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ericrrichards22

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  1. ericrrichards22

    Why is Eclipse the most popular Java IDE?

    Intelli-J is much better. There is a free community edition, and I believe that they also have student licenses if you sign up with a school email, so unless your coursework requires using Eclipse, you might as well make the switch. It's a much more pleasant experience. JetBrains does make some really excellent developer tools - for instance, Android Studio is now based on IntelliJ. Generally, what you learn in college is 5-10 years behind the curve, particularly with regards to tooling. At this point, I haven't seen Eclipse used professionally in some years.
  2. ericrrichards22

    FBX SDK : Object display wrong

    Usually I've seen this sort of thing when I forget to apply the transformation matrices for the parts of a mesh correctly. Looks like the body and head are two pieces, and the body mesh is missing a rotation, while the head is missing a translation. There's probably a root transform for each submesh that isn't being applied.
  3. I think I have a copy of that on the shelf, I'll see if the CD is still in it. It was probably five years ago when I went through it the last time, but I think it was compiling fine on VS 2010, maybe with some little tweaks.
  4. Last time, I had started working through Jamis Buck's Mazes for Programmers. I've made quite a lot of progress in the meantime, but haven't managed to keep up with posting about that progress. Today, we're going to work through the meat of Chapter 3, where we'll implement a simplified version of Dijkstra's Algorithm (really a breadth-first search), which we'll use to find paths through our mazes. We will also use this algorithm to help visualize the biases that exist in our two previous maze generation algorithms, by coloring the backgrounds of each cell according to its distance from a starting point. You can download the code for this post by downloading or cloning the Post_2 branch from my GitHub. Going forward, I'm going to try and tag the code for each post in a new branch - I'm still used to the old SVN model, but I'm trying to figure out how to take advantage of Git a little more. Below you can see an example of where we'll end up, drawing the longest path through a maze, and coloring each cell according to its distance along the path. Let's get started! Read more...
  5. ericrrichards22

    Mazes in C# - Part 1

    A few weeks back, I picked up a copy of James Buck's Mazes for Programmers: Code Your Own Twisty Little Passages. (The title is, of course, an homage to one of the original text adventure games, Colossal Cave Adventure, or Adventure for short, which featured a maze puzzle where every room was described as "You are in a maze of twisty little passages, all alike"). I read through most of it on my veranda in the mornings, looking out over Long Bay in Antigua while I was on vacation, wishing I had brought my laptop along with me (although my girlfriend is probably happy I did not...). Once I got back, I started diving into implementing some of the ideas from the book - it's been quite a joy, and a much needed break from debugging UCWA applications at the day job. The code in the book is implemented in Ruby, however, I'm not a Rubyist, so I decided that I'd work through the examples in my language of choice, C#. The code is pretty simple, so porting it over has been pretty straight-forward. I also figured it would be an interesting exercise for trying out some of the newer features in the more recent versions of C# - I've been stuck using C# 5.0 due to some tooling that we haven't had a chance to upgrade yet at work. Today, I'm going to mostly cover the examples from Chapter 2, which lays out the general plumbing of the framework that the rest of the book builds on, and implements two simple maze-building algorithms, the Binary Tree and Sidewinder algorithms. For the full code, you can check out my GitHub repository; things there may change slightly from the version presented here as I work through more of the book, but the general structure should remain similar. Video: http://richardssoftware.blob.core.windows.net/video/binaryTree.mp4 http://richardssoftware.blob.core.windows.net/video/sidewinder.mp4 Read more...
  6. ericrrichards22

    C++ IDEs - a rant

    I haven't used Visual Studio with C++ for a while now, but it really is excellent if you are working on .Net.  Except that 2015 has this awful memory leak issue where it uses three times as much memory that it never releases if you open HTML/JS files on multiple monitors.   I would have though Code:Blocks would have died by now, gone the way of Bloodshed Dev-C++.
  7. ericrrichards22

    Voronoi Diagrams

    A little over two years ago, I first saw Amit Patel's article on Polygonal Map Generation, and thought it was incredibly cool. The use of Voronoi regions created a very nice, slightly irregular look, compared to grid-based terrains. At the time, I had just finished up working on my DX11 random terrain code, and it looked like a fun project to try to tackle. I then proceeded to spend several months messing around with different implementations of
  8. Alright, ready for the third installment of this ray tracing series? This time, we'll get some actual rays, and start tracing them through a scene. Our scene is still going to be empty, but we're starting to get somewhere. Although the book I'm working from is titled Ray Tracing in One Weekend, it's starting to look like my project is going to be more like Ray Tracing in One Year... Once again, I'm going to put all of the relevant new code for this segment up here, but if you want to see the bits I've missed, check out my GitHub project. We will be circling back to the Vector3 structure I created last time, since I inevitably left out some useful operations... The core of what a ray tracer does is to trace rays from an origin, often called the eye, for obvious reasons, through each pixel in the image, and then out into our scene to whatever objects lie beyond. We don't have any objects to actually hit, yet, but we are going to lay the groundwork to start doing that next time. Below, you can see the setup of our eye, the image plane, and the rays that shoot from the eye through the image and into the scene beyond. Read more...
  9. ericrrichards22

    Ray Tracing #2: Abstractions

    It's going to take me considerably longer than one weekend to build out a ray tracer... Last time, I laid the groundwork to construct a PPM image and output a simple gradient image, like the one below. This time around, I'm going to focus on building some useful abstractions that will make work going forward easier. This is going to focus on two areas: A Vector3 class, which will be helpful for representing 3D points, directional vector, RGB colors and offsets. We'll implement some useful operators and geometric methods in addition. A Bitmap class, which will represent our output raster and handle the details of saving that raster out as a PPM image file. Ultimately, we'll be producing the same image as in the last installment, but with considerably less boilerplate code, and lay the groundwork for making our lives much easier going forward when we get to some more meaty topics. As always, the full code is available on GitHub, but I'll be presenting the full code for this example in this post. Read more...
  10. ericrrichards22

    Hello Raytracing

    Whew, it's been a while... A few weeks ago, I happened across a new book by Peter Shirley, Ray Tracing in One Weekend. Longer ago than I like to remember, I took a computer graphics course in college, and the bulk of our project work revolved around writing a simple ray tracer in Java. It was one of the few really code-heavy CS courses I took, and I really enjoyed it; from time to time I keep pulling down that old project and port it over to whatever new language I'm trying to learn. One of the primary textbooks for that course was Fundamentals of Computer Graphics, aka "the tiger book," of which Mr. Shirley was also an author. Since that's one of the more accessible graphics textbooks I've encountered, I figured this new offering was worth a look. It didn't disappoint. Ray Tracing in One Weekend is, true to its title, a quick read, but it packs a punch in its just under 50 pages. Even better, it's running at around $3 (or free if you have Kindle Unlimited). I paged through it in a couple of hours, then, as I often do, set about working through the code. If you want to follow along, I've put my code up on Github, although it's still a work in progress; we're wrapping up a new release at the day job and so I've not had a huge amount of time to work on anything extra. Fortunately, each example I'll be doing here is pretty self-contained, and so all of the code will be up here. We'll start at the beginning, with a simple Hello World a la raytracing. Read more...
  11. ericrrichards22

    Finite State Machines, Part 1

    One of my favorite books on AI programming for games is Matt Buckland's Programming Game AI By Example. Many AI programming books lean more towards presenting topics and theories, leaving the dirty work of implementing the techniques and algorithms up to the reader. This book takes a very different tack, with each chapter featuring one or more fully implemented examples illustrating the techniques covered. Even better, it comes in a format similar to a trade-paperback, rather than a coffee table book-sized tome, so it's relatively handy to carry around and read a bit at a time, as programming books go. It is also decidedly focused on the kinds of real-world, relatively simple techniques that one would actually use in the majority of games. And, mixed in the right combinations, these simple techniques can be very powerful, as the second half of the book displays, building an increasingly sophisticated top-down, 2D shooter game. What I particularly like about this book though, is that while it is presented as a book for programming game AI, it may be the best practical explanation of a number of fundamental AI techniques and patterns that I have seen. The lessons that I learned reading through this book have been just as applicable in my day-job as an enterprise developer as in my hobby work programming games, much more so than what I learned toiling through a semester-long AI course based on Artificial Intelligence: A Modern Approach... The first real chapter of Mr. Buckland's book (leaving aside the obligatory math primer chapter), is devoted to finite state machines. Finite State Machines are one of the simpler ways of organizing decision making, and are probably one of the most intuitive. I'll let Mr. Buckland's definition stand by itself: [quote] A finite state machine is a device, or a model of a device, which has a finite number of states it can be in at any given time and can operate on input to either make transitions from one state to another or to cause an output or action to take place. A finite state machine can only be in one state at any moment in time. Matt Buckland Programming Game AI By Example, p.44 [/quote] I've been working on porting the first example from Mr. Buckland's FSM chapter from C++ to C#, featuring a mildly alcoholic, spaghetti Western gold miner named Bob. I'm going to focus mostly on the FSM-specific code here, but you can get the full code from https://github.com/ericrrichards/ai/tree/master/trunk/WestWorld1. Read more...
  12. ericrrichards22

    Retro Mortis: RTS (Part 3) - Forged in Steel...

    Was quite enjoying this series, would also love to see Part 4
  13. For the past few weeks, I've been once again noodling on the idea of starting a .NET port of a classic Id FPS. As a kid on my first computer, an off-brand 486 with DOS, I just hit the tail end of the good old days of shareware. And amongst all the floppy disks of kiddy and educational software and sliming Gruzzles couldn't really hold a candle to exploring Indiana Jones and the Last Crusade-esque Gothic castles and knifing Nazis. While the original source-code for Wolfenstein 3D has been available for some time, it is a bit of a slog trying to wade through C code that was written 20 years ago, with near and far pointers, blitting directly to VGA memory, and hand-rolled assembly routines, let alone build the project successfully. Consequently, converting over to C# is a bit of a struggle, particularly for some of the low-level pointer manipulation and when loading in binary assets - it is very helpful to be able to step through both codebases side by side in the debugger to figure out any discrepancies. Because of these difficulties, I have started looking at the Chocolate Wolfenstein 3D project, by Fabien Sanglard. Mr. Sanglard is a great student of the Id Software engine source code, and has done several very nice writeups of the different engines open-sourced by Id. He was even planning on writing a book-length analysis of Wolfenstein 3D, which hopefully is still underway. Chocolate Wolfenstein 3D is a more modernized C++ conversion of the original Id code, with some of the more gnarly bits smoothed out, and using SDL for cross-platform window-management, graphics, input, and sound. Even better, it can be built and run using current versions of Visual Studio. The only problem I had with the Chocolate Wolfenstein 3D GitHub repository is that it is missing some dependencies and requires a small amount of tweaking in order to get it to build and run on Visual Studio 2013. These steps are not particularly difficult, but if you simply clone the repo and hit F5, it doesn't work right out of the box. If you are working on a Mac, there is a very nice guide on setting up the project in XCode, but I have not found a similar guide for Windows, so I decided to document the steps that I went through and share those here. Read more...
  14. ericrrichards22

    Doom3 is the proof that "keep it simple" works.

    This could really benefit from an editing pass to clean up the language, there are a number of places where it appears to be trying to say one thing, inferred from the context, but the actual words in the sentence say the opposite.
  15. ericrrichards22

    The Poor Man's Voxel Engine

    Great read, very impressive work. Reminds me of a project I started long ago and still hope to one day finish, a 2D medieval wargame.  The first iteration was in VB6 forms, with each tile of the world represented by two PictureBoxes - one for the terrain tile and one on top of the first to hold a unit.  It was insane, but I didn't know any better at the time :-)
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