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chiqo

Learning I've no skill yet still overthinking!

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I've read Object Oriented Prograamming C++ 4th Edition. Did some exercises, honestly I'd say I covered 70% of this book. Mark some topics for reread later. then I'm thinking go with The C++ Programming Language [4th Edition] - Bjarne Stroustrup any suggestion will precied. 

I don't have any programming experience. But I've play a lot of games... Here goes nothing... 

I'm thinking make a game. (Looked up with unity engine seems like brain surgery to me. )At the beginning my game will have only one big-ass map. 4 type of NPC's 
Get quests from NPC's, get your reward after finish. 
Buy metarials (equipment, healt potions etc)
TeleportGate NPC's 
Monsters 

The goal is finish quests, get stronger, learn skills, collect seven unique diamonds among the quests and face with evil creature. 

 

This is already very complex for me, but I couldnt help myself to think deeper and deeper.Then I thought why not MMORPG... then things get messy. I am keep overthinking, I cant concentrated now. 

These are what I am thinking on the server side; 

there will be 4 units. 

NPC's with static locations (Stroge, Trade, Quests, Gates etc) 

NPC's with dynamic locations - Monsters

User Database

Pool (deal with everything)

 

NPC's and monsters have pre-set locations, behaviors, shortly they will have their routine. for example lets name four monsters (scylla(FBCD),pyhton(FBCE), satir(FBCF), echidna(FBD0)) also creatures will have locations and health values. I dont want to go further with details. so pool unit has all informations and authority decent manupulations for NPC's and Monsters and get informations logged player via database. when player logged, pool will define a dynamic number as long as player logged and generate viewport for player and send package. a character has charid, charname, charloc(x,y,z), charstatus(idle,walking,flying,attacking etc), charhp(max,current), chararmor, charmp(current,max), charAttackPower, charDefence, charExp(current,max) there would be more informations or less... now 1st player in the pool. . when another player logged assume both player close each other... 2nd player will get viewport including 1st player appereance too.1st player only get 2nd player's appereance.  my point is only send or prepare necessarry packages. lets assume all informations belong a character 4 bytes each. and you send/receive 10 packages per sec... 520bytes per sec for a character with all informations(I know networking doesnt work like this. my point is this is tiny). I still think thats manageable.

As you can see English is not my main language I hope you get what I meant. this MMORPG idea like a virus(not software virus :)) taking control of my mind. I did some research about MMORPG advanced users says stay away. security issues details details bugs etc its hardcore I understand that. but still... I've desire to learn game programming, please put me right direction. 

 

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As long as you put the idea of making it an MMO firmly out of your mind, the rest dhould be easily doable. The MMO adds a degree of complexity that you are not nearly ready to tackle.

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When first starting ... you can't help but let your ideas run away with you ... that's ok

However, you should learn to separate "possible cool idea sessions" from "design sessions for my current project".

You're current project should be something you can do in 1-100 days of work ... and your next project can be a totally different code base / game / direction ... or it can simply be the next iteration of the same code base / game.

So an example might be like this:

 * project 1 - get a character able to move around on a map via user input, fight single type of monster, pick up items (perhaps health drops from the monster) and complete the game by defeating 3 of the monsters at once

NOTICE how even that tiny project is really like 5 subprojects: getting a character moving via input, loading a map and supporting "scroll" or "screens", monster and combat logic, pickup/healing, game completion (aka quest completion detection)

the project 2 could be another set of 3-8 notable improvement that would make take the game to the next level ...

and after 3-5 iterations of project, each doing 3-10 meaningful additions to your game and or feature set, you'd have yourself a really nice little personal game project.  (and depending on you and your pace this might be 6 months in the future, or 3 years in the future ... but it would however far and however long was appropriate for you based on how much time you wanted to invest, how driven you were, how much fun you were having, etc)  And all along the way, at least every few weeks or months you'd have stuff you could show (to your friends, classmates, future team members, etc).

And the whole time, you'd also formulate and think through hundreds of cool ideas for games you could build.  And no, you won't build most of those, or maybe any of them, but those ideas will serve you well if the time ever comes where you are in a position to make an actual mid to large scale game with a team.

 

 

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If I got it right you're studying C++ and want to use Unity Engine, correct? As far as I know Unity doesn't use C++, so if you actually want a chance to put into practice the C++ code you learned, you should go with Unreal Enginem as I did :P

 

Edited by MarcusAseth

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