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Soap360

STRAIGHT ASNWERS, What are the chances of making a successful indie game

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Go into law.



Frankly the fact you have to ask instead of just jumping in shows you are wrong for the field.



Then again, I have a number of lawyer friends and my god what a miserable profession that is too.

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If you can't spell answers correctly (or spend the effort to write a good question for something that should have such a dramatic impact on your life) I don't hold much hope for you in any profession.

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You can succeed in all kinds of fields but you have to be prepared to not have any (well as much as the 9-5ers anyway) fun anymore. It's a life choice.

Even gardening. I know someone that started mowing lawns and now has a nice landscaping business with employees. No spare time though!

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If you can't spell answers correctly (or spend the effort to write a good question for something that should have such a dramatic impact on your life) I don't hold much hope for you in any profession.


Aren't you the miserable fuck. I was rushing, I spelled it correctly in the description, so hats off to you.

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Straight answer? Odds are low you'll succeed, even lower that you'll get rich doing it, and the chances of becoming bankrupt while trying and losing a lot, if not all, are good - a solid business plan can help alleviate some of that, but no producer is omnipotent; things happen that are outside of our control all the time. Those are the hard truths. If you are comfortable with that, go for it. If not, don't try.
Either way, good luck! :)

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1. Straight shoot answers, if there's an indie development team, for example developing XNA for the Xbox 360, what are the chances they'll succeed and expand their team.
2. I have the choice to either go for Law and be well... a lawyer, or computer science, and go for something there, (obviously preferably game development).

1. You need to clarify the question.
- If you've managed to develop an XNA game, that's a measure of success right there.
- So what do you mean by "succeeding" exactly?
- And what's this linkage between succeeding and expanding the team? You mean growing a business? It's difficult to understand what you're thinking, since you haven't told us.
2. So you have to decide between game development and law? You should make a decision grid, and don't just include two options -- make a third: game law (in other words: "both"). Read here about how to make a decision grid. Read here and here and here (for starters) to learn about game law.

And let's watch the language.

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[quote name='Soap360' timestamp='1312749676' post='4845888']
1. Straight shoot answers, if there's an indie development team, for example developing XNA for the Xbox 360, what are the chances they'll succeed and expand their team.
2. I have the choice to either go for Law and be well... a lawyer, or computer science, and go for something there, (obviously preferably game development).

1. You need to clarify the question.
- If you've managed to develop an XNA game, that's a measure of success right there.
- So what do you mean by "succeeding" exactly?
- And what's this linkage between succeeding and expanding the team? You mean growing a business? It's difficult to understand what you're thinking, since you haven't told us.
2. So you have to decide between game development and law? You should make a decision grid, and don't just include two options -- make a third: game law (in other words: "both"). Read here about how to make a decision grid. Read here and here and here (for starters) to learn about game law.

And let's watch the language.
[/quote]

Nope. You're an indie team, 4-5 dudes. 2 programmers, sound engineer, designer, artist. You're focused on selling indie games on the xbox. No titles have been released. At this point you're just looking for recognition, not money. But what are the chances that you'll actually release a successful game and end up being recognized. Also, WHY are the chances so low?

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[quote name='Tom Sloper' timestamp='1312762183' post='4845968']
[quote name='Soap360' timestamp='1312749676' post='4845888']
1. Straight shoot answers, if there's an indie development team, for example developing XNA for the Xbox 360, what are the chances they'll succeed and expand their team.
2. I have the choice to either go for Law and be well... a lawyer, or computer science, and go for something there, (obviously preferably game development).

1. You need to clarify the question.
- If you've managed to develop an XNA game, that's a measure of success right there.
- So what do you mean by "succeeding" exactly?
- And what's this linkage between succeeding and expanding the team? You mean growing a business? It's difficult to understand what you're thinking, since you haven't told us.
2. So you have to decide between game development and law? You should make a decision grid, and don't just include two options -- make a third: game law (in other words: "both"). Read here about how to make a decision grid. Read here and here and here (for starters) to learn about game law.

And let's watch the language.
[/quote]

Nope. You're an indie team, 4-5 dudes. 2 programmers, sound engineer, designer, artist. You're focused on selling indie games on the xbox. No titles have been released. At this point you're just looking for recognition, not money. But what are the chances that you'll actually release a successful game and end up being recognized. Also, WHY are the chances so low?
[/quote]

Why is any market hard to get recognized in? Competition. Or, more importantly, the superior competition - bigger development teams, more money and more time. As an indie, you will usually have less of all three - making it fiercely competitive to get recognized in any capacity. Also, recognized by who? I assume you mean the gaming population at large, otherwise it varies wildly - impressing family and friends would probably take no more than completing the project.

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