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Maquiavel

If OpenGL is open-source, where is its source?

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I've "googled" a lot of terms and have never found OpenGL source code for download. But why everywhere we see that "OpenGL is a open-source API (...)"? Thanks Alfred

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I think it is an open standard and not open source. That means that anyone can modify it, which is why you see extensions from diffrent video card manafactuars. Where did you get your info?

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OpenGL is not an Open Standard or Open Source. It is strictly controlled by a standards body (the ARB). However, the extensions mechanism is there to allow for additions to the standard which can later be incorporated into later releases.

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Oh.. I think I was travelling. Or because of the "Open" in the name. And a classmate that is Linux programmer said it too.

Good to know this. Now I stop searching it source-code.

Thanks guys.
Cya!

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If you want an open-source implementation of the OpenGL standard, check out Mesa3D. The 'guts' of OpenGL are typically implemented either in Mesa or by the video card manufacturer as part of driver installation.

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What I really want to see is how a API works itself. Not a implementation of a existent one. Per example (a very impossible to happen one!): the source code of DX and see how its created, how everything works.

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FWIW, SGI *does* have source code for a reference rasterizer for OpenGL. However, forget about getting your hands on it for free.

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Quote:
Original post by Maquiavel
What I really want to see is how a API works itself. Not a implementation of a existent one. Per example (a very impossible to happen one!): the source code of DX and see how its created, how everything works.


That's what Mesa3D is. If you don't have drivers for your vid card, but want to build and execute OpenGL applications, you can build and install Mesa and link against it. It provides a software-only (ie, no hardware acceleration) implementation of OpenGL. You can browse the source code and see how it works.

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Does that mean that linux distribution which use Mesa3D will not be hardware accelerated? How do you get hardware support on a linux game then? I ask because when i query SDL+OpenGL it says that i do not have hardware support, but i'm still getting a good framerate.

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Quote:
Original post by VertexNormal
That's what Mesa3D is. If you don't have drivers for your vid card, but want to build and execute OpenGL applications, you can build and install Mesa and link against it. It provides a software-only (ie, no hardware acceleration) implementation of OpenGL. You can browse the source code and see how it works.


Ah, good. I'm going to see it.

Quote:
Original post by Sneftel
FWIW, SGI *does* have source code for a reference rasterizer for OpenGL. However, forget about getting your hands on it for free.

This is the problem, *pay* for the code.



Thanks again.
All the best.

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