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Raab314159

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About Raab314159

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  1. Hi, Is there a function in Managed DirectX that automatically extracts all the frames in an animated gif to an array of Textures? I mean something like this: Texture[] textures = TheUnknownFunction("AnimatedGif.GIF");
  2. Problem rendering point sprite

    Thanks, I simply forgot to light the point sprite. This thread can be closed.
  3. Hi, The following code only displays a black square as a point sprite, without the texture. Any idea why the texture is not displayed? *********************************************************** device.BeginScene(); device.SetTexture(0, TextureLoader.FromFile(device,"bullet.jpg")); device.Material = material; device.VertexFormat = VertexFormats.Position | VertexFormats.PointSize | VertexFormats.Diffuse; device.DrawUserPrimitives(PrimitiveType.PointList, 1, crosshairs); device.EndScene();
  4. Extremely Simple question

    Quote:Original post by Dmytry does not matter. As about why, because i started writing with a+b>c ,he started writing with a-b<c , note the order abc. edit: and, OP, don't feel too bad that you haven't solved. I remembered that in the school there i studied, most of the class was unable to prove other very simple teorem... so proving this may be as well be too hard for homework :). You're just a gifted person, Dmytry ;)
  5. Extremely Simple question

    Quote:Original post by Dmytry 2 sides of triangle ABC is always longer or equal(in degenerate cases) than third side.That's because third side is a line and line is a shortest path between 2 points,so any other path is longer. Let's sides lengths is A,B,C. A+B>=C subtract B from both sides A>=C-B Proven. i'd guess, too simple to be homework. Indeed, too simple to be homework tnx
  6. Extremely Simple question

    Do you know why the difference of two sides of a triangle is always smaller than the third side? I have been trying to prove that a - b < c for a few hours :( Tnx in advance
  7. Just use "0" instead of "NULL". (Dennis Ritchie : The C++ programming language )
  8. Don't care?

    Quote:Original post by petewood It's quite likely you're a Type 5 personality which means you like to know stuff for yourself, and you have a Type 6 wing which means you find it hard to trust other people's authority. Take the test and read this thread Personality and Programming. BTW, you can test your sex appeal right here.
  9. x86 asm questions

    Just read the book "Assembly Language Step-By-Step" by Jeff Duntemann. He can teach idiots like me.
  10. Don't care?

    Actually, I'm a person suffering from [a kind of vegetable] syndrome...
  11. Don't care?

    I agree that you must be insane to learn things you'll never use *directly*. However, I find that if you know everything there is to know, programming becomes a lot more interesting, like in the good old days of real mode assembly programming when it was quite easy to know everything....
  12. Don't care?

    Are you such a person that wants to know everything going on under the hood? For example, I'm trying to figure out what happens when a WIN API function gets called from your program. Calling a DOS service via INT 21h is pretty simple. But after looking days for info about calling WIN services, I only found out that when such a procedure is called, a DLL is loaded in memory and Windows updates the calls in your program to any windows service with the actual adresses in memory. Do you know this process in more detail, for example the purpose of Import Libraries? Ps: Is it really necessary to know all the inner workings about Windows, COM, Protected Mode, GDI etc to become a proficient programmer? You really have to learn for years in order to know all this stuff :(
  13. Math Cosmetics!

    Thanks for all your input! To summarize: We label points from left to right, just because we read from left to right.Then: (y2-y1)/(x2-x1) Is better than (y1-y2)/(x1-x2) because in the first case the the denoninator is *always* positive (only if we put P1 to the left and P2 to the right)
  14. Math Cosmetics!

    Quote:Original post by Neosmyle But while I'm here, I guess the reasoning behind the (y2-y1)/(x2-x1) is that if the line has a positive slope, you will be left with a positive numerator and denominator. (EDIT: and if the line has a negative slope, either numerator or denominator will be negative. So P2-P1 lets you work with negatives less. Everyone hates negatives hahaha =) Thank you, that's pretty clear. From what you are saying here I can also deduce the points (x1,y2) and (x2,y2) are put on the line from left to right by default :) [Edited by - Raab314159 on August 3, 2004 4:25:05 PM]
  15. Math Cosmetics!

    Quote:Original post by Muzzafarath And what do you do if the line happens to be vertical? ;) Hehehehhe
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