as well, feel free to critique that, but for right now I'm looking for mostly Resume critique. http://www.micsworld.com/portfolio/resume Also, does anyone have any tips on spreading resumes around? Everyone always says customize the resume to the employer, but I'm wondering if it's necessary to do that if the positions I'm going for should require pretty much the same resume (I could understand it if I had a larger skillset). I do understand customizing the cover letter, so no need to preach to the choir on that. Update: Created another Resume without objective, but used the space to add Related Coursework, programming languages, and Relevant Tools sections. [Edited by - way2lazy2care on February 1, 2010 4:44:56 PM]
0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
This looks surprisingly identical to my resume in terms of format. I like that. Very legible.

Some thoughts:

* Drop the objective. It is a space waster, and your cover letter will make it clear what you are applying for.

* Drop any experience that is non-related to what you are trying to do. Jimmy Johns does not relate to game development.

* What is MAAS? What do they do? I have absolutely no idea what your role as a 'software engineer' was at General Dynamics after reading your bullet points.

* Expand your relevant experiences. For each bullet point, try bolding a phrase that really emphasizes what you want the bullet to say. For example, your bullets could be written as:

Ingenuity: Researched and documented potential development technologies for increased productivity in the team
Test Driven Development: Developed an automated Unit and Integration testing framework for the MAAS development team
Communication: Experienced intra and inter organization cooperation and communication in an international corporation

I would also do more to quantify each bullet point. By what metrics did you increase productivity? What development technologies did you research and document? To what benefit was the automated Unit and Integration testing framework? How exactly did the communication affect your everyday work? How many people did you communicate with? To what purpose?

This is your area to really shine -- I would make each bullet a few lines long and really work on getting measurable metrics down.

The goal should be to show TRANSFERABLE skills to wherever you are applying. If you aren't highlighting something transferable, take it out.

* Technical skills may be better replaced with 'relevant school work', or a section of project descriptions that allow the employer to get a better feel as to your actual level of comfort with the skills you enumerated. I glossed right over your portfolio link at the top -- and so would anyone else who printed the paper out. Use this area to enumerate the projects you have worked on in your portfolio and the skills required to complete them!



Other than that, I liked it! Good luck!
0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Quote:
Original post by choffstein
* Drop any experience that is non-related to what you are trying to do. Jimmy Johns does not relate to game development.

"Experience" is "work experience." ALL work experience must be listed regardless of "relevance."
0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Quote:
Original post by Tom Sloper
Quote:
Original post by choffstein
* Drop any experience that is non-related to what you are trying to do. Jimmy Johns does not relate to game development.

"Experience" is "work experience." ALL work experience must be listed regardless of "relevance."


Stating it like a fact does not make it true. He can put whatever he likes on his resume. I personally think that the space would be much better served enumerating the many things that he did do that are transferable to the new work environment. How on earth listing Jimmy Johns work experience would be at all relevant is beyond me. So why should he list it?
0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Noted previously stated things. Will update resume and repost an updated one later. And my other experience there is there because someone told me, specifically out of college, that employers want to make sure you are holding jobs whenever you aren't in school. Once I get a normal job they will no longer be there.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Quote:
Original post by Tom Sloper
Quote:
Original post by choffstein
* Drop any experience that is non-related to what you are trying to do. Jimmy Johns does not relate to game development.

"Experience" is "work experience." ALL work experience must be listed regardless of "relevance."


Really? Pretty much every hiring manager I've met recommends that you leave off non-relevant work experience, except maybe in circumstances where doing so would leave a pronounced gap in your employment history. Even then, if its not relevant, its probably only worth a one-liner just so you can say "Yes, I was actually employed." Its pretty common advice to leave off your fast-food job if you're applying for a programming position.
0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I have run into a problem.

I think I am going to replace most of my skills section with a related coursework section, but a lot of my classes have very long titles and i'm not sure how to go about adding them without taking up too much space. For example, "Math Foundation of Computer Graphics" is a pretty long title, and there are a couple more long ones. With titles like that, it makes it very difficult to fit more than a handful of classes on the resume.
0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Quote:
Original post by Tom Sloper
Quote:
Original post by choffstein
* Drop any experience that is non-related to what you are trying to do. Jimmy Johns does not relate to game development.

"Experience" is "work experience." ALL work experience must be listed regardless of "relevance."


I disagree as mentioned in this thread. I was advised by two people in our internship office at Northwestern to remove my summer job as a bag boy when I was 14. It's not relevant and just takes up space. Jimmy Johns probably has the same thing. Unless it was a long term job (more than a year) and you had several key responsibilities, it shouldn't be on there. If your only responsibility was "make food," then it's not something the company is going to care about.
0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I know that most of you guys are Americans, but the resume/CV depends heavily on where (geographically) you want to work. I think it applies to the USA too, since it's big, so maybe we should state where we are, and what is common there.

In some places, especially when you are a foreigner (and especially in this economical situation, and especially when the employer doesn't take care of the employee's tax/insurance/superannuation/whatever businesses, for example in Finland), every single workplace is worth mentioning, because it shows that you can organize your things, and the employer doesn't need to hold your hand, and you are ready to do not so pleasant/interesting/relevant jobs too.

And the "level" of your job (sorry, can't think of a better word) matters too, if no one mentioned yet.

In some countries CV means 20 pages, in some 1 page.

Edit: okay I see now, that most of these threads are Americans, but maybe it's interesting that I said anyway.
0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Quote:
Original post by szecs
snip.


I'm guessing you're from Finland then? I'm open to working out of the country, so I'll have to keep this in mind.

I've created a new version of my resume with Relevant Coursework, Programming Languages, and Relevant Tools sections.

I think I like the way the new one looks, but if you all wouldn't mind checking the new one (same link as original. Both are available) I'd appreciate it a lot! :)
0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!


Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.


Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0