Kavik Kang

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About Kavik Kang

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  1. This sounds great for programmers and artists, but there is no level of experience that matters for game designers. In fact, the more experience and knowledge you have the less likely you are to find a job making computer games. It is very easy to know too much about game design, since they re-invented the wheel just 35 years ago. If you know too much, your answers will be seen as "wrong" when, actually, they should re-write their questions based on the new information you just gave them. I think this is a great idea for programmers and artists, but its not going to be very helpful for designers.
  2. Lost Art Studios

    All of the songs of The Yes Album are a part of the Astral Invasion story;-)
  3. To make a computer game takes a lot of people, and all those people have to be paid. This means that, every day, a large amount of money is spent. There is great danger in saying "we will sell no wine before its time" when you spend $20,000 per day just on people's salaries. From the designer's point of view, for example, a game is never finished. It's not possible to finish a game. As our generation of game designers used to put it, "No game is ever finished, eventually someone wearing a suit rips it from your hands and puts it on the shelf". The Star Fleet Universe is probably the best example of this. It's been "in development" for about 40 years now. Steve Cole has spent his entire life on it. Thousands of people have contributed too it over 40 years. It's nowhere near being "finished", and it never will be "finished" in terms of all 8 octants of the galaxy being complete. It is the most "complete" and "most finished" game ever made, and yet is probably another 40 years or so away from being truly "finished". SVC and the rest of us won't live long enough to "complete" it. And this is why game companies, especially computer games where a large team of highly paid people is needed, create schedules and deadlines. If they don't, they will never be "finished" because that, by our experience... takes hundreds of people 80-100 years.
  4. It's just personal preference, of course, but I've always only liked games on console if they are best controlled with a gamepad. Any game that is better played with a mouse and keyboard, I like better on the PC. In my mind, console games are gamepad games and anything else is better on PC. Even then, because of it's the greater capabilities and wider range of options of a PC (even if it is a gamepad game, you still have the keyboard to work with for example), I generally think of all games as being potentially better on PC. Not that console games can't be great games, it's just that there is always more to work with on PC where even if a gamepad is the best control device, you still have a keyboard and mouse to work with as well.
  5. I was just answering his question, it was not a rant. I wasn't planning on continuing along those lines. As for creating an artificial universe... "Time is the fire in which we burn."
  6. You'd have to ask them why they have no interest in it. Not a single person has ever contacted me about it. It could just be because I am a "rock star game designer" and they don't allow us into the industry under any circumstances. They decided long ago that they didn't want to become like Hollywood, where you either have a big name actor or director or you don't get to make a big budget movie. They saw this same situation developing early in the history of their own industry with people like Sid Meier, Will Wright, and Jon Romero. They came up with the phrase "game designer as rock star" as "the worst person you can have in your office" as a means of saying "don't let the true professionals into the industry" without actually saying that. I was probably one of the inspirations for this phrase, and the poster child of exactly the types of people they didn't want to let in... because then who gets funded can be a random lottery instead of being a matter of who has the "rock stars". They don't want their business to work like Hollywood, and to do that they need to keep out anyone who might stand out among the crowd.
  7. Lost Art Studios

    I am looking for a programmer who is interested in making an indie game called Space Hockey. The design document can be downloaded from my blog on GameDev.Net. There are also over 600 pages of material relating too my 14-game Pirate Dawn Universe on this blog. For now I am only looking for a programmer who is capable of making Space Hockey, and together we can assemble the rest of the team from there. I am looking for someone who is at least near 30 years old and has finished at least one game before. I don't want to distract younger people from establishing themselves in a career with the lure of making games, and I want someone who has made at least one game before so that they understand going into it how much work that entails even for a simple game like Space Hockey. It doesn't have to be a game that was published, the whole point is just that you understand how much work it is to actually finish it. I am not looking to just make something to post on an indie site somewhere, the goal here is to eventually have Space Hockey for sale on Steam. As can be seen in the design document, once that has been achieved there is a lot of expansion of this that could take place resulting in half-a-dozen or so DLC expansions. This would begin as a hobby/indie project but will, hopefully, someday become a commercial game company. Assuming that Space Hockey and its DLC expansions were successful, the goal would be to transition into a commercial game company and begin work on the 14 games of my Pirate Dawn Universe. I have been designing games and simulations since before the computer game industry existed, for about 40 years now. I don't say this out of arrogance. It is simply a fact of time that today, in 2018, I am one of the most experienced and knowledgeable game and simulation designers in the world. Although the very simple Space Hockey does not use it, a physical construct that I call “Rube” is the fundamental basis of what you know as “The Matrix”. Rube is also the fundamental basis of cyberspace, an insubstantial holodeck, and a self-programming computer with omniscient communication. The later games of the Pirate Dawn Universe such as Territories, Mission, Clash of the Titans, and the Struggle of the Ancients games are all based on Rube. The Pirate Dawn Universe is a sci-fi universe focused on space ship games. Lost Art Studios games are based on the 300 years of game design that came before computer games. They are not, for the most part, based on past computer games. This is only one of the things that makes these games unlike any computer games that have ever existed before. As a former member of the SFB Staff, there is no competition out there for Lost Art Studios when it comes to making space ship games for the computer. If LAS can get off the ground, competing within this genre in the modern game industry would be like hunting rabbits with a 120mm cannon. This will begin as a hobby/indie project to create Space Hockey, and we can establish a typical deal where those who contribute to the creation of the game receive some form of payment if and when the game actually makes money. I really don't care about the money very much and am open to anything that works. The true goal, however, is to get Lost Art Studios off the ground as a commercial game company that will very easily dominate the space ship game genre with its 40 years of accumulated knowledge of the Star Fleet Universe community. And, of course, Rube... which also partly comes from the SFU. Even if Lost Art Studios manages to get off the ground, we would not attempt to develop a truly large or complex game at first. Part of the plan within the design of the games of the PDU is that the first three games are smaller and more simple games to make. Territories is a prequel, that “Civilization scale war game” is first chronologically but can be made at any point during the telling of the PDU story. The actual first three games are intentionally simple to make. As an MMO Pirate Dawn is “massive” from the player's perspective, but it it is actually a fairly small and simple game too make. The “massiveness” of Pirate Dawn is an illusion too the player. The game itself isn't actually “massive”, the simple arcade game maps are. Manifest Destiny and The Trade Wars, what would be the second and third games, are both smaller and easier to produce than Pirate Dawn is. They are both intentionally minimalist strategy economic war game “scenario generators” where the focus is heavily on the tactical combat resolution (which is not 3D). Lost Art Studios would not even attempt to make a “big game” until we were on our fourth release. If you are interested in helping to create Space Hockey, with a plan already place to keep going from there, you can contact me through my blog on GameDev.Net or my e-mail address: From Astral Invasion...
  8. I am looking for a programmer who is interested in making an indie game called Space Hockey. The design document can be downloaded from my blog on GameDev.Net. There are also over 600 pages of material relating too my 14-game Pirate Dawn Universe on this blog. https://www.gamedev.net/blogs/?page=1&filter=my_blogs&sortby=blog_last_edate For now I am only looking for a programmer who is capable of making Space Hockey, and together we can assemble the rest of the team from there. I am looking for someone who is at least near 30 years old and has finished at least one game before. I don't want to distract younger people from establishing themselves in a career with the lure of making games, and I want someone who has made at least one game before so that they understand going into it how much work that entails even for a simple game like Space Hockey. It doesn't have to be a game that was published, the whole point is just that you understand how much work it is to actually finish it. I am not looking to just make something to post on an indie site somewhere, the goal here is to eventually have Space Hockey for sale on Steam. As can be seen in the design document, once that has been achieved there is a lot of expansion of this that could take place resulting in half-a-dozen or so DLC expansions. This would begin as a hobby/indie project but will, hopefully, someday become a commercial game company. Assuming that Space Hockey and its DLC expansions were successful, the goal would be to transition into a commercial game company and begin work on the 14 games of my Pirate Dawn Universe. I have been designing games and simulations since before the computer game industry existed, for about 40 years now. I don't say this out of arrogance. It is simply a fact of time that today, in 2018, I am one of the most experienced and knowledgeable game and simulation designers in the world. Although the very simple Space Hockey does not use it, a physical construct that I call “Rube” is the fundamental basis of what you know as “The Matrix”. Rube is also the fundamental basis of cyberspace, an insubstantial holodeck, and a self-programming computer with omniscient communication. The later games of the Pirate Dawn Universe such as Territories, Mission, Clash of the Titans, and the Struggle of the Ancients games are all based on Rube. The Pirate Dawn Universe is a sci-fi universe focused on space ship games. Lost Art Studios games are based on the 300 years of game design that came before computer games. They are not, for the most part, based on past computer games. This is only one of the things that makes these games unlike any computer games that have ever existed before. As a former member of the SFB Staff, there is no competition out there for Lost Art Studios when it comes to making space ship games for the computer. If LAS can get off the ground, competing within this genre in the modern game industry would be like hunting rabbits with a 120mm cannon. This will begin as a hobby/indie project to create Space Hockey, and we can establish a typical deal where those who contribute to the creation of the game receive some form of payment if and when the game actually makes money. I really don't care about the money very much and am open to anything that works. The true goal, however, is to get Lost Art Studios off the ground as a commercial game company that will very easily dominate the space ship game genre with its 40 years of accumulated knowledge of the Star Fleet Universe community. And, of course, Rube... which also partly comes from the SFU. Even if Lost Art Studios manages to get off the ground, we would not attempt to develop a truly large or complex game at first. Part of the plan within the design of the games of the PDU is that the first three games are smaller and more simple games to make. Territories is a prequel, that “Civilization scale war game” is first chronologically but can be made at any point during the telling of the PDU story. The actual first three games are intentionally simple to make. As an MMO Pirate Dawn is “massive” from the player's perspective, but it it is actually a fairly small and simple game too make. The “massiveness” of Pirate Dawn is an illusion too the player. The game itself isn't actually “massive”, the simple arcade game maps are. Manifest Destiny and The Trade Wars, what would be the second and third games, are both smaller and easier to produce than Pirate Dawn is. They are both intentionally minimalist strategy economic war game “scenario generators” where the focus is heavily on the tactical combat resolution (which is not 3D). Lost Art Studios would not even attempt to make a “big game” until we were on our fourth release. If you are interested in helping to create Space Hockey, with a plan already place to keep going from there, you can contact me through my blog on GameDev.Net or my e-mail address: kavik_kang@hotmail.com.
  9. I've been trying to make games like that for you for many years, Levi. Nobody cares and nobody is interested. I wouldn't hold your breath, nobody wants an "artificial universe". You can't give one away...
  10. Why A.I is impossible

    Right now, a "human like" AI... I agree. But 1 million years is a very, very long time. A million years from now our technology will appear too be "magic" to us "primitive apes" of the 21st century.
  11. Why A.I is impossible

    I didn't say that the universe was a living entity, either. I said that it could be. And now I'll add that is every bit as likely to be the case as the conventional way of interpreting the universe. Of course, I also have a functioning model of an artificial universe and it looks a lot more like a living entity than a frozen sea of rock. Rube says that if the universe is a living entity then time is the cardio-vascular system of the universe. But Rube doesn't prove that the universe is alive, either, it just actually functions which makes what Rube has to say interesting too me. The point is that we know so little of what the universe is and how it functions that either point of view is equally likely. And the fact that gravity appears to be "magic" too us is a strong indication that we don't understand a lot of very "simple" and basic aspects of what the universe is and how it functions. The "sci-fi" I am actually getting this from is my own PDU lore where this is the basis of both the science and religion of my universe. Your cell phone began as Star Trek's communicator. My uncle worked on lasers and particle beams for the US military. Or how about Alcubierre's Warp Drive... https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Alcubierre_drive Just because an idea originates in sci-fi does not mean it isn't correct, or potentially possible within the real world. I'm not saying that Rube is correct and the universe is a living entity, only that it could be. "And the stars look down..." ;-)
  12. Execution: Backstory revelation

    This reminds me of a Kevin Kostner movie called "No Way Out" about a Russian Spy named Yuri. You might watch that movie for some inspiration/ideas. I haven't seen it in many years, but it has aspects too it that are similar to your story.
  13. How many dimensions of progression can a game have?

    Table top designers called this concept "future". A single scenario "has no future", while a chain of scenarios forming a campaign "has a future". This has a big impact on the psychology of the player. When a game has no future then the player seeks to expend all of their resources over the course of that one game/scenario. When there is a future the players will conserve for the future. So, for example, if a player has 12 missiles to fire and no means of reloading them between scenarios then they will be hesitant to use missiles. In a scenario with no future, they've got 12 missiles to use in that fight. Of course, having a future can be used in many interesting ways at a strategic level. It also often goes a long way in creating balance. A very long way. Some games can be very hard to balance for the very reason that they "have no future". This is one of those subjects that can be discussed endlessly, and I have only barely scratched the surface of the difference between a game that has a future and one that does not.
  14. Why A.I is impossible

    No, there aren't. Gravity is probably the greatest mystery of what little we know of how the universe functions. What gravity is, and what the source of gravity is, is a complete mystery to science. About all that is known of gravity is that it exists, its strength, and that it is always associated with mass. What gravity is, and specifically what the source of gravity is, are not known. Gravity appears to be "magic", we can conceive of no mechanism by which mass would create gravity and there is no reason that it should. And this is a part of the discussion, I didn't introduce it out of nowhere. I was replying to someone who was dismissing the idea of a "soul" because they believed that it was related to religion, when it really isn't. If the universe is a living entity, and we are just components of it, than it would make scientific sense that there is a shared conscientiousness between all life. Gravity could be related too this. We really know very little about how the universe functions. So little, that almost anything is possible.
  15. Why A.I is impossible

    If you look into it you will find that science has no idea where gravity comes from. All things with mass have gravity, but science has no idea what the source of gravity is. You might assume that mass is the source of the gravity, but science does not know that this is the case. The actual source of gravity, and what it actually is, is a complete mystery to science. You have gravity. A rock has gravity. A bottle of wine has gravity. All things with mass have gravity, but that does not necessarily mean that mass is the source of gravity and science can think of no mechanism that would cause mass to "magically create" gravity. "A quantum leap forward in time and space, the universe learned to expand. The mess and the magic, triumphant and tragic, a mechanized world out of hand. Computerized clinic for superior cynics, who dance to a synthetic band. In their own image their world is fashioned, no wonder they don't understand." - Professor Pratt