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MoritzPGKatz

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  1. Hello, Great thing about your music is that it's always got its own kinda Calum-vibe to it. I agree with everything that's been said, nice tracks! Cheers, Moritz
  2. Hey, Hope everyone's doing well? I'm quite busy at the moment, but when I find the time, I like to play old standards on piano. It's kind of an oddly specific hobby, at least here in Germany - and I never really play live or make use of this style in my productions. That's probably why I'm not a very good player, but following the chords is good training for both theoretical and hearing skills. Plus, it's fun! Anyway, I thought I'd share some of it with you. https://soundcloud.com/mpgk/sets/piano-improvisations Nothing fancy sound-wise, I just put my Zoom H-2 recorder on top of an old piano. Any feedback welcome, of course! Any other jazz fans out there? Nate, I recall you play the sax, do you go to sessions from time to time or something? Cheers, Moritz
  3. Hello, Your second version is much better sound-wise! In my ears, it still lacks the "Oomph" you're aiming for, though - for a number of reasons, including sound choice, arrangement and overall suspense and dynamics. What usually helps me in those cases is doing an A-B comparison with a track that goes in a similar direction. Ask yourself these questions: - Are my synth and drum sounds up to par? - How did the other producer arrange the track to make it sound gripping and dynamic? - Am I doing too much at some point in the track? Are sounds competing for attention? Try not to apply compression and EQ willy-nilly, read up on some stuff and give it an almost engineering-like approach, at least for practice. For example, a lot of "Thump" and "Oomph" can be achieved by applying some good old side-chain compression. (Synths getting ducked by the kick) Try to use sound shaping tools in moderation, especially if you're not too sure what you're doing yet. If the EQs on all of your tracks look like roller coaster rides, you've probably made the wrong timbre and arrangement choices to begin with. By the way, how is your monitoring situation? Can you actually check the low frequencies reliably? If terms come up that you don't understand - like triplets and shuffle - Google those, try to apply them to something you're working on, and come back with more specific questions. In any case, thanks for sharing and being open to feedback! Cheers, Moritz
  4. Good going, Nate! Hope we can keep things fun and fair on this board! Cheers, Moritz
  5. Hey Ollie, As specialized as game audio may seem, I think people still have very varying focuses. No doubt there are people whose job it is to consider acoustic details, outlining a realistic audio environment, but that's probably more in the hands of audio programmers. Most people doing the creative work are using tools already fit for the job, especially nowadays: from algorithmic and impulse response reverb AUs/VSTs/RTASs over audio middleware like FMOD or Wwise to dedicated audio engines. And while I've studied that stuff for a few semesters ("systematic musicology" is what they call it over here), rare is the case where I have to pull out the old calculator to make things sound the way I want them to sound, and I'm very very glad about that. On the other hand, knowing some basic acoustics never hurt either, even if it's just to set up a proper monitoring environment or to get a good starting point when choosing and positioning microphones in the studio. But I can only speak for myself, really. Hope it helped though? Cheers, Moritz
  6. Hey Nate, Nice work, the style you chose really fits the art! As a really small point of critique, I think you went just a tiny bit over the top with the music in the rather whimsical/scary/chaotic part starting at about 0:42 and lasting until 01:15 - it feels out of balance with the sound design and altogether a bit "too much" to me. Might just be my personal taste, though! Good to know it's OK to share non-game music on here by the way, I'm producing music for a similar animated short soon, and I'd love to get some feedback on that as soon as it's ready. Anyway, thanks for sharing! Cheers, Moritz
  7. Hello Doni, Sorry for the rough welcome - I have to agree with Nate though, you're not really in a position to argue here. You had a chance to read up on the forum rules which are stickied at the top for everyone to see, and if you had checked out the rest of the forum like someone willing to contribute would have, you'd have seen a few threads that were locked up for that exact reason, right on the first page. And just as a side-note, that kind of attention is what I'd be looking for if I were looking for a new team member. Hope you're not too miffed! I like to think we're a friendly bunch over here, it's just that most forums get really cluttered with all the portfolio posts and other people pay good money to appear in the Classifieds section - so it's only fair to lock threads like yours instantly. Cheers, Moritz
  8. Hello, No idea... but FMOD's support is very friendly and competent, I'd ask over there. Cheers, Moritz
  9. ^ That's pretty nifty. I like the textures and shading, my personal favs are number 3 and 8. I'm not a fan of the new design changes either. The logo looks bland and the typography isn't in balance with the rest of the site. Michael, we've got many professional designers on this forum. Why don't you hire one of them if you want to give the website an overhaul? Or, if the budget's tight, at least start a competition for things like logos and stuff, winner gets lifetime GDNet+ membership or something. Cheers, Moritz
  10. Catchipstep! Had a blast listening to this, thanks for sharing Nate! Cheers, Moritz
  11. Same here! Agreed - never change a running system, they say... I try to only update when it's necessary or when I'm undertaking a major overhaul of my system anyway. Definitely never in the middle of a project! Best of luck Xiao'an, keep us posted if re-installing engine and iLok driver helped. Your music's really pleasant to listen to by the way, I like the bright sounds you used. The woodwind solo @ 1.00 is particularly uplifting. Cheers, Moritz
  12. ^ That shouldn't be the problem... too-slow HDD streaming should cause drop-outs, but no CPU overload. Plus, I can confirm streaming the samples from a fast 7200 RPM FW800 HDD like the G-Drive works! (my second HDD is a G-Drive) Cheers, Moritz
  13. It might help, not too sure about that, just wanted to check... I can definitely recommend switching to the Apogee anyway, the D/A conversion will be better, allowing a better monitoring sound. Not to mention the possibility of doing some nice recordings with the Duet's pre-amps, which sound lovely! My MBP has no native Firewire ports at all... the Thunderbolt -> FW800 works flawlessly though, even when daisy-chaining. I have it hooked up to a FW800 HDD which in turn is chained to my FW400 audio interface (Focusrite Saffire Pro 40). On that note, doesn't your G-Drive have a second FireWire port? You should be able to daisy-chain your Apogee interface then! Cheers, Moritz
  14. As a matter of fact, graphics can have a serious impact on performance, especially when you have a lot of floating windows with software and plug-ins not optimized for graphics performance. I quickly ran into this problem with my old MBP as it only had an integrated Intel HD GPU. On my new machine, I disabled the graphics switching feature that would switch to the weak on-board GPU when the MBP feels it doesn't need the powerful GPU and can save some power. I have the power adapter plugged in most of the time anyways, and graphics performance shouldn't become the achilles heel with the powerful CPUs we can use today. Seems like there's no graphics switching feature on iMacs, so that lead was wrong... if you're curious though, you can find out what card you're using by clicking Apple -> About this Mac -> More Info. Reinstalling the PLAY engine and iLok drivers might actually help - and it's easy to miss an update, EastWest's product support is very lacking and sometimes downright confusing. Double-check their downloads pages. Nevertheless, if that fails I'd write a mail to support. Might take them a few days to get back to you, be warned! Sure my friend, hope I can help - I know how frustrating it can be to be hindered by technical obstacles like this. Rest assured, with a CPU/RAM behemoth like that sitting on your desktop, Logic really shouldn't be complaining even with 50 instances of PLAY @ 256 samples. Does it make a difference performance-wise if you use the Apogee's Core Audio driver? Cheers, Moritz