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Hello,

 

I'm Albert, a freelance composer for videogames.

I have attended some videogame exhibitions on Spain (country where I reside) and I plan to attend Gamescom this August.

Attending exhibitions it's something I believe is important, I'm planning to know which are all the exhibitions that I should attend in europe. My goal (important) is to actually meet the developers there, and have some conversation where I can offer my music services.

I'm looking for exhibitions where I can meet videogame studios with experience. If the studios they normally attend it are mainly indie studios, no problem.

If it's an exhibition focused on gamejams or universitary projects, please don't share it here.

 

 

Since I've said I'm a freelance composer for videogames, I want to end this post sharing my reel (https://vimeo.com/219898725) and some projects I've worked on:

- Missing Translation (http://store.steampowered.com/app/395520/Missing_Translation/)

 

- Dive Hard (https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.impressive.DiveHard)

 

Have a nice day,

Albert.

 

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I don't live in Europe and I haven't been to Gamescom. Gamescom is a trade show, which means that the companies presenting video games there are most interested in meeting retailers (are thus less interested in meeting developers; it's not the primary purpose for their being there). If you go up to someone at a booth and want to hand them a demo disc and resume, they'll probably be in marketing or sales. They'll likely say you should talk to someone else at the company (and at another time, not at the trade show). Or they may take your package and promise to give it to a producer or studio lead. Better to know in advance who you want to pitch your services to (by name), and even better to have a pre-made appointment to meet at the show. But shows are noisy, and nobody is going to be able to listen to your music right then and there. If you came up to me at a trade show with a disc and a resume, I'd take it and say thanks but I don't need a composer right now - and then if you're lucky, I'll have them in my office when I need to get a composer (I'm saying that sometimes the disc might not survive the trip home). 

In addition to trade shows, there are also conferences. At conferences, you're more likely to run into producers and studio leads rather than marketing or sales people. But again, you mustn't expect anyone to listen to your demo on the spot. 

Trade shows and conferences are worthwhile. Networking is important. You want to meet other composers. You want to meet producers and studio leads and design directors. Your best networking bet is to just get into pleasant conversations not focused on you. Make sure people have your card at least, and you want to get their cards so you can send them your demo and resume after the show or conference. "Hi, we met at Gamescom. I enjoyed hearing your thoughts on the Wonder Woman soundtrack..." 

To get dates of other European events, subscribe to Gamasutra and GamesIndustry.biz and Kotaku.

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12 hours ago, Tom Sloper said:

I don't live in Europe and I haven't been to Gamescom. Gamescom is a trade show, which means that the companies presenting video games there are most interested in meeting retailers (are thus less interested in meeting developers; it's not the primary purpose for their being there). If you go up to someone at a booth and want to hand them a demo disc and resume, they'll probably be in marketing or sales. They'll likely say you should talk to someone else at the company (and at another time, not at the trade show). Or they may take your package and promise to give it to a producer or studio lead. Better to know in advance who you want to pitch your services to (by name), and even better to have a pre-made appointment to meet at the show. But shows are noisy, and nobody is going to be able to listen to your music right then and there. If you came up to me at a trade show with a disc and a resume, I'd take it and say thanks but I don't need a composer right now - and then if you're lucky, I'll have them in my office when I need to get a composer (I'm saying that sometimes the disc might not survive the trip home). 

In addition to trade shows, there are also conferences. At conferences, you're more likely to run into producers and studio leads rather than marketing or sales people. But again, you mustn't expect anyone to listen to your demo on the spot. 

Trade shows and conferences are worthwhile. Networking is important. You want to meet other composers. You want to meet producers and studio leads and design directors. Your best networking bet is to just get into pleasant conversations not focused on you. Make sure people have your card at least, and you want to get their cards so you can send them your demo and resume after the show or conference. "Hi, we met at Gamescom. I enjoyed hearing your thoughts on the Wonder Woman soundtrack..." 

To get dates of other European events, subscribe to Gamasutra and GamesIndustry.biz and Kotaku.

Hi Tom, many thanks for your answer and time. I take note of a lot of things you've writed.

 

As you propose, I will consider to know in advance who am I going to pitch in the exhibition: knowing the name, and what they do. And also, I will look forward to pre-made appointments... shall I mail directly to a studio I know they will attend the event proposing a meeting? or directly use the networking tool on Gamescom?

 

Also, I'm thinking of going with business cards and also, pendrives with my reel, music and info about the projects I've participated. I spoke with a gamedev I worked before that told me that, if he meets a composer and he only hands his business card he probably won't listen his/her music (too many cards), but if he hands a pendrive, he most propably listen to it.

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Gamescom is a massive event, bringing a lot of game developers, of every level and skill set. Unless something drastic happens to change my plans, 2017 will be my 6th year in Cologne.

I have a few more pieces of advice for you that I've learned over the years:

1. Look into Respawn and Devcom, the conferences that proceed and accompany Gamescom on the developer's side (bonus tip: volunteers are still needed, save some money on registration and be part of a community of like minded individuals.)

2. Tickets to the business area of Gamescom cost more, and you'll have to show you are connected to the industry (which isn't hard) but it would bring you access to people you would never see at the consumer area, such as sound engineering middleware companies.

3. That said, developer teams can be found at the consumer area, manning the booths on the games they worked on, whether it's from a small studio like Amplitude, to a giant like Ubisoft, so don't be afraid to go around and ask if there's someone to give you critique.

4. Don't go look for devs on the last day, though. The dates have been moved this year, but I suspect this will still remain true, as the show draws to an end, people will start packing up and returning to their day jobs, with only the community managers left behind to man the fort.

5. Act like you belong. They may be ladies, but trying to get past the women who sit at the entrances of the booths can be intimidating. Sometimes waltzing in like you belong is all you need to meeting some amazing people. Sometimes they will kick you out irately, but it doesn't hurt to try. Sometimes just looking interested in a booth will be enough to be invited in, usually with the smaller studios. Never know where that might lead. At the least to some cool swag. ;)

Back to your original question, I think you GDC is still the one show you MUST attend, even if it is harder to get to, whether it's because of travel and living expenses to and at San Francisco, or because of visa issues (which as a Spaniard might not be as difficult for you as for others?)

GDC is massive, whereas the European conferences are smaller and split amongst the many countries with an established or emerging development community, and the ones in Asia are much more focused on the local market and without knowing the language, it will be much harder to communicate.

I think I prattled on long enough, but if I think of anything else, I'll write it down :)

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On 13/7/2017 at 5:48 PM, ItamarReiner said:

Gamescom is a massive event, bringing a lot of game developers, of every level and skill set. Unless something drastic happens to change my plans, 2017 will be my 6th year in Cologne.

I have a few more pieces of advice for you that I've learned over the years:

1. Look into Respawn and Devcom, the conferences that proceed and accompany Gamescom on the developer's side (bonus tip: volunteers are still needed, save some money on registration and be part of a community of like minded individuals.)

2. Tickets to the business area of Gamescom cost more, and you'll have to show you are connected to the industry (which isn't hard) but it would bring you access to people you would never see at the consumer area, such as sound engineering middleware companies.

3. That said, developer teams can be found at the consumer area, manning the booths on the games they worked on, whether it's from a small studio like Amplitude, to a giant like Ubisoft, so don't be afraid to go around and ask if there's someone to give you critique.

4. Don't go look for devs on the last day, though. The dates have been moved this year, but I suspect this will still remain true, as the show draws to an end, people will start packing up and returning to their day jobs, with only the community managers left behind to man the fort.

5. Act like you belong. They may be ladies, but trying to get past the women who sit at the entrances of the booths can be intimidating. Sometimes waltzing in like you belong is all you need to meeting some amazing people. Sometimes they will kick you out irately, but it doesn't hurt to try. Sometimes just looking interested in a booth will be enough to be invited in, usually with the smaller studios. Never know where that might lead. At the least to some cool swag. ;)

Back to your original question, I think you GDC is still the one show you MUST attend, even if it is harder to get to, whether it's because of travel and living expenses to and at San Francisco, or because of visa issues (which as a Spaniard might not be as difficult for you as for others?)

GDC is massive, whereas the European conferences are smaller and split amongst the many countries with an established or emerging development community, and the ones in Asia are much more focused on the local market and without knowing the language, it will be much harder to communicate.

I think I prattled on long enough, but if I think of anything else, I'll write it down :)

Thanks you very much for the tips!

I will try all of these ;)

I saw the devcom thing too late. I booked the fly and accomodation for Gamescom on January, and now it would be too expensive to change it. Well, no problem... I'll do gamescom + devcom next year.

I'm pretty excited but nervous about gamescom. I've been to Gamelab and Barcelona Games World (both events in Barcelona) but this was near my town, not in Germany, and they aren't big events like Gamescom. Let's see what happens :)

 

 

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