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buttnakedhippie

Newbie here!: Looking for good Game Dev sites/book to start with

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I'm looking to start out with small games that I could maybe end up publishing to the Play Store/App Store. I would REALLY appreciate any suggested starting points with reading materials, different software to try, anything!

I took a short Computer Programming class my senior year of high school, but it didn't focus on much, and it was only one semester. We first covered a bit of HTML, then Kudo, Alice, and lastly, and very briefly, JavaScript.

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+1 to Unity - not only does it let you publish to iOS/Google Play, but also PC, OS X, Linux...you name it. 

 

Also, apart from C# and 'JavaScript' (it's really UnityScript), you can also use visual scripting tools like Playmaker to get around the code side of things and still make complete games.

Edited by gheeDough
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Well, to be fair, I was thinking that mobile games would be an easier start and also just a way for me to publish games when I'm finished with them. That's what drives me to want to make them. If this really isn't the case (it being slightly easier) then I might as well start out with what I'm working towards, which is getting into the industry of game development.

 

If I was planning on familiarizing myself with Unity3D, where would I learn about object scripts, models, textures, and shaders? Since I'm not very knowledgeable about it, should I stick with a basic program for now?

 

I don't have any languages that interest me specifically, because I haven't spent much time studying up on them. I've seen a lot about c++ being used and I always figured I'd start with that one, but I've recently heard that a language called Python is something people are using now.

 

So, C++ is programming, while C# (also how would you say that? :p) is for scripting?

 

Thanks!
 

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So, C++ is programming, while C# (also how would you say that? ) is for scripting?

 

It's pronounced "C Sharp" and it's a full blown programming language.

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Ugh. This is what I'm talking about! I'm still at the very beginning and I just wish there was some sort of linear path to follow. I want to start at the trunk of the tree but I have to pick one of the branches and I don't know which one is best for me.

 

Is there a book or some sort of resource that goes over the general basics first, or would that probably not even be the route to go? Should I dedicate to learning a language first?

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Is there a book or some sort of resource that goes over the general basics first, or would that probably not even be the route to go? Should I dedicate to learning a language first?

 

Choosing just one language at first is best.  Of the one's mentioned I'd probably recommend C# or Java as there's a lot of resources for learning programming that use these languages.  Python is another good language to start with.  Once you've mastered the basics of programming, it's easy to switch to another language if it suits your needs better.

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Of the one's mentioned I'd probably recommend C# or Java

 

Are these the languages you've learned, if so, how did you go about learning them? Or could you recommend any resources?

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Of the one's mentioned I'd probably recommend C# or Java

 

Are these the languages you've learned, if so, how did you go about learning them? Or could you recommend any resources?

 

 

I learnt C# from reading Microsoft's documentation.  I don't know Java that well.  I just picked up enough to put together a few Android apps.  I have been programming for around 30 years though, so it makes it pretty easy to learn a new language.

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I don't know Java that well.  I just picked up enough to put together a few Android apps.

 

 

What program do you use to put together your Droid apps?

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I don't know Java that well.  I just picked up enough to put together a few Android apps.

 

 

What program do you use to put together your Droid apps?

 

 

Eclipse.

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I don't know Java that well.  I just picked up enough to put together a few Android apps.

 

 

What program do you use to put together your Droid apps?

 

 

Eclipse.

 

You will also need the Android Development Kit.

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If I was planning on familiarizing myself with Unity3D, where would I learn about object scripts, models, textures, and shaders? Since I'm not very knowledgeable about it, should I stick with a basic program for now?

That is both the blessing and the curse of using a full engine like Unity.

 

 

It is wonderful because it provides all the features of a major game engine. You can have all the tools and technologies of a major studio.

 

It is also terrible because it provides all the features of a major game engine. You are probably just a programmer; you don't have modelers, animators, and technical artists like a major studio.

 

 

Both combined become the reason many hobby developers prefer smaller libraries where the programmer can code everything (including all the art) rather than a comprehensive engine that does so much for you. If you can provide basic art assets, simple models, and don't suffer too severely from "programmer art syndrome", engines like Unity can be very nice.

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How can a programmer 'code all the art'?

Circles, squares, and lines are built in to most graphics libraries. For 3D libraries there are similar cube, sphere, cone, and similar shapes that you can build.

Also, programmer art is fun. In Visual Studio just open up resource editor, draw some ugly bitmaps, and use them as resources built in to your app.
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Circles, squares, and lines are built in to most graphics libraries. For 3D libraries there are similar cube, sphere, cone, and similar shapes that you can build.

Also, programmer art is fun. In Visual Studio just open up resource editor, draw some ugly bitmaps, and use them as resources built in to your app.

 

 

Is this something that could utilize my Bamboo tablet that I practice my digital art on?

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Is this something that could utilize my Bamboo tablet that I practice my digital art on?

 

I'm not sure if Visual Studio's editor supports tablets. It could; but I doubt it'd pick up on pressure detection. For that, something like Krita, GIMP, PaintSai, or a program along those sorts may be what you want. If you're learning art, however, I'd vote to actually put the tablet aside, and start at the mouse / paint level, as that helps develop the fundamentals much better. Well, that's how I had learned some, anyway.

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Ugh. This is what I'm talking about! I'm still at the very beginning and I just wish there was some sort of linear path to follow. I want to start at the trunk of the tree but I have to pick one of the branches and I don't know which one is best for me.
 
Is there a book or some sort of resource that goes over the general basics first, or would that probably not even be the route to go? Should I dedicate to learning a language first?

Many people wish there was a linear path to follow.

I know one linear path I wish I could find: The simple, easy, lazy-man's way to become independently wealthy while living in a major first-world city.

Until then, most people forge their own path. They find concept and ideas that interest them for study. They find projects they want to work on. They find jobs at different places that each influence their lives in unique ways.

Finding something are passionate about takes time and effort. Sometimes you need to look at a lot of trees before finding the one you want to climb. But if you are careful and discover your passions, then follow those passions to wherever they lead, life can be pretty fun in spite of the bumps and bruises.
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Since you mentioned your class covered some HTML, and you want to make programs for the mobile marketplace, you might consider taking a look at HTML5. I was at the recent Apps-World conference and a recurring theme was people creating their games and apps in HTML5 so it can easily be used on any mobile platform - as long as the phone can run a web browser it can run your app. Sure it might not run as fast as apps written in the native language for each platform, and you might not be able to take advantage of platform-specific features, but I would be willing to bet that, as a beginner, HTML5 would suit your needs quite well for years.

 

As for books, I've been reading through the Head First C# book and I'm really liking it so far - there's one for HTML5 and Javascript you might check out.

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Since you mentioned your class covered some HTML, and you want to make programs for the mobile marketplace, you might consider taking a look at HTML5. I was at the recent Apps-World conference and a recurring theme was people creating their games and apps in HTML5 so it can easily be used on any mobile platform - as long as the phone can run a web browser it can run your app. Sure it might not run as fast as apps written in the native language for each platform, and you might not be able to take advantage of platform-specific features, but I would be willing to bet that, as a beginner, HTML5 would suit your needs quite well for years.

 

As for books, I've been reading through the Head First C# book and I'm really liking it so far - there's one for HTML5 and Javascript you might check out.

Thank you for your input. I actually went ahead and purchased a book covering C#, but I'm planning on trying to tackle a few languages by the end of the year.

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