• Announcements

    • khawk

      Download the Game Design and Indie Game Marketing Freebook   07/19/17

      GameDev.net and CRC Press have teamed up to bring a free ebook of content curated from top titles published by CRC Press. The freebook, Practices of Game Design & Indie Game Marketing, includes chapters from The Art of Game Design: A Book of Lenses, A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing, and An Architectural Approach to Level Design. The GameDev.net FreeBook is relevant to game designers, developers, and those interested in learning more about the challenges in game development. We know game development can be a tough discipline and business, so we picked several chapters from CRC Press titles that we thought would be of interest to you, the GameDev.net audience, in your journey to design, develop, and market your next game. The free ebook is available through CRC Press by clicking here. The Curated Books The Art of Game Design: A Book of Lenses, Second Edition, by Jesse Schell Presents 100+ sets of questions, or different lenses, for viewing a game’s design, encompassing diverse fields such as psychology, architecture, music, film, software engineering, theme park design, mathematics, anthropology, and more. Written by one of the world's top game designers, this book describes the deepest and most fundamental principles of game design, demonstrating how tactics used in board, card, and athletic games also work in video games. It provides practical instruction on creating world-class games that will be played again and again. View it here. A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing, by Joel Dreskin Marketing is an essential but too frequently overlooked or minimized component of the release plan for indie games. A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing provides you with the tools needed to build visibility and sell your indie games. With special focus on those developers with small budgets and limited staff and resources, this book is packed with tangible recommendations and techniques that you can put to use immediately. As a seasoned professional of the indie game arena, author Joel Dreskin gives you insight into practical, real-world experiences of marketing numerous successful games and also provides stories of the failures. View it here. An Architectural Approach to Level Design This is one of the first books to integrate architectural and spatial design theory with the field of level design. The book presents architectural techniques and theories for level designers to use in their own work. It connects architecture and level design in different ways that address the practical elements of how designers construct space and the experiential elements of how and why humans interact with this space. Throughout the text, readers learn skills for spatial layout, evoking emotion through gamespaces, and creating better levels through architectural theory. View it here. Learn more and download the ebook by clicking here. Did you know? GameDev.net and CRC Press also recently teamed up to bring GDNet+ Members up to a 20% discount on all CRC Press books. Learn more about this and other benefits here.
Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0
vanillastar

Free game engine that is really well documented and has good tutorials?

10 posts in this topic

I know quite a lot about web development. I made some games in Flash (Actionscript 3.0) and web applications in PhP (object oriented), javascript, Ajax etc…

 

I always wanted to learn to use a game engine, preferably free without limitations. One thing that really put me off is that it’s seems to be really hard to find one with up to date tutorials that take you by the hand and end up with a small game. Sometimes I even had a hard time to install/compile them in the first place.

 

The shift is really hard for me. Flash is like a closed system, I don’t have to compile it first, I can do many things without requiring extern libraries or tools. It has support for input, sound, and an eventhandler, scene manager, built in tools for animations… It’s really an “all in one” tool that allows you to make fast progress. And there are quite a few tutorials that start with the absolute basics and end with a complete, small game.

 

Many, even often suggested, game engines seem to be quite different. Or they are just a graphic library. I guess that’s the price for more complexity and performance, but It’s confusing and frustrating for me. Can you suggest me a versatile Engine that has an up-to-date documentation and/or tutorials that will cover more than how to use some features of that engine?

 

Note: I'm using Windows

1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Engine: Unity.
Help & Tutorials: Unity forum, Internet, Youtube etc.
Platform Support: Mobile, PC, Web etc.
Supported "D's": 2D, 3D & 2.5D.
OS Supported: Windows, apple os etc.
Language Support: C#, [Javascript, Boo (or is it Unityscript].
Ease of Use: Said to be high.
Cost of Use: Free for 2d. Free for 3d (without some features). Paid. too
:)
2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

If you love flash, maybe look at OpenFL?  

 

That said, most of the biggies, like Unity and Unreal have pretty decent tutorial support, and forums and StackOverflow-esque question/answer sites.  These big ones also have random people who post tutorials of their own.  I followed a tower defense tutorial to get me started on Unity.

 

Are you looking to move to 3d or stay 2d?  If the latter, you may want to look into something like GameMaker or Coco2d or one of the various HTML5 game engines.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Blender, it has a pretty decent game engine to work with. It's kept up to date, there are a lot of tutorials on the web for it, and it's quite to create game or even normal game for that matter in it. Hopefully I helped :).
0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

When I think of good documentation, I think of commented and explained code, with complete examples, detailing simple as well as asoric aspects of the enginein such a way so as to pick up and program. That being said, I'm not sure there is such a thing. Just a lot of game engines with  documentation ranging from decent to abysmal.  Some better examples are Unity, Panda3d, and Irrlicht.
 

Blender, it has a pretty decent game engine to work with. It's kept up to date, there are a lot of tutorials on the web for it, and it's quite to create game or even normal game for that matter in it. Hopefully I helped smile.png.

Yeah, have fun with that one.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Ogre is 3d rendering engine, but what about it? You can still use other libraries for sound, input etc. I think its only better for you as u are getting better using more tools. I am no pro in engines, and I also look for engine myself :)
0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I use Haaf's Game Engine (HGE) http://hge.relishgames.com/

Its a hardware accelerated 2d engine.

There are tutorials and docummentation on site as well as entire source code available on their website even tho the last version is from 2008 it is completely free even for commercial use (except the included BASS sound library, which is free only for noncommercial use)

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I just want to note that some of the listed game engines listed here are very small and/or dying.

 

Mixing multiple libraries together is probably not a good start for a beginner. I would advice a relatively complete library like SFML (you can look it up) or an actively used game engine like Unity.

 

But I think your question really depends on what you want. I myself started with GameMaker, which is a lot like Flash, but I liked more low-level things and the fun of coding with C++. But I can also imagine you could like having an engine to do all work for you, or use large libraries. These things, together with what language you would like to learn and/or know, are very important when making a decision about this.

 

I think you're overthinking it. If you see a nice engine with a good-looking tutorial for an engine, you should just try it out. As long as you have fun working with it, I would choose it, you can always learn more and other languages later. Just try starting here, nobody will argue that Unity is a bad game engine. If you don't like it, just try out some of the other engines listed here, or anywhere else! "Make games, not engines" (or something like that) seems to be a pretty popular article. I think an article called "use engines, don't discuss them" should also be written. smile.png

1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!


Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.


Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0