Brian.Washechek

I was hoping I wouldn't have to ride the Linux horse, but...

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I'm trying to follow this tutorial.

59d597718a10f_PSPLinux.png.cb4fc30755bb1b4c349305e32b6cdd39.png

I'm on step 2:

Download the PSP Tool Chain package (see Resources). Download this to "C:\cygwin\home\USER" (replace "USER" with your computer user name). Switch back to Cygwin and type "tar zxvf psptoolchain-20050625.tgz" and press "Enter." Type "cd psptoolchain" and press "Enter." Type "toolchain.sh" and press "Enter." When the error occurs type "svn update" and press "Enter."

I was fine until they started requesting my Linux usage. The problem is I'm not a Linux user. As you can see from my screenshot, I'm very out of my environment. I'm a Windows / DOS user. I've been that way my entire life. Could I get some help?

Edited by Brian.Washechek

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1 minute ago, Brian.Washechek said:

I was fine until they started requesting my Linux usage. The problem is I'm not a Linux user. As you can see from my screenshot, I'm very out of my environment. I'm a Windows / DOS user. I've been that way my entire life. Could I get some help?

As the error message says, the file you're trying to open cannot be found. This means you either mistyped the name of the file, or it doesn't exist at all, or it does exist but not at the path you specified.

Your working directory appears to be /cygdrive/c/cygwin/home/Brian, which means the file has to be in that folder since you specified just a file name and not a relative or absolute path name. Chances are it's not actually in that directly. Put it there.

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Pardon me for being rude, but you don't need to be a Linux expert to understand that a file with that name does not exist.

From the link you posted:

Quote

Step

Download the PSP Tool Chain package (see Resources). Download this to "C:\cygwin\home\USER" (replace "USER" with your computer user name).

Did you you download the psp tool chain? Did you place it in C:\cygwin\home\Brian ? And more importantly, is that file named exactly psptoolchain-20050625.tgz ? (Beware of case sensitiviness psptoolchain-20050625.tgz is not the same as PsPtoolchain-20050625.tgz)

You got the name wrong or didn't download the file into that folder.

 

Cheers

Edited by Matias Goldberg

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21 minutes ago, Brian.Washechek said:

So what command do I give Linux, then?

If you are this unfamiliar with basic command-line work, you are probably better off moving the file via Windows Explorer. "/cygdrive" is where Cygwin mounts your Windows filesystem, so "/cygdrive/c/foo/bar" is "C:\foo\bar"

In any event, the command you'd want is "mv" -- but that requires you to know both the source path and the destination path. We don't know where you put the file, so we can't help you.

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I will be frank. If you are diving into cross-compiling and you are not familiar with the basics of the environment, you will have a hard time.

Cross-compiling isn't an easy task for who is experienced, imagine if you are not familiar with the basics of the environment.

That tutorial seems waaaay to easy to be the the only thing that you need to do to compile for PSP.

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You probably don't care, but this isn't Linux. It's a small POSIX environment which is partially GNU-based. Linux is a kernel and uninvolved with POSIX layers like Cygwin and MSYS.

In any case, as others have said, you are following a bad guide. It isn't even coherent. You need to find something else. And frankly, if you're going to use a POSIX environment, it would be much easier to just use Ubuntu or something than to try to pass it through Cygwin.

That other thread you started included a link to the GitHub page of exactly what you would be looking for. This is the readme:

https://github.com/pspdev/pspsdk/blob/master/README

Seems simple to me. The readme is holding your hand all the way through the installation.

Though to be honest, I don't see the point in compiling for the PSP in the first place.

Edited by JulieMaru-chan

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Advice:

Download virtualbox

Install Ubuntu

Install shared folders. (basically means that you can access your linux stuff from windows)

That way you can manage your files from windows tools, while using pure linux to do the compilation

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1 hour ago, Brian.Washechek said:

I can't afford Visual Studio... Hopefully eclipse will do. Will it?

Any IDE you can configure to invoke a custom compiler will be fine; any VS edition should work, Eclipse probably could. 

You may be better off not bothering using the IDE (except maybe to edit your source files) at first. They won't magically integrate with the PSP toolchain, unless you find some kind of pre-configured template project. You're going to have to hook into the IDE's ability to invoke custom build toolchains to invoke the PSP compiler, linker, packaging tools, et cetera. That means you have to learn how to do that with whatever IDE you're using AND you have to learn how to correctly invoke the PSP compiler, linker, packaging tools, et cetera. 

You should probably learn how to do the latter on its own first. Then worry about wrapping an IDE around it.

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I guess my question are why are you so hell bent on programming a console ( portable or not ).  Getting the toolchain working is part of the battle and not a simple one. If you are not familiar with cross-compilation and the required setup as other have mentioned then you are going down a path that will lead to you getting frustrated and giving up before you even start. Once the toolchain is configured correctly, then you have to now worry about the hardware and all its idiosyncrasies. I would suggest start of with smaller task before diving into the deep end of the pool. Have you ever worked with the GCC toolchain ? If not, get familiar with it first. Have you ever done any cross-compilation ? If not start cross-compiling a few simple application and then testing them on the target system.

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You're correct about me. I am really about console programming. I can drop that if you would like.

 

What do you recommend I do first? I am new GCC toolchains. You were saying that I should look into the GCC toolchain first?

Edited by Brian.Washechek

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Your goal is as pointless as it is directionless. You do know that a video game console is still just a computer, right? In fact, they're usually far less powerful computers than regular PCs sold around the same time. I could understand if you just liked the PSP or NES or Atari 2600 or whatever and just thought it would be a cool exercise (kind of like that guy who made the Halo game for the Atari 2600). But you strike me as someone who isn't even experienced in video game development, nor are you focused on any particular system. You need to learn to crawl before you can walk (so to speak), and there should be an actual reason for supporting a certain system.

It's rather like a baby who hasn't even learned to crawl yet being hell-bent on using some kind of vehicle, without having a clue what vehicle they want to use, and so is just randomly trying out everything he can find, bikes, unicycles, tricycles, trucks, hoping to find something he can figure out how to use.

If your desire to develop video games ceases just because the video game is for a PC rather than a "console", I would suggest that perhaps game development is not for you. On the other hand, if it's actually your desire to develop video games and you still want to even if it's on a PC, start by developing something for PCs. Get experience there. After that, if you find it so fascinating, port something you made (or even a libre game someone else made) to the PSP or whatever. Whatever your interests are, you need to take it one step at a time.

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If all you want is to start developing games, and you are a beginner, I would recommend you download one of the following engines instead of worrying about setting up complex toolchains and getting homebrew SDKs from various places on the internet:

GameMaker is more geared towards 2D games. Unity and Unreal have templates for both 2D and 3D games.

hey are all free to download and test, so just pick one and try it. If you don't like it, try one of the other ones.

 

Look at some tutorials for the chosen engine, then try to make something very simple (e.g. Pong). Keep making increasingly complex games. Later on you might decide you want greater control, or just want the experience of doing this stuff without engines. At that point, you can look into other options (e.g. using libraries like SDL with C++, or similar). That's for future you to worry about, though.

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15 hours ago, Brian.Washechek said:

You're correct about me. I am really about console programming. I can drop that if you would like.

 

What do you recommend I do first? I am new GCC toolchains. You were saying that I should look into the GCC toolchain first?

My post wasn't mean to be a critique, nor a deterrent( was just pointing out a few salient issue ), nor can I tell you what to do I can only make suggestions. How can I be correct about you, when I don't even know who you are?  I would suggest get comfortable with the toolchain first before even thinking about the next step.

Edited by cgrant

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