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Thelias

Easy programming language

12 posts in this topic

OK folks, I need to know what progam is the easiest to learn but still powerful enough to brimg out a top notch game.
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Maybe you should define what you mean exactly with 'top notch', and what your previous experiences are in developing games, if any.

I can already tell you though that there's no such thing as a simple beginner-friendly program which allows you to make AAA quality games, and that it takes time, skill and dedication to build something decent.
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[quote name='Thelias' timestamp='1343043674' post='4962208']
OK folks, I need to know what progam is the easiest to learn but still powerful enough to brimg out a top notch game.
[/quote]

Also the intended platform makes a difference. Are you targeting iOS? Then you probably want to use ObjectiveC. Android? Then you'll want to learn Java. Windows PC? Your options are pretty much wide open but some popular choices would be C#, C++ or C. Edited by smr
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People I spoken to say "Python" is a good language to learn first.
If you ever played "EVE Online" it has been developed in "Stackless Python".
So why not take a look on Python and Stackless Python?

I can't say what platforms that uses Python. But if you are looking for PC.
Python might work.

But creating game is hard work in any language! Edited by FrozenSnake
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I think Python is really fun to start with, and PyGame is easy to learn.
The best about pygame.org is that you can download games that others have made, and take a look at there source code. Edited by Lars-Kristian
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You may want to investigate Alice.

[url="http://www.alice.org/"]http://www.alice.org/[/url]

[quote name='www.alice.org']
Alice is an innovative 3D [b]programming environment[/b] that makes it easy to create an animation for telling a story, playing an interactive game, or a video to share on the web. Alice is a freely available [b]teaching tool designed to be a student's first exposure to object-oriented programming[/b]. It allows students to [b]learn fundamental programming concepts[/b] in the context of creating animated movies and simple video games. In Alice, 3-D objects (e.g., people, animals, and vehicles) populate a virtual world and students create a program to animate the objects.

In Alice's interactive interface, students drag and drop graphic tiles to [b]create a program, where the instructions correspond to standard statements in a production oriented programming language, such as Java, C++, and C#[/b]. Alice allows students to immediately see how their animation programs run, enabling them to [b]easily understand the relationship between the programming statements and the behavior of objects[/b] in their animation. By manipulating the objects in their virtual world, [b]students gain experience with all the programming constructs[/b] typically taught in an introductory programming course.
[/quote]
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Please specify your programming background.

If you have never programmed before, Python could be a good start. Many US universities are teaching python to freshmans.
I began learning C on my college and I liked it. C is nicely structured and adapts pretty well to programming logic.

If you are going to use Python pay attention to the following: python2.x and python3.x are very different. They are both python but they use a different system for data structures and other stuff that don't blend very well.
Sticky to one of them and check the additional libraries website (i.e pygame, panda3D, etc.) to see what version they support for your platform.

If you want to use an engine, maybe C# is a good choice. It is accepted on Unity3D and Microsoft's XNA.
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You could make some top notch arcade games pretty easily using Game Maker. You can combine drag and drop development with its built in programming language(GML). It's very well documented and basically spoon feeds you programming if that's what your looking for.
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[quote name='FrozenSnake' timestamp='1343070627' post='4962331']
People I spoken to say "Python" is a good language to learn first.
If you ever played "EVE Online" it has been developed in "Stackless Python".
So why not take a look on Python and Stackless Python?

I can't say what platforms that uses Python. But if you are looking for PC.
Python might work.

But creating game is hard work in any language!
[/quote]

Python is a good place for a beginner to start programming, but I wouldn't go around suggesting Stackless Python. Stackless Python is just an alternative implementation to the more widely used CPython interpreter. It's a bit naïve to suggest Stackless Python just because _a_ game (Eve Online) uses it, especially without solid justification. Stackless is designed to solve a very specific set of problems--problems which 99.9% of Python programmers (newbies especially) don't need to worry about.

References:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Stackless_Python
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/CPython
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[b]I second that motion for Game Maker!![/b] Only if its going to be a 2D game. GML as a programming language is like a flexible, simplified, easy to learn version of C. Also now with the new version you can port it to a bunch of different devices. [url="http://yoyogames.com"]http://yoyogames.com[/url] if you decide to check it out.
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