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ISDCaptain01

Anyone here a self-taught graphics programmer?

109 posts in this topic

Me Too. I started programming with DirectX and C++, learning mostly from tutorials and examples from different places on the internet, and some other tools and languages this year (FYI, I'm 14 right now). And right now I'm working on a (or something similar enough to, or able to speed up any DX 9 Apps I might want to make) Game Engine. And yes of course, I'm still learning what a game engine should be like and how it should be made. Right now I'm still struggling with Mesh Animation, Particle FX (might have made a small mistake somewhere) and the more advanced concepts of 3D transformation, Physics and Mathematics. I also use OpenGL (and I've actually made a 3D app for someone, and gotten paid about $150 in US currency). And I work on an FPS game in Unity3D (Using a tutorial) from time to time.

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Truly neat topic!

I'm a completely self taught programmer and well I can't possibly have a degree anyway because I'm just 16, I'm in my last year of high school. I am mainly a C# programmer although I can also work with Java,C,C++ and Python.

 

I started learning programming about 5 years ago, I was into playing a lot of video games, then I got GTA San Andreas which wouldn't run on my computer because my machine was too old, it made me wonder why it wouldn't run, this led to research (on a dial up connection) I found out about BASIC and started doing some basic (pun intended) programming in it, however I didn't find it to be powerful enough for what I expected so I stopped, then a few months later our computer teacher began teaching us the basics of C++ (which never really worked out because he didn't know much himself, he just used the cprogramming.com tuts). This peaked my interest in programming again, I tried C++ but couldn't make much of it but I ended up discovering C#, I bought a few books about it and learned the basics, I go Visual Studio only to find out that my computer could barely handle it, this slowed my development a lot, eventually I gave up and went back to playing games.

 

Then I discovered Midtown Madness mods, I learned how to use zmodeler to make my own mods, soon I moved on to blender, then when I visited my sister at new york, she gave me her laptop which was quite recent (it's only about 2-3 years old), finally able to do things faster, I went back to C#, I quickly got used to it and started programming things on a daily basis (one project a week however most are still incomplete), then I got involved in the PSP hacking scene, it was a bit hard to get the basics of things like MIPS assembly (not to mention the fact that C/C++ were still incomprehensible to me) but I managed to figure everything out, then I got a PS Vita and a few months later PlayStation Mobile was launched. PSM  used C# which attracted me to the platform, that's where my 3d graphics adventure began. Along with a friend, I created Aperture Studios and we are currently working on our first title (and a 3d game engine) and very recently (infact a few days ago) I gave C++ a go again to find out that I properly understand everything!,

 

Anyway here's a video of what we have so far:

 

[media]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Gs-iczLGYBY[/media]

Edited by hgoel0974
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Hopefully my story is strange enough to be interesting.

 

My first computer was a ZX81, but I didn't really get into programming until I got an Acorn Electron in my teens, which had a better version of BASIC than any of its rivals and an inline assembler, which was a huge help. I wrote a few games in a mixture of BASIC and assembly that were published in Electron User magazine and helped reduce my student overdraft. What I liked about those days was that you could learn everything you needed to know about the computer in just 3 books, and one of those came with it.  And I miss looking forward to the magazine through the door every month instead of reading all the computer news online.

 

I made the mistake of studying Electronic Engineering at university, instead of Computer Science or Mathematics. It did give me my first experience of C though. I remember reading C For Programmers by Leendert Ammeraal  in one evening, and being one of the only people to come up with something approaching working code for that course project. At the end of my course I fell ill with ME/CFS, anxiety and depression, and I've never recovered enough to get a proper job.

 

I managed to scrape enough money together for a used Acorn Archimedes a year later and eagerly learnt ARM code, but I knew C was the way to go and eventually managed to afford a hard drive and the official C compiler - the RISC OS port of gcc was considered inferior in those days.  The first complete C program I wrote was Bombz, a free Sokoban-style puzzle game.  I also wrote some PD non-game software and tried to earn money by writing some educational software etc, but the platform was dying and that avenue was a big failure commercially.

 

I had to upgrade to a PC in 1998, but I hated Windows, and still personally use it as nothing more than a glorified games console, so I became a die-hard Linux user.  I didn't do much game programming for a long time, except to rewrite my Bombz game in python with a graphics makeover.  Then mobile gaming sprang up and now great things are happening in Linux gaming (Steam) so there might be an opportunity for me after all. I did yet another rewrite of Bombz for Android (Java with OpenGL ES 1.0 for rendering).

 

Now I'm writing a game loosely based on a very addictive old Archimedes game, but with 3D rendering.  I've chosen to use OpenGL (ES) directly instead of a ready-made engine so that I can do all my development on Linux with familiar tools and also support Raspberry Pi as well as PC Linux, Windows and Android.  Hopefully iOS and Mac too one day, and if Mac OS X isn't too awful I might consider using Unity3D :-).  I've had a quick look at jMonkeyEngine and three.js, and although I discounted them on portability grounds, they helped give me an idea of the typical architecture of a 3D engine.

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Hi,

 

I am a self taught Graphics/Shader programmer. In India, we don't get luxury of having university courses dedicated to Games or Graphics. By the time you get good at math, you don't even know why you are doing Laplace's transfom & where it is used in pratice... Its just the fact that "How is this done?" made me take up graphics programming & C++ to learn new exciting stuff ...

 

My Story so far ...

 

1. Get overwhelmed by seeing what people have been doing, wondering how they did it

2. Study, take each topic at once, there is a huge mountain to climb & you always start at the base

3. Get more overwhelmed as each day passes by

4. Study more, implement stuff, keep learning

5. Even more overwhelmed

6. Tell it to yourself that one day you will reach there ....  (After all , this journey has been awesome knowing there is still so much to learn ! )

 

Cheers.

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I am a self taught programmer. I started by following tutorials (text based), but usually they are quite boring so I usually quit quickly. Then I followed an extensive video course, which went very in depth, although I didn't understood much it still taught me the basics. I learned the most from messing around with code from others. Just experiment! that would be my advice!

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Self-taught, learned programming(a bit c,c++,delphi) out of boredom and well wanted to mod Half-Life back then^^

Quckly got into OpenGL and such mainly because i like to recreate things i see without knowing how it's done :D

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