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Scene Space

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guys can anyone explain to me what coordinate system is "Scene Space"?

Object Space (Local Space), Vertices - is the the object Vertex Data without any changes as it comes loaded
World Space - (Vertices * worldMatrix) - worldMatrix is a set of (translation, rotation and scaling) applied to each vertex
View Space - (Vertices * worldMatrix * cameraMatrix)
Clip Space - (Vertices * worldMatrix * cameraMatrix/viewMatrix * projectionMatrix) -> goes to rasterizer (done by GPU)

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As with many areas in game programming you will find terms are not always concrete and concepts share multiple names.
For example (shared names), Per-pixel lighting and Phong lighting.
View space and eye space.
Bitangent and binormal.

What is the difference between a framework and an engine?
What exactly does a “software engineer” do?


“Scene space” could have either of 2 meanings.
It most-often refers to world space. A game scene and a game world are generally interchangeable.
But if the engine is designed around the premise of a “scene” and it is encapsulated with a class and that class can be instantiated any number of times (multiple scenes running at once—this can be used for overlay effects and a number of other useful tasks), then it would refer to each scene’s space, assuming also that each scene could be considered basically a box with all of the models and objects inside it its children, and the box can be moved and oriented arbitrarily.

Hence it most-often refers to world space.


[EDIT]
Disclaimer due to the post below, which is entirely correct.
My words were a little misleading in that they imply that when multiple terms are used for the same thing, they actually are the same thing.
Sometimes that is the case, sometimes, not. I did not mean to imply that the terms I used above actually were the same things, just that they are very frequently used interchangeably, whether right or wrong.

To clarify one point more, “Phong lighting” is often wrongly synonymous with “Phong shading”, which is synonymous with per-pixel lighting.
[/EDIT]


L. Spiro

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I agree that terms are not always concrete or are shared. However, often they are used just misleadingly. E.g. "per-pixel lighting" targets the granularity of lighting computations, while "Phong lighting" means a model to compute the illumination itself. Of course you can do per-pixel lighting with another illumination model than Phong's. Also, a bi-tangent is a 2nd tangent on a surface, while a bi-normal is a 2nd normal on a line. Using bi-tangent with lines or bi-normals with surfaces is misleading.

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"Phong lighting" means a model to compute the illumination itself. Of course you can do per-pixel lighting with another illumination model than Phong's.


I think that was in reference to the attribute interpolation behavior, not the actual BRDF, but I can't necessarily speak for YogurtEmperor.

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Yup I have noticed that many concepts have many meanings any who, thanks for you input! nobody said it will be easy to learn ;) not to hard either just laborious

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