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HabitueGames

"Rougelike" Platformer

12 posts in this topic

[quote name='Stroppy Katamari' timestamp='1331816436' post='4922254']
Not even slightly a roguelike.
[/quote]
What would you call it then? I'm not sure what to categorize it as.
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My vote goes to Boar-Murder Simulator [img]http://public.gamedev.net//public/style_emoticons/default/biggrin.png[/img]

Seriously though -- it seems like you have some of the hallmarks of many rogue-likes: some amount of persistence, advancement, random generation. What you seem to be missing from the rogue-like formula is varying classes, (usually) in-depth stats, item management. Many rogue-likes are more about strategy than skills, which is hard to pull off in a platformer.

The closest thing to a rogue-like platformer that I can imagine would resemble a vast, procedurally-generated Castlevania, but with more item management, stats, and character classes with different traits.
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[quote name='Ravyne' timestamp='1331854655' post='4922426']
My vote goes to Boar-Murder Simulator [img]http://public.gamedev.net//public/style_emoticons/default/biggrin.png[/img]

Seriously though -- it seems like you have some of the hallmarks of many rogue-likes: some amount of persistence, advancement, random generation. What you seem to be missing from the rogue-like formula is varying classes, (usually) in-depth stats, item management. Many rogue-likes are more about strategy than skills, which is hard to pull off in a platformer.

The closest thing to a rogue-like platformer that I can imagine would resemble a vast, procedurally-generated Castlevania, but with more item management, stats, and character classes with different traits.
[/quote]

Ha, Yeah there will definitely be more monsters in the game don't worry about that! [img]http://public.gamedev.net//public/style_emoticons/default/smile.png[/img]
I have a "item system" that i'm implementing currently. Here is an overview of it , the player has 3 inventory slots
in those slots the player can hold special arrows, (fire arrows, ice, water, earth,..etc) And when you kill a boss you will get a random special arrow.
So if you have those 3 slots already filled with say.. Fire, Ice, and Water, you will have to toss one of them out to get this new arrow.
Hopefully that will add not necessarily more depth; but more strategy.
Thanks for the feed back!
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[quote name='Ravyne' timestamp='1331854655' post='4922426']
My vote goes to Boar-Murder Simulator [img]http://public.gamedev.net//public/style_emoticons/default/biggrin.png[/img]

Seriously though -- it seems like you have some of the hallmarks of many rogue-likes: some amount of persistence, advancement, random generation. What you seem to be missing from the rogue-like formula is varying classes, (usually) in-depth stats, item management. Many rogue-likes are more about strategy than skills, which is hard to pull off in a platformer.

The closest thing to a rogue-like platformer that I can imagine would resemble a vast, procedurally-generated Castlevania, but with more item management, stats, and character classes with different traits.
[/quote]

I don't think those traits are necessary. Spelunky is considered a Rougelike platformer, but it doesn't have classes or stats.

Actually Spelunky might be a good idea to look at.
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[quote name='Storyyeller' timestamp='1332041025' post='4922964']
[quote name='Ravyne' timestamp='1331854655' post='4922426']
My vote goes to Boar-Murder Simulator [img]http://public.gamedev.net//public/style_emoticons/default/biggrin.png[/img]

Seriously though -- it seems like you have some of the hallmarks of many rogue-likes: some amount of persistence, advancement, random generation. What you seem to be missing from the rogue-like formula is varying classes, (usually) in-depth stats, item management. Many rogue-likes are more about strategy than skills, which is hard to pull off in a platformer.

The closest thing to a rogue-like platformer that I can imagine would resemble a vast, procedurally-generated Castlevania, but with more item management, stats, and character classes with different traits.
[/quote]

I don't think those traits are necessary. Spelunky is considered a Rougelike platformer, but it doesn't have classes or stats.

Actually Spelunky might be a good idea to look at.
[/quote]

Will do thanks for input
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This is really kinda cool. I like the way that after you shoot the arrows, if they miss you find them sticking out of stuff lol. The boars jump extremely high for pigs. This could do with some music too. Although that's not such a big deal right now. The item management system and maybe a different weapons would spice it up nicely.
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I like the style and the concept!

One suggestion would be to make it so that you can see more of the screen at once. Given how little is visible in the video, it seems like it would be really difficult to react to, say, an enemy appearing from one side of the screen.
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It's a platformer, more generally an action game, therefore not a roguelike.

In roguelikes the randomness requires the player's strategy for survival to be deeper and more multifaceted because the player has to prepare ahead of time to deal with a lot of different things; without randomness you could beat the game with a step-by-step guide. In this game, a boar is a boar. There does not appear to be any strategic or aesthetic impact from having the boars come out in a slightly different order every time. Designing nice levels instead of auto-generating levels would allow for better difficulty balancing, rhythm, aesthetics. I don't really get why this game has generated levels.
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On the other hand if you were to somehow have the archer running through a side scrolling / platform version of the levels created in your dungeon generator (the facebook entry from Feb 16), then that would be significant strategically.

On kind of a different note, as the game appears in the video above, I'd really want to climb up into those trees.
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I should be coming out with a more updated version soon(next few days), keep in mind Archer Alec has only about 2 Days worth of work in it currently.
Thanks for all the feed back everyone!
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