Jump to content
  • Advertisement

JohnMoberg

Member
  • Content Count

    5
  • Joined

  • Last visited

Community Reputation

102 Neutral

About JohnMoberg

  • Rank
    Newbie
  1. JohnMoberg

    Hosting and a new site

    You could just use CSS transitions.
  2. JohnMoberg

    rogue- and 2D-games

    Google "libtcod", it is a pretty full-featured library for developing roguelike games, and AFAIK can be used with C, C++, C#, python, D, and lisp, and also under Mac OS. Also, here is a long tutorial for using it with python, if you decide to go that route. [/quote] That tutorial seems great, however, I can't find any stable release of libtcod for Mac OS X.
  3. JohnMoberg

    rogue- and 2D-games

    The amateurish guide was great! Do you have any good tutorial for some curses-library? I'm on Mac OS X so it needs to work on there. It can be for C++, Python, Java or similar. Preferably C++ though. [/quote] No, I don't. The recent trend though is for these applications to be developed using pixel graphics instead of a genuine text-based interface. Instead of using pictures of people and map tiles, etc, text is drawn to the screen using either a text rendering function or just having an image containing all the letters of text, then drawing the letter from that image to the screen. This is a more flexible approach and enables you to substitute actual graphics at a later time with less effort. [/quote] I prefer actually doing the games in text. If I would make them using 2D-tiles, I could just create a normal game! A last question for you guys: will I as a beginner notice a big difference in performance between languages like C++, Python and Java? Of Python and Java - which would I have most use of in a future career within game development? Java as a language or Python as a scripting language?
  4. JohnMoberg

    rogue- and 2D-games

    The amateurish guide was great! Do you have any good tutorial for some curses-library? I'm on Mac OS X so it needs to work on there. It can be for C++, Python, Java or similar. Preferably C++ though.
  5. JohnMoberg

    rogue- and 2D-games

    Oh, sorry but I always assumed that rogue-likes would be simpler to do than most 2D-games. If it's so complex that you say, I will skip it and go straight for 2D games. I like Python as a language but pygame gives me an unserious impression, is it good enough to make commercial games in? Java is pretty good too - do you know of any tutorial that goes through the built-in 2D-library you talked about?
  6. JohnMoberg

    rogue- and 2D-games

    Hi! I've been programming for a few years now but mostly web development and only just started with "real" programming. So far I know the basics of Python, Java, C++, Ruby, C# and so on. However, I'm looking to get into games and I really, really can't seem to decide which language I want to use and stick with it. I know that C++ is the standard for commerical games today, but is it really needed for my needs? I'm just 15 years old and I've tried to get into OpenGL but lack the math knowledge required. Therefore, I'm just looking to make rogue-games in the terminal and then go on to 2D-games. What language would you suggest for that? I'd like it to work on Windows, Linux and OS X. Also, what graphics library should I use with that? In the case of rogue-games, how would I do that? I've made some simple games where you can walk around and so on but it's annoying to have to press enter all the time and not just WASD. So many questions, and I have so many more! Let's start with this.
  • Advertisement
×

Important Information

By using GameDev.net, you agree to our community Guidelines, Terms of Use, and Privacy Policy.

GameDev.net is your game development community. Create an account for your GameDev Portfolio and participate in the largest developer community in the games industry.

Sign me up!