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QueenSvetlana

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About QueenSvetlana

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  1. QueenSvetlana

    Video Game Movies

    Tomb Raider has been rebooted and being released soon, and it might bring in some money, especially given Wonder Women, other movies (Ocean's 8) and TV shows that have strong female characters getting more prominence. Just because it bring in money, doesn't mean it's a good movie or a good adaption of a video game. I enjoyed the first Resident Evil movie, Silent Hill, Red Faction, and Doom, but they weren't faithful adaptations of the games. It was mindless fun for a few hours. Depending on where you read or who you listen to, a variety of reasons exist for why we haven't see a good video game movie. Example: The writers and directors don't understand the source material. They don't take it seriously, so studios place inexperienced directors to handle the film. They try to add elements or references from the game that end up failing (Doom's first person shot). Questions: Why do you think we haven't see a good video game movie? Do you think we'll see a good video game movie within the next 10 years? (Remember, there was a time when comic books didn't translate well to the big screen, now it's a completely different story).
  2. QueenSvetlana

    Wizards and Warrors

    @Satharis I think your answer summed it up pretty well. So my next question is, you have to have some level of trust in the developer who is writing subclasses of Weapon to include a private enum and a method to access the enum and verify it. I guess afterward you would test it to ensure that a Sword does in fact have a WeaponType.Sword declared privately or look at the code :D.
  3. QueenSvetlana

    Math in C# and Python

    @TheComet: Thanks for the links, I was writing my module for the simple pleasure of doing it. That made me wonder why it didn't exist out of the box.
  4. I was writing a Python module to calculate the area of basic shapes. I was surprised to learn that Python's math library, out of the box, doesn't have that functionality. I looked at the C# math library, and again no methods to support calculating the area of shapes. Why? I didn't take me that long to write, and I'm sure the C# and Python developers can probably come up with more efficient solutions. A look at the Python math libraries show functions for factorials, power, logarithmic, and trigonometric functions.
  5. Batman has his no kill rule, and depending on the movie or TV show you watch, two reasons exists Justice not Vengeance or not to lower himself to criminals that he stops. Batman does however beat a lot of people up. It's never shown what happens to the people he beats up, they're either knocked out or run away. What happens if a person dies because of injuries sustained from Batman beating somebody up? Does this violate his no kill rule?
  6. I came across this blog by Eric Lippert, in it he describes a common problem: A wizard is a kind of player. A warrior is a kind of player. A staff is a kind of weapon. A sword is a kind of weapon. A player has a weapon. With the following conditions: A warrior can only use a sword. A wizard can only use a staff. To solve the problem he suggests the implementation of a Rule class that enforces the above rules. Quote: I attempted to try this, but I ran into a problem. public final class GameRules { public static boolean verifyifwizardcancarry(Weapon weapon){ boolean canCarry = false if weapon is a a staff set canCarry to true return canCarry; } } public abstract class Player{ private List<Weapon> weapons; // constructor and OOP goodness left out public abstract void add(Weapon weapon); } public final class Wizard extends Player{ @Override public void add(Weapon weapon){ if(GameRules.verifyifwizardcancarry(weapon){ // - code to add weapon to inventory } } } How can I verify that the Weapon being passed to the GameRules class is in fact a Sword? From reading, the use of instanceof or getClass() is considered code smell. You could trust the developer of the Sword class to declare a parameter that states it's a Sword, for example, an enum, WeaponType.Sword, and Sword could implement a method called verify and you pass that enum in and it returns true if it's a sword, false if it isn't or call a getter that returns the enum value. Using what is stated in the blog, how would you solve this in a reliable way?
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