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Operation KREEP - Weeklong Co-op Madness Sale

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Operation KREEP, the best :P couch co-op multiplayer Alien satire, is 67% off for a week!
If you are a sucker for retro games like Bomberman (Dyna Blaster) or Battle City make sure to give it a try!

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You can buy on:

icon_steam_small.png    icon_itchio_small.png

There is also a demo if you want to see the game in action first:
http://www.indiedb.com/games/operation-kreep/downloads

If you are interested in the development process, my blog holds a great bunch of write-ups about how it was made:

Remember:
In space no one can hear you KREEP...

Thanks for taking the time to check it out,
Take care and stay tuned for more news ;) !

Edited by Spidi
Broken links :(

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