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ISDCaptain01

Anyone here a self-taught graphics programmer?

109 posts in this topic

Posted (edited)

Hello, I am a self taught graphics programmer. I started with small games in XNA (I still recommend it to anyone for learning), then experimented with shaders and some terrain rendering (excellent tutorials by Riemers that got me started). My life has changed from that day when I implemented reflective and refractive water from that tutorial and I have been doing graphics programming ever since.

I started learning C++ while also doing DirectX 11 tutorials and creating a fighting game. Then it just grew out to be a full blown game engine and abandoned the fighting game. The engine is now known as Wicked Engine, and is open source.

promo.png

Thanks to my experience, I have started working at a game dev company called Neocore Games as a graphics programmer working on a Warhammer 40k title.

Edited by turanszkij
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@turanszkij Oh that's so cool to see you here, I've just found your videos through my youtube recommendations a few weeks ago !

 

Back to the topic:
I guess I don't have to show as much as most others here, but I'm currently "working" on becoming a self-taught graphics programmer :)
I've been messing around for 5 month now with the Vulkan API & Photorealistic rendering.
However, I got no experience with the "standard" way of doing video game graphics (that is, rasterization) but rather with Ray Tracing & more specifically Path Tracing since new year.
I'm currently trying to port my CPU Path Tracer to the GPU, when I got time...
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nh0_czzvT_A

I hope to get some small graphics programmer jobs on upwork or similar portals in the near future ;)
 

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@Life Is Good That's so cool even more so because I am not a frequent commenter here. :D

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Try and find mentors, people who are better than you who are willing to teach you and help you out. This was something I really craved when I was younger.
Where can you find a mentor online? Not sure people are willing to teach someone their knowledge to some stranger
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some of the best people i've worked with are self taught as well, I don't think it's particularly frowned upon if you've got the goods, getting formally trained does provide an easier path to a career though, but if you're an enterprising sort, you'll figure something out.

I find that my lack of formal training does leave some surprising gaps in my knowledge. Language mastery, for example is something that's taught with rigor, problem solving is really not. I have to ask guys around me about squirrely pointer questions that somehow I've managed to evade for 30 years all the time.
 

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Posted (edited)

I'm a self-taugh programmer, but in was easier in my "time", started in 81 with an Apple 2 switched in 88 on an Atari ST, became an official Atari dev on Falcon and TT in 93 and since my first program i only worked on game mostly, Farcry 1, star wars, avatar, rainbow 6, farcry primal, farcry 5, to name a few ;p. Left school at 16, so my math is bad. But thanks to Internet if i need something, i just have to search for what i need. 

http://www.mobygames.com/developer/sheet/view/developerId,168167/

And i just started to learn DX11 and get more advanced in shaders.

 

Edited by Enitalp
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Posted (edited)

Completely self taught here also. Started out on the C64 in the late 80's. Didn't start learning C++ until 2006, playing with Ogre 3D at the same time. Learning both simultaneously was a hard task as I didn't know any of the concepts of either.

Always being interested in way things tick, I tinkered around with DX9c and have now moved on to DX11. Still learning, but have the basics sorted out.

Here is a screenie of a game I have been working on for the past few years. Been chipping away when I feel like it, which is very intermittent. (Also in C++ and DX11).

 

Xtdgtp6.png

I'm quite proud of what I have achieved. Each strand of grass is individually animated and looks awesome swaying gently in the breeze.

I'm certainly no guru though. Still learning new things every day. I am a far cry from the masters that help out on the forums here.

Edited by lonewolff
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