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dimitri_gamer

No, not your usual console debate.

3 posts in this topic

As a mainstream/hardcore gamer who hopes to be in the industry in a few years, I was wondering, without giving too many reasons, who do you think will dominate, PS2, Dreamcast, Dolphin, X-Box etc... this time from a developers perspective, not from some try hards view. Is anyone working on any projects for any of the systems?
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Well, personally, I am really looking forward to the PSX2. The specs are just incredible and Sony has some nice new development tools over the PSX. If you''re interested in these tools, you can read about them over at playstation.com. Personally, I think this is an amazing system. The only thing that worries me here is the price.

I''m getting ready to start a port to the Dreamcast right now. Supposedly, you should be able to easily port a DirectX program to the Dreamcast, but it hasn''t been going real smooth. Since this is my first Dreamcast project, I can''t really say much about it yet.

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So your porting a PC game over. PS2 is so powerfull? I agree but why wouldn''t you be excited about Dolphin or X-Box. Although I must admit, it isn''t always a good idea to cross develop games for every console. Do you think Sony''s stranglehold is too strong? I personally (without sounding too much like a DC fan) think that Sega will make some money out of this considering they have given people like yourself the opportunity to easily port games over. I mean how can you resist, considering the little effort required and the potential profits. I think Sega knew that they would be outgunned by Sony, that''s why they made it hard to resist porting games over.

I''m sure a few of you who happen to be employed in the industry must know something about X-Box or Dolphin, obviously you wouldn''t be able to disclose much information admitedly.


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Well, where to begin? I guess I'll start with the Dolphin and X-Box. Believe it or not, I don't know near as much about these systems as you would expect. Developer's typically won't get anymore information than the general public until it's time or about time to start developing games for that system. At least, that's how it is where I work.

As far as the PSX2, It's only major flaw is going to be the price. It's going to put it out of reach for a lot of the younger gamers, but on the flip side, with support for things such as DVD, it will have more of an appeal for adults looking for a new electronic gizmo that they and their kids can use. (This does depend on the quality of the DVD output however).

I don't think that Sony has the stranglehold that it appears that they do. The fact is, Nintendo really shot theirselves in the foot with the cartridge base of the N64. This isn't to say that great games couldn't be made for the N64, but other than a handfull, they weren't. A lot of developers have stopped developing for the N64 for simple economical reasons. They were losing money. Still, the Dreamcast is starting to offer some real compitition to Sony. It just doesn't have enough games yet to dethrone the Playstation.

I do think Sega will make some money off the Dreamcast. It's a good system, but the problem with releasing a system as quick as Sega did the Dreamcast means that other companies can look at that system to see how to beat it. Nintendo did this back in the early 90s when it waited to release the SuperNES after the Genesis.

As far as porting goes to the Dreamcast, it's appearently not as easy as it sounds. Hell, we can't even get the code to compile yet for the Dreamcast. But it is just at the beginning of the project. If it turns out to be as easy as Sega would like us to believe, then I'll agree with you that it was a good move.

By the way, incase you are curious. Where I work, we develop for the PSX, N64, and Dreamcast. Soon, we'll also start developing for the PSX2.

Edited by - I-Shaolin on 1/24/00 4:56:29 AM
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