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      Download the Game Design and Indie Game Marketing Freebook   07/19/17

      GameDev.net and CRC Press have teamed up to bring a free ebook of content curated from top titles published by CRC Press. The freebook, Practices of Game Design & Indie Game Marketing, includes chapters from The Art of Game Design: A Book of Lenses, A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing, and An Architectural Approach to Level Design. The GameDev.net FreeBook is relevant to game designers, developers, and those interested in learning more about the challenges in game development. We know game development can be a tough discipline and business, so we picked several chapters from CRC Press titles that we thought would be of interest to you, the GameDev.net audience, in your journey to design, develop, and market your next game. The free ebook is available through CRC Press by clicking here. The Curated Books The Art of Game Design: A Book of Lenses, Second Edition, by Jesse Schell Presents 100+ sets of questions, or different lenses, for viewing a game’s design, encompassing diverse fields such as psychology, architecture, music, film, software engineering, theme park design, mathematics, anthropology, and more. Written by one of the world's top game designers, this book describes the deepest and most fundamental principles of game design, demonstrating how tactics used in board, card, and athletic games also work in video games. It provides practical instruction on creating world-class games that will be played again and again. View it here. A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing, by Joel Dreskin Marketing is an essential but too frequently overlooked or minimized component of the release plan for indie games. A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing provides you with the tools needed to build visibility and sell your indie games. With special focus on those developers with small budgets and limited staff and resources, this book is packed with tangible recommendations and techniques that you can put to use immediately. As a seasoned professional of the indie game arena, author Joel Dreskin gives you insight into practical, real-world experiences of marketing numerous successful games and also provides stories of the failures. View it here. An Architectural Approach to Level Design This is one of the first books to integrate architectural and spatial design theory with the field of level design. The book presents architectural techniques and theories for level designers to use in their own work. It connects architecture and level design in different ways that address the practical elements of how designers construct space and the experiential elements of how and why humans interact with this space. Throughout the text, readers learn skills for spatial layout, evoking emotion through gamespaces, and creating better levels through architectural theory. View it here. Learn more and download the ebook by clicking here. Did you know? GameDev.net and CRC Press also recently teamed up to bring GDNet+ Members up to a 20% discount on all CRC Press books. Learn more about this and other benefits here.
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Nicolas Evans

Desperate for help!

5 posts in this topic

Hi everyone!  Like many of you, I've loved games my whole life.  I'm new to the site, but have begun to read the forums for Game Development to try to begin understanding the ins and outs of the industry.  Currently I am going into my Sophomore year of college, majoring in Psychology.  I've enjoyed it and do well, but am very interested in going into Game Development.  I'm enrolled into an Intro to Computer Sciences course and plan to develop a background in programming (minor in computer science).  My dream is to work in a company contributing to game creation as a Behavioral/Cognitive Psychologist; helping to present and explain relevant statistics, cognitive patterns in societies, and behavioral tendencies of gamers.  While having a healthy knowledge in programming in order to understand key principals of game creation.  As a creative and imaginative individual I would love more than anything to work at creating games like Bioshock, which has been a gaming revelation to me and something I really appreciate.  I know I have the motivation to get there, but I need help getting started!!!

 

Unfortunately, I don't know a ton about computers, the gaming industry or generally where to begin.  I've formulated a small list though, of things I was hoping you all would help me with:

  • How the gaming industry works as far as getting up to date with the structural techniques individual companies are using and what companies like to see in their employees
  • How to expand my knowledge of computer functioning, acronyms, and programming
  • Where to seek out and learn about the steps and models of game creation
  • How to stay up to date with gaming in general and gaming culture
  • Where to begin connecting with people involved in Game Development (companies, individuals, etc...)

I have a fairly basic level of computer knowledge and gaming so if anyone has ANYTHING at all that could help me then I would really appreciate it.  I've looked into subscribing to magazines (Game Informer), working with Python, setting up meetings with Computer Science professors, browsing for gaming news, and checking out books relevant to the subject, but I don't know what the best sources might be.  

 

Again if anyone could help with these points or anything at all then that would be great!

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Hello Nicolas. 

I'm not a very experienced programmer myself, but i'm learning.

Unfortunately i haven't the answers to the most of your questions, but i can tell you one thing.

If dont don't already i can tell you there a a lot of programming languages around, so a good begin is to start

researching some of them to look which one you'll like the most. I read that you already started learning Python a bit.

I thinkt that's a really good start myself. I began a few weeks ago myself to and now i know some of the basics already.

This is the source i used: http://inventwithpython.com/chapters/ it's a free to read online book, where you will learn

the basics of Python, while making some small games. The most important thing to do is not to only read the theorie,

but you have to understand it to and maybe the most important is to practice a lot and maybe invent your own small games

with the things you learned.

 

I hope this helped you a bit further. 

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Hi Nicholas,

 

You've done research, which is good.  However, research can only get you so far, and before you make yourself a giant list of questions and start worrying about where to go from here, just get on with the 'here.'

 

By that I mean choose yourself a language (Python, Java, C# are good starting places) and a gaming library for that language.  It doesn't even matter which one, as eventually you're going to want to learn more than one anyway so where you start is irrelevant. 

 

Read the documentation on installing the language and library then look for some basic tutorials on how to write a simple game.  Once you get yourself a little hands on experience you'll be in a better place to decide if this truly is the career you want for yourself, and if so, you'll have gained some good knowledge that will help you decide what to do next.

 

Good luck to you.

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4. How to stay up to date with gaming in general and gaming culture
5. Where to begin connecting with people involved in Game Development (companies, individuals, etc...)

 

4. You mean from a player viewpoint (the point of view of a player)? Kotaku.com - Game Informer magazine - and you could just google "how to stay up to date with game culture" ("gaming" might turn up gambling sites). 

I'd recommend Gamasutra and GamesIndustry.biz for industry viewpoint updates.

5. Networking tips: http://sloperama.com/advice/lesson54.htm

 

These two questions, though, are not For Beginner topics - they are Game Industry Job Advice topics (and should be followed up on that forum, not here in For Beginners).

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I couldn't find a way to just change the topic without recreating the entire post, but I created the same post in Game Industry Job Advice.  Hopefully everyone will send advice my way on that forum!  

 

The advice everyone posted will help me ALOT.  I'm glad to be able to get the ball rolling a little faster.  Thanks for the help!

 

 


4. You mean from a player viewpoint (the point of view of a player)?

What I mean by staying up to date with gaming was aimed more towards company infrastructures, and methods of how different companies make their games.  However, The information you provided should be helpful as well so thank you!

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I couldn't find a way to just change the topic without recreating the entire post, but I created the same post in Game Industry Job Advice. Hopefully everyone will send advice my way on that forum!

 
You didn't need to change the topic here - and you shouldn't have simply re-posted everything in Job Advice. Just know that this forum is for technical questions, and the Job Advice forum is for questions about, you know, getting a job in the game industry.
Crossposting isn't welcome here. You can simply create new threads with new questions anytime an old thread seems to have gone astray. Just post questions in the forum best suited to the question.

What I mean by staying up to date with gaming was aimed more towards company infrastructures, and methods of how different companies make their games.


Gamasutra and GamesIndustry.biz, then. Edited by Tom Sloper
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