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tjweb92

C++ and Binary

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Hi, I am only 13 but have been programin AI for two years mainly with QB. I am starting C++ but i can't find a C++ compiler that doesn't require me to reboot into DOS to run it. And i am also learning Binary I know letters and numbers to make a data file but how do i use binary as a programing language. If you can help i will add your name to my next program release in the credits. Thanks

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Cannot be April Fool's, since it was posted 31/3.

Why not try the free Visual Studio Express from Microsoft ? Although I had to reboot to OS to use it, but perhaps after some time it won't bother you too much.

Binary programming language ... sounds like orc mischief to me. Perhaps you could be a bit more spesific about the problem ? Ones and zeros are a bit complicated for programming.

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What about BloodShed Dev-c++? It is pretty good, and I have never had to use DOS or even the windows command line to get it to run. I find it better than the Microsoft Visual Studio products. Or maybe it is just 'cause I hate windows ;).

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Here's some links to the compilers that were mentioned:

Microsoft Visual C++ Express
Bloodshed DevC++ (Don't let the name scare you [wink])


As for using binary as a programming language... that's pretty complicated. Your computer basically speaks what is called machine language, which is represented with binary. You can technically write programs in machine language, but it's very difficult. Different types of computers will use different machine languages. PCs use what is called the IA32 architecture, which was originally developed by Intel. Macs used to use the PowerPC architecture, but have recently switched to using Intel as well. Machine language is "close to the hardware" since you are basically telling the computer every single step and instruction. Machine language written for one architecture will not work on computers that use a different architecture.

If you want to explore that more, I'd recommend assembly language. An assembly language is basically the same as a machine language, but it lets you type out nice words and such instead of having to do everything directly in binary. It is still close to the hardware, but is a lot easier to work with. A fair number of people write code directly in assembly language when they need to, but writing in machine language is never really done - it's just too complex and hard to keep track of.

Programming "close to the hardware" is hard. You have to know an awful lot about how the computer works in order to do anything interesting, and it is very easy to make risky mistakes. Usually it is much easier to get used to programming in a high level language first, and then work your way down towards assembly language.

QBasic is an example of a high-level language: it lets you write programs without having to know very many details about how the computer will run your program. Most popular high-level languages have tools (compilers) for generating machine code for you automatically, so you can get machine-code programs without having to write the machine code yourself. Almost all programs are done in high-level languages because they help prevent mistakes, and help you catch mistakes when they happen. Assembly language is pretty cool and can be lots of fun, but it can also be very frustrating if you're not already very familiar with computer internals.

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Quote:
Original post by Demus79
Cannot be April Fool's, since it was posted 31/3.

Why not try the free Visual Studio Express from Microsoft ? Although I had to reboot to OS to use it, but perhaps after some time it won't bother you too much.

Binary programming language ... sounds like orc mischief to me. Perhaps you could be a bit more spesific about the problem ? Ones and zeros are a bit complicated for programming.


Different time zone is a possibility

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Quote:
Original post by Tradone
Different time zone is a possibility


No insult to the OP, but I hope so.

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