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Sugavanas

PSP games in C++

13 posts in this topic

Ok, i think we don't need license to make a psp game and play it ourself, so is thre any books which says how to make a psp game in c++, and also after doing it how can i use the same game for pc

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If you really want to make a PSP game you could google PSP homebrew. It's not exactly legal though so I doubt there are any books about it. I don't really follow the homebrew scene, so I'm not sure how easy/possible it is to hack the current PSP firmware to allow you to boot programs (Sony keeps updating the firmware to prevent this, but it keeps getting hacked).

Is there a reason you really want to make games for closed platforms? Why not first focus on just making games (i.e. for PC) and then when you have a game (or more) finished you can worry about porting it to a console or portable device?

Porting from PC to PSP or vice versa mainly requires changing libraries you link to, which compilers to use, any OS specific calls, and maybe even platform specific rendering code, even endianness (depending on CPU architecture). That doesn't even account for menu issues (the PSP has different requirements than television based consoles or PC screens in terms of screen size and resolution), or optimizations (in terms of code AND assets).
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The legality depends on your location on the globe. Some countries it is acceptable, some it is forbidden, others it is a gray area. Know your own laws.

Unauthorized development for console and mobile devices is usually called "homebrew" development.

You can search the web for "PSP homebrew" and it will take you to some sites dedicated to it.

Note that homebrew development is generally much more difficult than simple PC development. You need to know how to program -- and how to do it well -- before you can be successful on homebrew development systems.
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Can I ask you a question?  Is there a specific reason you choose PSP over PS Vita?  Or maybe it's because you already have a PSP.  I also assume that you don't plan on selling anything you create for PSP.  If you do, you're better off targeting PS Vita.

 

Anyway, I agree with Frob here.  I started to touch PSP homebrew before, but didn't get too far into it.  

 

Keep in mind, that when programming for consoles (especially handhelds), you should familiarize yourself with the hardware as much as possible.  Unlike PC, Xbox1, as well as the upcoming 720 and the PS4, they generally don't have x86 processors.  You have to know how to optimize your code to utilize the hardware's chipsets, and let me tell you, it's nothing like dealing with PC!  Example, PSP has what's called a VPFU, which is a vector unit with a very specific instruction set.  Afaik, you can't program for that directly with C++; you have to use it's customized assembly language.  If you've never used assembly language for any specific processor, be warned, it's not easy.  And if you're going to use C++, I recommend keeping it simple.  Going OOP crazy isn't very optimal on such hardware.  I'd rather just use pure C.

 

Another thing you need to remember is that unlike PCs, developing for consoles (once again, especially handhelds), your memory and other system resources are VERY limited!  The PSP is a prime example.  The PSP only has 32Mb of system memory, and 2Mb of video memory.  That's not much, so your games have to be memory efficient; tight down to the very last byte!  So you'll find yourself optimizing your resources to fit within those memory constraints.   Don't expect things like texture and audio formats to be the same or even similar to PC either.  A few 32-bit textures will chew up that video memory in an instant.

 

I'm all for you pursuing this if it's what you really want, just don't expect it to be as simple as programming for PC.  There's a site I want to link you to, but I don't know if it's against the rules or not, so I won't risk getting into trouble.

 

Shogun.

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i am choosing psp becaz i already own 1, psp 3006, the latest one. Ok thanks guys i will search for it my self

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are handheld consoles more assembly orientated than object orientated?

 

Also I love Nintendo consoles ( Wii, gameboy, 3DS ) and PS2. Which of these is more accessible to program for?

Edited by hikarihe
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i am choosing psp becaz i already own 1, psp 3006, the latest one. Ok thanks guys i will search for it my self

 

Can you even run homebrew applications on the latest PSP ? (i know Sony has tried their best to block that ability with their firmware updates)

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ya i have downloaded others homebrew and run on mine, such as lamecraft, it could be done with the latest firmware

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are handheld consoles more assembly orientated than object orientated?

Also I love Nintendo consoles ( Wii, gameboy, 3DS ) and PS2. Which of these is more accessible to program for?

The question about "assembly oriented or object oriented" doesn't make any sense. An object is nothing more or less than a collection of data. Assembly is just a programming language.

There are programming languages that are a more natural fit to some devices, but you can use any language that compiles to the target architecture. Consider even a smaller device, the old Nintendo DS, that gave you a 66MHz processor -- many games ran at 30FPS, giving 2 million cycles per frame. You can do an awful lot of processing with two million cycles.


As for which is easier, usually the smaller platforms are easier to develop for simply because they are smaller. For the devices listed, there are several active GBA homebrew communities. The other platforms are going to be much more difficult to develop for just because of their relative size. PS2 and Wii are a pain to develop for even on the ligitimate devkits, and I don't think 3DS has a homebrew route yet.
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are handheld consoles more assembly orientated than object orientated?

Also I love Nintendo consoles ( Wii, gameboy, 3DS ) and PS2. Which of these is more accessible to program for?

The question about "assembly oriented or object oriented" doesn't make any sense. An object is nothing more or less than a collection of data. Assembly is just a programming language.

There are programming languages that are a more natural fit to some devices, but you can use any language that compiles to the target architecture. Consider even a smaller device, the old Nintendo DS, that gave you a 66MHz processor -- many games ran at 30FPS, giving 2 million cycles per frame. You can do an awful lot of processing with two million cycles.


As for which is easier, usually the smaller platforms are easier to develop for simply because they are smaller. For the devices listed, there are several active GBA homebrew communities. The other platforms are going to be much more difficult to develop for just because of their relative size. PS2 and Wii are a pain to develop for even on the ligitimate devkits, and I don't think 3DS has a homebrew route yet.

 

Thanks!

 

"but you can use any language that compiles to the target architecture"

Do the devices only accept their assembly language?

 

If not, how high level can you go for the popular devices?

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"but you can use any language that compiles to the target architecture"
Do the devices only accept their assembly language?
 
If not, how high level can you go for the popular devices?

 

You have to remember that an assembly language is not the absolute lowest level you can reach, even assembly needs to be assembled into the platform's machine language in order to create an executable.

 

And you can go as high level as you want for any platform, as long as there's a compiler available which compiles down your high level code into those machine instructions.

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"but you can use any language that compiles to the target architecture"
Do the devices only accept their assembly language?
 
If not, how high level can you go for the popular devices?

 

You have to remember that an assembly language is not the absolute lowest level you can reach, even assembly needs to be assembled into the platform's machine language in order to create an executable.

 

And you can go as high level as you want for any platform, as long as there's a compiler available which compiles down your high level code into those machine instructions.

 

I see.

  1. You find/create a compiler and use your favorite language (homebrew games)
  2. Or you use the console's official compiler provided by the company (qualified people only)
  3. The console only cares about the format of the machine instructions produced (executable file).

Is this correct?

 

If yes can you give me some examples of languages the console's official compiler can compile?

 

Thanks for all the info! Much appreciated!! ^^

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They're all different.

 

For example, the Wii had support from Nintendo for the console's own assembly language, for C and C++.  Third parties put together support for compiled C# through Mono, compiled Java, compiled python, and support for various other languages.

 

The hardware that console makers use is generally well known.  They use ARM chips, or PowerPC chips, or some other major chipset.  For any common chipset you can find open source tools that will compile targeting that hardware.

 

The first-party people like Nintendo, Sony, and Microsoft don't really care what languages you use to build your game.  They expect that major games will use many different languages.  

 

They care that you are targeting the latest version of the system, that you have included the last round of bug fixes, and otherwise meet their guidelines.  But as long as it compiles to a proper executable they really don't care the source language.

Edited by frob
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