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Tutorial Doctor

Blender for making Games?

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Wow! That is inspirational! I really need to know how to do UI elements, although I have taken some cues from games like Bioshock on how I can keep it simple yet good looking. 

 

I would love to see more posts on how people use Blender. 

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To be quite honest, with Blender you can do pretty much anything you want. It's a matter of personal preference and how fast can you work with it.

I've tried it, didn't really like the interface, didn't really like some of the workflow. I'm doing mostly architectural models, props and other stuff like that and I find working with 3DS Max more optimal for my case. However I've seen plenty of good stuff done fast with Blender. It's all up to the artist.

So in my mind, basically it's all up to personal preference :) as long as good assets are made, everything is cool.

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I'm not an artist, but I occasionally need to create simple models or edit something created by someone else -- I find any modelling package uncomfortable and unintuitive, most likely due to my lack of an art background.

 

With that background out of the way, I don't find Blender to be any worse (for me) than any other modelling package, and struggle with any new task.  I've found it reasonably easy to find instructions or a tutorial for most tasks I've wanted to accomplish though, and always seem to get whatever I'm doing done.  For my occasional uses the fact that Blender if free is a big win -- it simply isn't worth paying for software in my particular case.

 

 

Great artwork JTippets and Ashaman73! smile.png

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Maya Autodesk and zBrush are probably my preference for 3D modelling. Autodesk is great for animation, particles and fluids and zBrush is great for texturing. Of course with enough experience, it doesn't really matter. But if you're relatively new to either, that's what they're best for. I personally prefer Autodesk.

 

zBrush

Franck_Zbrush_by_ced66.jpg

 

Maya Autodesk

nondestructive_live_retargeting.png

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D1eLRWx.jpg

 

mV3DoSB.jpg

 

I like Blender, though I haven't really been using it for all that long. A couple years, maybe. I've dabbled with 3D Studio and (briefly) Maya, but neither really gelled with me. (Price might have something to do with that.) Blender is nice, and I really don't see why everyone bitches about the interface. Pre-2.5 and above, yeah, it was kind of a mess, but lately it's pretty nice. 

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WKnKMVU.png

 

I've been getting into Blender a lot lately, trying to learn a little bit about every part of the program. Once you start looking for how to actually use it, you find that Blender is like an iceburg - there's even more underneath. It's incredible how much you can do with that program. I've heard the built-in video editor rivals editors completely dedicated to video editing!

 

Also, I've used the Blender Game Engine successfully on five One Game a Month Games (the other games were either board games or written in C++): Stack, Vision, Hint: Shoot, Gravity, and The Curse. Although it's essential that you know Python to make most things, the logic bricks are nice for doing anything simple very quickly (if you don't have to write a script, then don't write a script). It is really nice to have a smooth workflow like the BGE because everything is integrated. I'm used to pure C++ & compiler, so this was a very refreshing feeling!

 

Although the engine might not seem like much, once you use it you'll find it's very powerful & intuitive. At the very least you can use it to make very rapid 3D prototypes.

 

I've also been entertained by the thought of using it for a high-school level course on computer science, game development, 3D modelling, and animation. Everything is integrated & you can get results fast enough that it seems more like play and less like work, which would help students stay motivated.

Edited by makuto

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