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      Download the Game Design and Indie Game Marketing Freebook   07/19/17

      GameDev.net and CRC Press have teamed up to bring a free ebook of content curated from top titles published by CRC Press. The freebook, Practices of Game Design & Indie Game Marketing, includes chapters from The Art of Game Design: A Book of Lenses, A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing, and An Architectural Approach to Level Design. The GameDev.net FreeBook is relevant to game designers, developers, and those interested in learning more about the challenges in game development. We know game development can be a tough discipline and business, so we picked several chapters from CRC Press titles that we thought would be of interest to you, the GameDev.net audience, in your journey to design, develop, and market your next game. The free ebook is available through CRC Press by clicking here. The Curated Books The Art of Game Design: A Book of Lenses, Second Edition, by Jesse Schell Presents 100+ sets of questions, or different lenses, for viewing a game’s design, encompassing diverse fields such as psychology, architecture, music, film, software engineering, theme park design, mathematics, anthropology, and more. Written by one of the world's top game designers, this book describes the deepest and most fundamental principles of game design, demonstrating how tactics used in board, card, and athletic games also work in video games. It provides practical instruction on creating world-class games that will be played again and again. View it here. A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing, by Joel Dreskin Marketing is an essential but too frequently overlooked or minimized component of the release plan for indie games. A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing provides you with the tools needed to build visibility and sell your indie games. With special focus on those developers with small budgets and limited staff and resources, this book is packed with tangible recommendations and techniques that you can put to use immediately. As a seasoned professional of the indie game arena, author Joel Dreskin gives you insight into practical, real-world experiences of marketing numerous successful games and also provides stories of the failures. View it here. An Architectural Approach to Level Design This is one of the first books to integrate architectural and spatial design theory with the field of level design. The book presents architectural techniques and theories for level designers to use in their own work. It connects architecture and level design in different ways that address the practical elements of how designers construct space and the experiential elements of how and why humans interact with this space. Throughout the text, readers learn skills for spatial layout, evoking emotion through gamespaces, and creating better levels through architectural theory. View it here. Learn more and download the ebook by clicking here. Did you know? GameDev.net and CRC Press also recently teamed up to bring GDNet+ Members up to a 20% discount on all CRC Press books. Learn more about this and other benefits here.

Portella

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  1. You couldn't be more off-target on your conclusions, which probably means that your reasoning capacity isn't as good as you think it is. First of all, I'm not in university. I'm a self-taught guy, 41 years old, which wouldn't bother going through a book on AI just to fool myself, pretending I'm learning something, since it won't be in my résumé, considering I only do it for fun.   What about if I can't find a proof or if I'm not sure my implementation, even if finding a solution, isn't performing badly because of the way I have formalized my constraints, for instance? How can I measure if they work satisfactorily if I don't have anything against which to compare? And if I just plainly don't succeed in finding a solution after trying hard? Or if I'm just stupid? I have this right here, I suppose, or some would have gotten banned already.   Your post is just preposterous and arrogant. I was just asking for a piece of information and not for a presumtuous didactic judgement.
  2. I'm using "Artificial Intelligence: foundations of computational agents" as an introductory book on AI. I think that doing exercises and cross checking your answer with a correct one is a great way of learning, but I don't have access to a solutions manual. The authors refer to a solution manual which they make available to teachers using their book. Well, I'm not a teacher, but, nevertheless, I have tried to get in contact with them in order to ask for access to the solutions... no answer. I'm using the free version on the internet and I stated that I would pay for it, if necessary. Do someone know if the paid book comes with solutions for the problems presented? It is really frustrating to go through the exercises and not be able to check. Maybe I'm repeating the same conceptual errors again and again, without even getting aware of it.
  3. I really must thank everyone here for their points of view. It seems that I have given the impression of being overly concerned about my choice, to the point of staying frozen. I would only want to say that this isn't true. I keep going on with C#, but meanwhile, I want to keep getting informed in a subject that is still not clear enough. It's true that, as time passes, I'll probably approach the point Edd stated: In 3 years time, you may well know both Java and C# and you'll be one of the people saying "it doesn't really matter, your skills are largely transferrable between the two". Yet, I think it's the natural beginners anxiety, when exposed to a huge information flow from a competitive and fluid field of knowledge full of propaganda statements. I know that completely unbiased opinions are very difficult to get. Even here, we can have the impression of C# being a little favored, but the important thing is that I was able to get some very useful information by people who seem to have enough knowledge to make a good analysis and for that I thank you. Edd, I think that "tendencies" wasn't a good choice of word (it's more of a literal translation from portuguese); "trend", perhaps, would be better. Or, in the used context, "inclination of C# towards being cross-platform". I hope I'm expressing myself better now.
  4. I know that this question has come up hundreds of times on forums, but it is really disappointing how one can read through dozens of threads (hundreds of posts) without getting an informed, unbiased view. I'm a beginner programmer with very basic knowledge of C# and I see that thousands of others have the same doubt as me when trying to choose between those two languages. We receive answers like "language doesn't matter, learn algorithms, design principles, oop structure, etc", or "after learning java you'll jump to C# easily". It's not that I disagree with the above, but apart from learning the principles, structure, logic, etc, one need to get a repertoire of tools and, in fact, the language chosen may not matter that much, but the framework linked to it can take much time to be mastered. I have read through discussions about whole teams of experienced programmers resisting the change to another framework, indicating that this is a real concern among seasoned programmers. It's not just a question of adapting to syntax. Most discussions about both languages see the same repeated statements: - if you take on C#, you marry Windows. - No, you don't, you'll always have mono. (nothing is said about personal experience with mone though) - Java is "more" cross-platform. - C# is a better structured language. (this is the only point I see which seems to be uncontested in MOST debates, but again, it's not only about the languages, but about what its environment). - C# has better performance. (I don't know if that is true, but the possibility of using development tools like XNA and UNITY seems to have no parallel in Java. At least, from what I was able to find, JMonkey seems to be one of the best graphical engines around for use with Java, and graphics seem rather primitive) - Others just talk about very specific details, like GC efficiency, etc. Synthesizing, much of what is said seem like myths, uninformed points of view, fanboy talk or biased propaganda. I've even read a recent article which presumed itself very scientifically focused stating that C# has already had it best moment, but would soon fall into oblivion. To guide those that are beginning and that, differently from expert programmers, are concerned with what will continue to be available in 3 or 4 years from now, when they finally get productive, what do you consider to be the future of C# and Java? What is real about C# portability? What does Android java code translation, Mono, ISO standardization really mean in terms of tendencies? What about performance and graphics? Is there any engine like Unity for Java use? Will it ever be? What about future development? Some say that Java has been slower than C# in that aspect, others say that new languages based on the JVM make Java environment more worth learning. I would like to listen to informed point of views. Analysis by those that really know about what they are talking about, not fanboy talks and propaganda. This would be very useful, not only for me, but for thousands of others that are reading through the multiple forum threads which only bring further confusion.